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71 - 80 of 226 results for: SOC

SOC 241: Controversies about Inequality (SOC 141)

(Graduate students register for 241.) Debate format involving Stanford and guest faculty. Forms of inequality including racial, ethnic, and gender stratification; possible policy interventions. Topics such as welfare reform, immigration policy, affirmative action, discrimination in labor markets, sources of income inequality, the duty of rich nations to help poor nations, and causes of gender inequality.

SOC 242: Sociology of Gender (FEMGEN 142, FEMGEN 242, SOC 142)

(Graduate students register for 242.) Gender inequality in contemporary American society and how it is maintained. The social and relative nature of knowledge and the problems this poses for understanding sex differences and gendered behavior in society. Analytical levels of explanation for gender inequalities: socialization, interaction processes, and socioeconomic processes; arguments and evidence for each approach. The social consequences of gender inequality such as the feminization of poverty, and problems of interpersonal relations.

SOC 245: Race and Ethnic Relations in the USA (CSRE 145, SOC 145)

(Graduate students register for 245.) Race and ethnic relations in the U.S. and elsewhere. The processes that render ethnic and racial boundary markers, such as skin color, language, and culture, salient in interaction situations. Why only some groups become targets of ethnic attacks. The social dynamics of ethnic hostility and ethnic/racial protest movements.
Instructors: Snipp, C. (PI)

SOC 248: Comparative Ethnic Conflict (CSRE 148, SOC 148)

Causes and consequences of racial and ethnic conflict, including nationalist movements, ethnic genocide, civil war, ethnic separatism, politics, indigenous peoples' movements, and minority rights movements around the world.

SOC 249: The Urban Underclass (SOC 149, URBANST 112)

(Graduate students register for 249.) Recent research and theory on the urban underclass, including evidence on the concentration of African Americans in urban ghettos, and the debate surrounding the causes of poverty in urban settings. Ethnic/racial conflict, residential segregation, and changes in the family structure of the urban poor.

SOC 251: From the Cradle to the Grave: How Demographic Processes Shape the Social World (SOC 151)

(Graduate students register for 251.) Comparative analysis of historical, contemporary, and anticipated demographic change. Draws on case studies from around the world to explore the relationship between social structure and population dynamics. Introduces demographic measures, concepts and theory. Course combines lecture and seminar-style discussion.

SOC 252: The Social Determinants of Health (SOC 152)

How social differences, such as where we live, whether and how we work, or how much money we make, and our gender, race or ethnicity, also play a role in who gets sick and who does not.

SOC 255: The Changing American Family (FEMGEN 155, FEMGEN 255, SOC 155)

Family change from historical, social, demographic, and legal perspectives. Extramarital cohabitation, divorce, later marriage, interracial marriage, and same-sex cohabitation. The emergence of same-sex marriage as a political issue. Are recent changes in the American family really as dramatic as they seem? Theories about what causes family systems to change.

SOC 258: Applied Quasi-Experimental Research in Education (EDUC 255C)

Course will provide hands-on practice in analysis of data from experimental and quasi-experimental research designs, including a) instrumental variables estimators; b) regression discontinuity estimators; c) difference-in-difference estimators; d) matching estimators; e) fixed effects estimators; and f) panel data methods (including individual fixed effects models, lagged covariate adjustment models, growth models, etc.). Prerequisites: satisfactory completion of EDUC 255B, EDUC 257C or SOC 257.

SOC 259: Social and Cultural Dimensions of Global Indigeneity (SOC 159)

This course will expose students to the rise of a world-wide indigenous identity, common themes embraced by indigenous people, and common challenges these groups confront when dealing with the larger social environment that surrounds them. Topics to be covered include tribal sovereignty, rights, and recognition; language preservation; the maintenance of cultural integrity and ethnic authenticity; cultural production and the commodification of indigenous culture; literary traditions; indigenous social movements; natural resources and land disputes; and the disadvantaged social position that these groups typically occupy.
Last offered: Spring 2014
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