2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020 2020-2021
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 
  COVID-19 Scheduling Updates!
Due to recent announcements about Autumn Quarter (see the President's update), please expect ongoing changes to the class schedule.

191 - 200 of 315 results for: SOC

SOC 254: Welfare State (SOC 354)

This seminar introduces students to the key literature, questions, and debates about the modern welfare state. Emergence, growth, and purported demise of the welfare state. American welfare state in comparative perspective. Social and political factors affecting state development including political parties, labor markets, gender, demographic change, and immigration.
Last offered: Winter 2020

SOC 254C: The Politics of Algorithms (COMM 154, COMM 254, CSRE 154T, SOC 154)

Algorithms have become central actors in today's digital world. In areas as diverse as social media, journalism, education, healthcare, and policing, computing technologies increasingly mediate communication processes. This course will provide an introduction to the social and cultural forces shaping the construction, institutionalization, and uses of algorithms. In so doing, we will explore how algorithms relate to political issues of modernization, power, and inequality. Readings will range from social scientific analyses to media coverage of ongoing controversies relating to Big Data. Students will leave the course with a better appreciation of the broader challenges associated with researching, building, and using algorithms.
Last offered: Autumn 2019

SOC 255: The Changing American Family (FEMGEN 155, FEMGEN 255, SOC 155)

Family change from historical, social, demographic, and legal perspectives. Extramarital cohabitation, divorce, later marriage, interracial marriage, and same-sex cohabitation. The emergence of same-sex marriage as a political issue. Are recent changes in the American family really as dramatic as they seem? Theories about what causes family systems to change.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4

SOC 256A: The Changing American City (CSRE 156, SOC 156A, URBANST 156A)

After decades of decline, U.S. cities today are undergoing major transformations. Young professionals are flocking to cities instead of fleeing to the suburbs. Massive increases in immigration have transformed the racial and ethnic diversity of cities and their neighborhoods. Public housing projects that once defined the inner city are disappearing, and crime rates have fallen dramatically. Do these changes signal the end of residential segregation and urban inequality? Who do these changes benefit? This course will explore these issues and strategies to address them through readings and discussion, analyzing a changing neighborhood in a major city in the Bay Area in groups (which will include at least one site visit), and studying a changing neighborhood or city of their choice for their final project. The course does not have pre-requisites.
Last offered: Autumn 2019

SOC 258B: Causal Inference in Quantitative Educational and Social Science Research (EDUC 430B)

This course surveys quantitative methods to make causal inferences in the absence of randomized experiment including the use of natural and quasi-experiments, instrumental variables, regression discontinuity, fixed effects estimators, and difference-in-differences. We emphasize the proper interpretation of these research designs and critical engagement with their key assumptions for applied researchers. Prerequisites: Prior training in multivariate regression (e.g., ECON 102B or the permission of the instructor).
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Dee, T. (PI)

SOC 258C: Using Data to Describe the World: Descriptive Social Science Research Techniques (EDUC 430C)

This course focuses on the skills needed to conduct theoretically-informed and policy-relevant descriptive social science. Students read recent examples of rigorous descriptive quantitative research that exemplifies the use of data to describe important phenomena related to educational and social inequality. The course will help develop skills necessary to conceptualize, operationalize, and communicate descriptive research, including techniques related to measurement and measurement error, data harmonization, data reduction, and visualization. Students develop a descriptive project during the course. Prerequisite: satisfactory completion of a course in multivariate regression.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 10 units total)
Instructors: reardon, s. (PI)

SOC 259: Social and Cultural Dimensions of Global Indigeneity (SOC 159)

This course will expose students to the rise of a world-wide indigenous identity, common themes embraced by indigenous people, and common challenges these groups confront when dealing with the larger social environment that surrounds them. Topics to be covered include tribal sovereignty, rights, and recognition; language preservation; the maintenance of cultural integrity and ethnic authenticity; cultural production and the commodification of indigenous culture; literary traditions; indigenous social movements; natural resources and land disputes; and the disadvantaged social position that these groups typically occupy.
Last offered: Spring 2014

SOC 260: Formal Organizations (SOC 160)

(Graduate students register for 260.) The roles of formal organizations in production processes, market transactions, and social movements; and as sources of income and ladders of mobility. Relationships of modern organizations to environments and internal structures and processes. Concepts, models, and tools for analyzing organizational phenomena in contemporary societies. Sources include the literature and case studies.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4
Instructors: Furuta, J. (PI)

SOC 261: The Social Science of Entrepreneurship (SOC 161)

(Graduate students register for 261.) Who is likely to become an entrepreneur and where is entrepreneurship likely to occur? Classic and contemporary theory and research. Interaction with expert practitioners in creating entrepreneurial opportunities including venture and corporate capitalists. The role of culture, markets, hierarchies, and networks. Market creation and change, and factors that affect success of new organizations. Field projects on entrepreneurial environments such as technology licensing offices, entrepreneurial development organizations, venture capital firms, and corporate venturing groups.
Last offered: Spring 2014

SOC 262: The Social Regulation of Markets (SOC 162)

Social and political forces that shape market outcomes. The emergence and creation of markets, how markets go wrong, and the roles of government and society in structuring market exchange. Applied topics include development, inequality, globalization, and economic meltdown. Preference to Sociology majors and Sociology coterm students.
Last offered: Spring 2018
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
teaching presence
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints