2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020 2020-2021
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 
  COVID-19 Scheduling Updates!
Due to recent announcements about Autumn Quarter (see the President's update), please expect ongoing changes to the class schedule.

161 - 170 of 316 results for: SOC

SOC 224B: Relational Sociology (EDUC 312)

Conversations, social relationships and social networks are the core features of social life. In this course we explore how conversations, relationships, and social networks not only have their own unique and independent characteristics, but how they shape one another and come to characterize many of the settings we enter and live in. As such, students will be introduced to theories and research methodologies concerning social interaction, social relationships, and social networks, as well as descriptions of how these research strands interrelate to form a larger relational sociology that can be employed to characterize a variety of social phenomenon. This course is suitable to advanced undergraduates and doctoral students.
Last offered: Winter 2018

SOC 224VP: Social Inequalities and Poverty in Latin America with focus on Brazil (SOC 124VP)

The central goal of this course is to promote an academic debate and knowledge exchange about social inequalities and poverty in Latin America, with an emphasis on Brazil, analyzing their impact on the scope of politics, the design of social policies and the interests of society. It is based on an analysis of Angus Deaton's work (Nobel Prize in Economics, 2015), that develops an economic-historical study and points out the great economic and social transformations that affect the process of evolution of social and health inequalities. Thus, what is proposed here is an analysis of the mutation of inequalities throughout the history of humanity. Deaton's relevant contribution is his approach to the process of overcoming inequalities and poverty over the last three centuries. His work demonstrates that, although the advances in terms of economic growth and quality of life have been extraordinary, there are inequalities between different regions and countries around the world. From this co more »
The central goal of this course is to promote an academic debate and knowledge exchange about social inequalities and poverty in Latin America, with an emphasis on Brazil, analyzing their impact on the scope of politics, the design of social policies and the interests of society. It is based on an analysis of Angus Deaton's work (Nobel Prize in Economics, 2015), that develops an economic-historical study and points out the great economic and social transformations that affect the process of evolution of social and health inequalities. Thus, what is proposed here is an analysis of the mutation of inequalities throughout the history of humanity. Deaton's relevant contribution is his approach to the process of overcoming inequalities and poverty over the last three centuries. His work demonstrates that, although the advances in terms of economic growth and quality of life have been extraordinary, there are inequalities between different regions and countries around the world. From this contextualization, the aim of this course is to discuss a contemporary approach to social development centered on the ideas of Amartya Sen (Nobel Prize in Economics, 1998), with a focus on capabilities. Sen's innovative perspective establishes that development should be centered on individuals¿ freedom of choice.
Last offered: Spring 2019

SOC 226: Introduction to Social Networks (SOC 126)

(Graduate students register for 226.) Theory, methods, and research. Concepts such as density, homogeneity, and centrality; applications to substantive areas. The impact of social network structure on individuals and groups in areas such as communities, neighborhoods, families, work life, and innovations.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4

SOC 227: Bargaining, Power, and Influence in Social Interaction (SOC 127)

(Graduate students register for 227.) Research and theoretical work on bargaining, social influence, and issues of power and justice in social settings such as teams, work groups, and organizations. Theoretical approaches to the exercise of power and influence in social groups and related issues in social interaction such as the promotion of cooperation, effects of competition and conflict, negotiation, and intergroup relations. Enrollment limited to 40.
Last offered: Autumn 2006

SOC 228: Introduction to Social Network Analysis (SOC 128)

(Graduate students register for SOC 228.) Theory and methods of network analysis in sociology (with an emphasis on social movements), anthropology, history, social psychology, economics, political science, and public health. Prerequisite: basic mathematics.
Last offered: Autumn 2010

SOC 229X: Urban Education (AFRICAAM 112, CSRE 112X, EDUC 112, EDUC 212, SOC 129X)

(Graduate students register for EDUC 212 or SOC 229X). Combination of social science and historical perspectives trace the major developments, contexts, tensions, challenges, and policy issues of urban education.
Last offered: Winter 2018

SOC 230: Education and Society (EDUC 120C, EDUC 220C, SOC 130)

The effects of schools and schooling on individuals, the stratification system, and society. Education as socializing individuals and as legitimizing social institutions. The social and individual factors affecting the expansion of schooling, individual educational attainment, and the organizational structure of schooling.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5

SOC 231: World, Societal, and Educational Change: Comparative Perspectives (EDUC 136, EDUC 306D)

Theoretical perspectives and empirical studies on the structural and cultural sources of educational expansion and differentiation, and on the cultural and structural consequences of educational institutionalization. Research topics: education and nation building; education, mobility, and equality; education, international organizations, and world culture.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5
Instructors: Ramirez, F. (PI)

SOC 232: Genetics and Society (EDUC 373)

This course will focus on social science engagement with developments in genetic research, focusing on two key issues. First, social scientists are trying to figure out how genetic data can be used to help them better understand phenomena they have been long endeavoring to understand. Second, social scientists try to improve understanding of how social environments moderate, amplify, or attenuate genetic influences on outcomes.
Last offered: Spring 2017 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 6 units total)

SOC 233A: Building and Leading Inclusive Organizations (SOC 133A)

This course takes a problem-solving focus. Our main goal is to learn to design research-based interventions to improve diversity, equity and inclusion outcomes in organizations. U.S. society has become increasingly more diverse, and yet our organizations do not reflect that diversity. Further, even successful efforts to improve diversity are often not accompanied by a plan to create truly inclusive organizations that support a diverse workforce or student body. We will begin by comparing explanations for the lack of diversity and inclusion in modern organizations. We will then examine research that illustrates the cost to individuals and organizations for failing to leverage the diverse talent in our society. Guest speakers will share their challenges and successes in increasing diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) in the organizations where they work. Then, it will be your turn. Working in teams you will design your own research-based intervention to promote DEI at the organizational, team, and individual level and present your intervention to the class. Along the way, you will also learn effective strategies for navigating non-inclusive organizations and for being an effective change agent in your own environment.
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
teaching presence
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints