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141 - 150 of 299 results for: SOC

SOC 205: Education and Inequality: Big Data for Large-Scale Problems (EDUC 107, EDUC 207, SOC 107E)

In this course, students will use data from the Stanford Education Data Archive (SEDA) to study the patterns, causes, consequences, and remedies of educational inequality in the US. SEDA is based on 200 million test score records, administrative data, and census data from every public school, school district, and community in the US. The course will include lectures, discussion, and small group research projects using SEDA and other data.
Last offered: Autumn 2016

SOC 205VP: Contested markets in the Brazilian Amazon Rainforest (EARTHSYS 205VP, SOC 105VP)

Strategies of environmental movements to contain domestic and foreign corporations that are viewed as major perpetrators of rainforest devastation and the socio-economic degradation of this vast region. Topics: Origins, roles and inter-relations among corporations (zero deforestation agreements in soybean agriculture and cattle ranching), the development of environmental law and the efficacy of government and NGO movements¿ strategies, and whether this emerging economy shapes social classes, groups, tribes, family life to further embed inequality and immobility. This course must be taken for a minimum of 3 units and a letter grade to be eligible for Ways credit.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-3
Instructors: Candido, S. (PI)

SOC 207: China After Mao (SOC 107)

China's post-1976 recovery from the late Mao era; its reorientation toward an open market-oriented economy; the consequences of this new model and runaway economic growth for standards of living, social life, inequality, and local governance; the political conflicts that have accompanied these changes.
Last offered: Spring 2009

SOC 208: Political & Historical Sociology (SOC 108)

The differences between historical and sociological analysis of past events. The difference between constructing sociological explanations and describing past events. Topics include: the rise of Christianity, the mafia in a Sicilian village, the trade network of the East India Company.
Last offered: Spring 2014

SOC 211: State and Society in Korea (INTNLREL 143, SOC 111)

20th-century Korea from a comparative historical perspective. Colonialism, nationalism, development, state-society relations, democratization, and globalization with reference to the Korean experience.
Terms: Win | Units: 4
Instructors: Shin, G. (PI)

SOC 214: Economic Sociology (SOC 114)

(Graduate students register for 214.) The sociological approach to production, distribution, consumption, and markets, emphasizing the impact of norms, power, social structure, and institutions on the economy. Comparison of classic and contemporary approaches to the economy among the social science disciplines. Topics: consumption, labor markets, organization of professions such as law and medicine, the economic role of informal networks, industrial organization, including the structure and history of the computer and popular music industries, business alliances, capitalism in non-Western societies, and the transition from state socialism in E. Europe and China.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4

SOC 216: Chinese Organizations and Management (SOC 116)

Seminar for advanced undergraduates and all graduate students.
Last offered: Spring 2014

SOC 217A: China Under Mao (SOC 117A)

(Graduate students register for 217A.) The transformation of Chinese society from the 1949 revolution to the eve of China's reforms in 1978: creation of a socialist economy, reorganization of rural society and urban workplaces, emergence of new inequalities of power and opportunity, and new forms of social conflict during Mao's Cultural Revolution of 1966-69 and its aftermath.
Last offered: Spring 2016

SOC 217B: Chinese Politics and Society (SOC 317B)

(Doctoral students register for 317B.) This seminar surveys the major turning points that have shaped China's evolution since 1949. The topics covered include the Great Leap Forward, the Cultural Revolution, the political and economic turning point of the early 1980s, the political crisis of 1989, the restructuring of the state sector since the 1990s, and the patterns of protest that have accompanied the rapid social changes over the past three decades. We will conclude the course with current debates about China's future.
Last offered: Winter 2018 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom

SOC 218: Social Movements and Collective Action (SOC 118)

Why social movements arise, who participates in them, the obstacles they face, the tactics they choose, and how to gauge movement success or failure. Theory and empirical research. Application of concepts and methods to social movements such as civil rights, environmental justice, antiglobalization, and anti-war.
Last offered: Spring 2017
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