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51 - 60 of 226 results for: SOC

SOC 207: China After Mao (SOC 107)

China's post-1976 recovery from the late Mao era; its reorientation toward an open market-oriented economy; the consequences of this new model and runaway economic growth for standards of living, social life, inequality, and local governance; the political conflicts that have accompanied these changes.

SOC 208: Political & Historical Sociology (SOC 108)

The differences between historical and sociological analysis of past events. The difference between constructing sociological explanations and describing past events. Topics include: the rise of Christianity, the mafia in a Sicilian village, the trade network of the East India Company.

SOC 211: State and Society in Korea (INTNLREL 143, SOC 111)

20th-century Korea from a comparative historical perspective. Colonialism, nationalism, development, state-society relations, democratization, and globalization with reference to the Korean experience.

SOC 214: Economic Sociology (SOC 114)

(Graduate students register for 214.) The sociological approach to production, distribution, consumption, and markets, emphasizing the impact of norms, power, social structure, and institutions on the economy. Comparison of classic and contemporary approaches to the economy among the social science disciplines. Topics: consumption, labor markets, organization of professions such as law and medicine, the economic role of informal networks, industrial organization, including the structure and history of the computer and popular music industries, business alliances, capitalism in non-Western societies, and the transition from state socialism in E. Europe and China.

SOC 217A: China Under Mao (SOC 117A)

(Graduate students register for 217A.) The transformation of Chinese society from the 1949 revolution to the eve of China's reforms in 1978: creation of a socialist economy, reorganization of rural society and urban workplaces, emergence of new inequalities of power and opportunity, and new forms of social conflict during Mao's Cultural Revolution of 1966-69 and its aftermath.

SOC 218: Social Movements and Collective Action (SOC 118)

Why social movements arise, who participates in them, the obstacles they face, the tactics they choose, and how to gauge movement success or failure. Theory and empirical research. Application of concepts and methods to social movements such as civil rights, environmental justice, antiglobalization, and anti-war.
Instructors: McAdam, D. (PI)

SOC 220: Interpersonal Relations (SOC 120)

(Graduate students register for 220.) Forming ties, developing norms, status, conformity, deviance, social exchange, power, and coalition formation; important traditions of research have developed from the basic theories of these processes. Emphasis is on understanding basic theories and drawing out their implications for change in a broad range of situations, families, work groups, and friendship groups.
Instructors: Ridgeway, C. (PI)

SOC 229: Social Psychology: Self and Society (SOC 129)

Why do people behave the way they do? This fundamental question drives social psychology, a field that bridges psychology and sociology. This course surveys social psychological research on a wide variety of topics including conformity, morality, respect, generosity, identity, and prejudice, giving students a deeper understanding of the causal architecture of the social world.
Instructors: Watts, A. (PI)

SOC 229X: Urban Education (AFRICAAM 112, CSRE 112X, EDUC 112X, EDUC 212X, SOC 129X)

(Graduate students register for EDUC 212X or SOC 229X). Combination of social science and historical perspectives trace the major developments, contexts, tensions, challenges, and policy issues of urban education.
Instructors: Ball, A. (PI)

SOC 230: Education and Society (EDUC 120C, EDUC 220C, SOC 130)

The effects of schools and schooling on individuals, the stratification system, and society. Education as socializing individuals and as legitimizing social institutions. The social and individual factors affecting the expansion of schooling, individual educational attainment, and the organizational structure of schooling.
Instructors: Ramirez, F. (PI)
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