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201 - 210 of 308 results for: SOC

SOC 268: Global Organizations: The Matrix of Change (PUBLPOL 168, PUBLPOL 268, SOC 168)

We derive analytical tools from the social sciences in studying a variety of organizations given their strategies, and in particular, when their strategies change. Focus is on how to design effective organizations and projects within and across institutional settings. Theme: Labor market integration of refugees, an international outlook. Recommended: FINANCE 377, MS&E 180, SOC 160, ECON 149, or MGTECON 330.
Terms: Win | Units: 4

SOC 270: Classics of Modern Social Theory (SOC 170)

(Graduate students register for 270). We usually take it for granted that people around us follow social rules, norms, and conventions. But how are social order and stable social existence possible? And under what conditions does social change become possible? When we follow the rules or mobilize for new ones, do we act as free-willing individuals or do we merely respond to social structures that we have no control over? This class will discuss the insights from classical sociologists (Marx, Weber, Durkheim, and Simmel) on these and other fundamental social questions. We will discuss other macro-level issues like the emergence of capitalism, the relationship between social structure and politics, and the social sources of religion and political ideology. In doing so, we will analyze how these thinkers are still relevant to understanding contemporary social transformations as well as how the world has changed since these thinkers wrote.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4

SOC 271: Organizational Analysis (EDUC 288)

Principles of organizational behavior and analysis; theories of group and individual behavior; organizational culture; and applications to school organization and design. Case studies.
Terms: Win | Units: 4
Instructors: Powell, W. (PI)

SOC 273: Gender and Higher Education: National and International Perspectives (EDUC 173, EDUC 273, FEMGEN 173, SOC 173)

This course examines the ways in which higher education structures and policies interact with gender, gender identity, and other characteristics in the United States, around the world, and over time. Attention is paid to how changes in those structures and policies relate to access to, experiences in, and outcomes of higher education by gender. Students can expect to gain an understanding of theories and perspectives from the social sciences relevant to an understanding of the role of higher education in relation to structures of gender differentiation and hierarchy. Topics include undergraduate and graduate education; identity and sexuality; gender and science; gender and faculty; and feminist scholarship and pedagogy.
Last offered: Spring 2019

SOC 276: The Social Life of Neighborhoods (AFRICAAM 76B, CSRE 176B, SOC 176, URBANST 179)

How do neighborhoods come to be? How and why do they change? What is the role of power, money, race, immigration, segregation, culture, government, and other forces? In this course, students will interrogate these questions using literatures from sociology, geography, and political science, along with archival, observational, interview, and cartographic (GIS) methods. Students will work in small groups to create content (e.g., images, audio, and video) for a self-guided ¿neighborhood tour,¿ which will be added to a mobile app and/or website.
Last offered: Spring 2019

SOC 277D: Economic Elites in the 21st Century (SOC 177D)

Elites have gained disproportionately from the growth of the global economy over the past two decades, leading to serious concerns about inequality and to protests against the 1% in several countries. This course addresses the role of economic elites in the world economy and their relationship to global inequality. Topics include the evolution and consequences of global inequality, the composition of economic elites in various countries, and economic elites¿ impact on politics, education, culture, and the economy in the US and abroad. We also discuss potential solutions to global inequality.
Last offered: Winter 2016

SOC 278: Introduction to Computational Social Science (MS&E 231)

With a vast amount of data now collected on our online and offline actions -- from what we buy, to where we travel, to who we interact with -- we have an unprecedented opportunity to study complex social systems. This opportunity, however, comes with scientific, engineering, and ethical challenges. In this hands-on course, we develop ideas from computer science and statistics to address problems in sociology, economics, political science, and beyond. We cover techniques for collecting and parsing data, methods for large-scale machine learning, and principles for effectively communicating results. To see how these techniques are applied in practice, we discuss recent research findings in a variety of areas. Prerequisites: introductory course in applied statistics, and experience coding in R, Python, or another high-level language.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: Goel, S. (PI)

SOC 279: Law, Bias, & Algorithms (CS 209, CSRE 230, MS&E 330)

Human decision making is increasingly being displaced by predictive algorithms. Judges sentence defendants based on statistical risk scores; regulators take enforcement actions based on predicted violations; advertisers target materials based on demographic attributes; and employers evaluate applicants and employees based on machine-learned models. A predominant concern with the rise of such algorithmic decision making is that it may replicate or exacerbate human bias. Algorithms might discriminate, for instance, based on race or gender. This course surveys the legal and ethical principles for assessing the equity of algorithms, describes techniques for designing fair systems, and considers how antidiscrimination law and the design of algorithms may need to evolve to account for machine bias. Concepts will be developed in part through guided in-class coding exercises. Admission is by consent of instructor and is limited to 20 students. Grading is based on response papers, class participation, and a final project. Prerequisite: CS 106A or equivalent knowledge of coding.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: Goel, S. (PI)

SOC 279A: Crime and Punishment in America (SOC 179A)

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the way crime has been defined and punished in the United States. Recent social movements such as the Movement for Black Lives have drawn attention to the problem of mass incarceration and officer-involved shootings of people of color. These movements have underscored the centrality of the criminal justice system in defining citizenship, race, and democracy in America. How did our country get here? This course provides a social scientific perspective on America¿s past and present approach to crime and punishment. Readings and discussions focus on racism in policing, court processing, and incarceration; the social construction of crime and violence; punishment among the privileged; the collateral consequences of punishment in poor communities of color; and normative debates about social justice, racial justice, and reforming the criminal justice system. Students will learn to gather their own knowledge and contribute to normative debates through a field report assignment and an op-ed writing assignment.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5

SOC 280A: Foundations of Social Research (CSRE 180A, SOC 180A)

Formulating a research question, developing hypotheses, probability and non-probability sampling, developing valid and reliable measures, qualitative and quantitative data, choosing research design and data collection methods, challenges of making causal inference, and criteria for evaluating the quality of social research. Emphasis is on how social research is done, rather than application of different methods. Limited enrollment; preference to Sociology and Urban Studies majors, and Sociology coterms.
Terms: Win | Units: 4
Instructors: Pedulla, D. (PI)
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