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121 - 130 of 308 results for: SOC

SOC 177D: Economic Elites in the 21st Century (SOC 277D)

Elites have gained disproportionately from the growth of the global economy over the past two decades, leading to serious concerns about inequality and to protests against the 1% in several countries. This course addresses the role of economic elites in the world economy and their relationship to global inequality. Topics include the evolution and consequences of global inequality, the composition of economic elites in various countries, and economic elites¿ impact on politics, education, culture, and the economy in the US and abroad. We also discuss potential solutions to global inequality.
Last offered: Winter 2016

SOC 178: The Politics of Inequality (POLISCI 147P, PUBLPOL 247)

This course is about the distribution of power in contemporary democratic societies, and especially in the US: who governs? Is there a ``power elite,'' whose preferences dominate public policy making? Or, does policy reflect a wide range of interests? What is the relationship between income and power? What are the political consequences of increasing income inequality? How do income differences across racial and ethnic groups affect the quality of their representation? What are effective remedies for unequal influence? Finally, which institutions move democratic practice furthest towards full democratic equality? This course will address these questions, focusing first on local distributions of power, and then considering the implications of inequality in state and national politics. nStudents will have the opportunity to study income inequality using income and labor force surveys in a mid-term assignment. Then, in a final paper, students will conduct an empirical examination of the implications of income inequality for American democracy.
Last offered: Spring 2017 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

SOC 179A: Crime and Punishment in America (SOC 279A)

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the way crime has been defined and punished in the United States. Recent social movements such as the Movement for Black Lives have drawn attention to the problem of mass incarceration and officer-involved shootings of people of color. These movements have underscored the centrality of the criminal justice system in defining citizenship, race, and democracy in America. How did our country get here? This course provides a social scientific perspective on America¿s past and present approach to crime and punishment. Readings and discussions focus on racism in policing, court processing, and incarceration; the social construction of crime and violence; punishment among the privileged; the collateral consequences of punishment in poor communities of color; and normative debates about social justice, racial justice, and reforming the criminal justice system. Students will learn to gather their own knowledge and contribute to normative debates through a field report assignment and an op-ed writing assignment.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5

SOC 179N: The Science of Diverse Communities (CSRE 30N, EDUC 30N, PSYCH 30N)

This course is an exploration. Most generally, its aim is to identify distinguishing features of good diverse communities and articulate them well enough to offer principles or guidelines for how to design and manage such communities - all with a particular focus on educational communities like schools, universities, academic disciplines, etc., but with the hope that such principles might generalize to other kinds of organizations and the broader society. The readings range from those on the origins of human communities and social identities to those on intergroup trust building. They also aim to embed our discussions in the major diversity issues of the day, or example, what's in the news about campus life. nnnThus the course has a practical purpose: to develop testable ideas for improving the comfort level, fairness and goodness-for-all of identity diverse communities--especially in educational settings. nnnThe course also has a basic science purpose: to explore the psychological sig more »
This course is an exploration. Most generally, its aim is to identify distinguishing features of good diverse communities and articulate them well enough to offer principles or guidelines for how to design and manage such communities - all with a particular focus on educational communities like schools, universities, academic disciplines, etc., but with the hope that such principles might generalize to other kinds of organizations and the broader society. The readings range from those on the origins of human communities and social identities to those on intergroup trust building. They also aim to embed our discussions in the major diversity issues of the day, or example, what's in the news about campus life. nnnThus the course has a practical purpose: to develop testable ideas for improving the comfort level, fairness and goodness-for-all of identity diverse communities--especially in educational settings. nnnThe course also has a basic science purpose: to explore the psychological significance of community. Is there a psychological need for community? Is there something about a need for community that can't be reduced to other needs, for example, for a gender, racial or sexual-orientation identity? How strong is the need for community against other needs? What kinds of human groupings can satisfy it? In meeting this need, can membership in one community substitute for membership in others? What do people need from communities in order to thrive in them? Do strong diverse communities dampen intergroup biases? Can strong community loyalty mitigate identity tensions within communities? nnnSuch questions, the hope is, will help us develop a more systematic understanding of the challenges and opportunities inherent in diverse human communities.
Last offered: Autumn 2018

SOC 180A: Foundations of Social Research (CSRE 180A, SOC 280A)

Formulating a research question, developing hypotheses, probability and non-probability sampling, developing valid and reliable measures, qualitative and quantitative data, choosing research design and data collection methods, challenges of making causal inference, and criteria for evaluating the quality of social research. Emphasis is on how social research is done, rather than application of different methods. Limited enrollment; preference to Sociology and Urban Studies majors, and Sociology coterms.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI
Instructors: Pedulla, D. (PI)

SOC 180B: Introduction to Data Analysis (CSRE 180B, SOC 280B)

Methods for analyzing and evaluating quantitative data in sociological research. Students will be taught how to run and interpret multivariate regressions, how to test hypotheses, and how to read and critique published data analyses.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SI
Instructors: Jackson, M. (PI)

SOC 181B: Sociological Methods: Statistics (SOC 281B)

(Graduate students register for 281B.) Statistical methods of relevance to sociology: contingency tables, correlation, and regression.

SOC 183D: Addictions, Self, and Society

From your daily cup(s) of coffee to the ¿War on Drugs,¿ drugs touch the lives of most people. Yet, how societies deal with drug use and abuse change throughout time. In this course, we will look at drug use and abuse through a sociological lens, exploring how micro (personal), meso (interactional), and macro (structural) level forces underpin the meanings, experiences, and policies associated with drug use and abuse in the United States. Beyond this, we will examine how these forces contribute to persistent systems of inequality among different groups. This will not serve as a ¿how to¿ course, but one in which you will be asked to critically examine the role of drugs and their effects on society. By the end of this course, students should be able to:
Terms: Sum | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Sobotka, T. (PI)

SOC 184D: Policing in Society: From Precincts to Playgrounds

This course examines the social underpinnings of historical and modern-day policing. We will analyze trends in policing practices in the US through time, and ask how ¿ and to what effect ¿ police have become enmeshed in the social fabric of American life. Students will be exposed to some of the methods social scientists use to investigate society¿s most pressing issues as we examine the intersections of policing with other institutions (e.g. education, technology, and health) through both popular journalism and rigorous academic research.
Last offered: Summer 2019 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

SOC 185D: Gender and Politics

Despite gains in recent years, women remain dramatically underrepresented in virtually all realms of the American political system. In this course, students will become familiar with the empirical patterns and trends, social and cultural debates, and policy issues concerning the role of gender in American politics. We will examine the gender gap in voting patterns and mass political participation, as well as strategies for increasing women¿s representation. Students will come to understand the effects of women¿s lack of parity, including policy attitudes, processes, and outcomes. Furthermore, we will explore gender inequality in politics through an intersectional lens of race, class, age, education, and sexuality.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Orth, T. (PI)
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