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41 - 50 of 269 results for: SOC

SOC 117A: China Under Mao (SOC 217A)

(Graduate students register for 217A.) The transformation of Chinese society from the 1949 revolution to the eve of China's reforms in 1978: creation of a socialist economy, reorganization of rural society and urban workplaces, emergence of new inequalities of power and opportunity, and new forms of social conflict during Mao's Cultural Revolution of 1966-69 and its aftermath.
Last offered: Spring 2016 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI

SOC 117D: Recognizing Inequality

Over the last few years social and economic inequality has become a major topic in the media and public policy. Gaps and inequalities between groups exist across a range of arenas including education, wages and promotions, housing and cultural consumption. In this course we'll bring these big ideas down to the individual level--investigating and analyzing manifestations of inequality in our everyday lives, considering why these inequalities exist and developing strategies to alleviate them. This seminar will call upon students' imagination and analytical savvy to tackle pressing societal problems by considering the dynamics of their own lives. In the process, students will develop skills that can be applied in fields as diverse as public policy, health care, non-profit work and entrepreneurship.
Last offered: Summer 2015

SOC 118: Social Movements and Collective Action (SOC 218)

Why social movements arise, who participates in them, the obstacles they face, the tactics they choose, and how to gauge movement success or failure. Theory and empirical research. Application of concepts and methods to social movements such as civil rights, environmental justice, antiglobalization, and anti-war.
Last offered: Spring 2017 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci

SOC 118D: Ice Cream Sales Don't Cause Shark Attacks: Debunking Pseudoscience and Conducting Good Research

Conducting good research requires careful design and analysis, but much of the research we consume from media and political outlets often presents spurious correlations as causal relationships. What do we need to do and why to rule out spuriousness? The focus will be on using our intuition about what information we would need to properly answer questions about social life. We will find that apparently complicated statistical tests are simply following the same logic necessary to reach conclusions about social science's most interesting questions.
Last offered: Summer 2017

SOC 119: Understanding Large-Scale Societal Change: The Case of the 1960s (SOC 219)

The demographic, economic, political, and cultural roots of social change in the 60s; its legacy in the present U.S.
Last offered: Spring 2013 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci

SOC 119D: The Power of Social Networks in Everyday Life

Why do some people have better ideas than others? Why are some more likely to be bullied in school, get a job, or catch a disease? Why do some innovations, apps, rumors, or revolutions spread like a wildfire, while others never get off the ground? Why are Facebook, Twitter, Instagram or Spotify so good at recommending people, news, pictures, or songs we might know or like? What do a power outage, the collapse of the Roman Empire, a human stroke, and the Financial Crisis of 2008 have in common? What explains the success of Silicon Valley? And why are there only six (or less) people between us and any other human on this planet? While these questions may seem totally unrelated to each other on first glance, they can all be explored with the help of a single, yet powerful framework: social network analysis. In this class, you will learn to see the world as a web of relations: not only are people, ideas/concepts and things all increasingly connected to each other; the pattern of these relations can tell us a great deal about many phenomena in our social world that defy traditional explanations. At the end of this class, you will not only see networks everywhere; you will have taken a big step toward connecting some of the dots in (y)our world: this is the power of thinking in relations.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Hahn, M. (PI)

SOC 120: Interpersonal Relations (SOC 220)

(Graduate students register for 220.) Forming ties, developing norms, status, conformity, deviance, social exchange, power, and coalition formation; important traditions of research have developed from the basic theories of these processes. Emphasis is on understanding basic theories and drawing out their implications for change in a broad range of situations, families, work groups, and friendship groups.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci

SOC 120VP: Poverty and Inequality in Israel

Poverty rates in Israel are high and have been relatively stable in recent decades, with about one fifth of all households (and a third of all children) living below the poverty line. In this class we will learn about poverty and inequality in Israel and we will compare with the US and other countries.nnIn the first few weeks of this class we will review basic theories of poverty and inequality and we will discuss how theories regarding poverty have changed over the years, from the "culture of poverty" to theories of welfare state regimes. We will also learn about various ways of measuring poverty, material hardship, and inequality, and we will review the methods and data used.nnIn the remaining weeks of the class we will turn to substantive topics such as gender, immigration, ethnicity/nationality, welfare policy, age, and health. Within each topic we will survey the debates within contemporary scholarship and we will compare Israel and the US. Examination of these issues will introduce students to some of the challenges that Israeli society faces today.
| UG Reqs: WAY-SI

SOC 121: The Individual in Social Structure: Foundations in Sociological Social Psychology

Dynamics of the relationship between the individual and social structure, the relationship between the individual and immediate social context, and relationships between individuals. Focus is on the dominant theoretical perspectives in sociological social psychology: social structure and personality, structural social psychology, and symbolic interactionism.
Last offered: Spring 2010

SOC 121VP: Family and Society in Israel

Families are changing: Non-marital partnerships such as cohabitation are becoming more common, marriage is delayed and fertility is declining. In this class we will learn about how families are changing in Israel and we will compare with the US and other countries. Reading materials include general theories as well as research published in scholarly journals. nnAfter reviewing general theories and major scholarly debates concerning issues of family change, we will turn to specific family processes and compare Israel, the US and other countries. We will ask how family transitions may differ for different population groups and at different stages of the life course, and we will tie family processes to current theories of gender. nnWe will cover a wide range of topics, from marriage and marital dissolution to cohabitation, LAT and remarriage. We will also discuss changes in women's labor force participation and how it bears on fertility, parenthood and household division of labor. Within each substantive topic we will survey the debates within contemporary scholarship and we will compare Israel and the US
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