2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

121 - 130 of 226 results for: SOC

SOC 133: Law and Wikinomics: The Economic and Social Organization of the LegalnnProfession (SOC 333)

(Graduate and Law students enroll in 333.) Seminar. Emphasis is on the labor market for large-firm lawyers, including the market for entry-level lawyers, attorney retention and promotion practices, lateral hiring of partners, and increased use of forms of employment such as the non-equity form of partnership. Race and gender discrimination and occupational segregation; market-based pressure tactics for organizational reform. Students groups collect and analyze data about the profession and its markets. Multimedia tools for analysis and for producing workplace reforms. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
| Repeatable for credit

SOC 136A: Law and Society (SOC 236A)

Law and social inequality. Major sociological perspectives on where the law comes from, what law and justice systems do, and how they work.

SOC 136B: Advanced Topics in Sociology of Law (SOC 236B)

(Same as LAW 538.) Historical perspectives on the origins of law, rationality and legal sanctions, law on the books versus the law in action, crime and deviance, school desegregation, privitization of prisons, American civil rights, file sharing, jury decision making, the role of lawyers and judges, and cynicism about the American legal system.

SOC 138: American Indians in Comparative Historical Perspective (NATIVEAM 138, SOC 238)

(Graduate students register for 238.) Demographic, political, and economic processes and events that shaped relations between Euro-Americans and American Indians, 1600-1890. How the intersection of these processes affected the outcome of conflicts between these two groups, and how this conflict was decisive in determining the social position of American Indians in the late 19th century and the evolution of the doctrine of tribal sovereignty.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul

SOC 143: Sociology of the Middle Class

This class focuses on understanding of how social research is conducted, and gaining the ability to evaluate the quality ofnempirical research. The course will focus on the process of designing a research project, including: formulating research questions, developing hypotheses, developing valid and reliable measures, deciding on the types of data needed, making decisions on sampling, choosing research design and data collection methods, the challenges of making causal inferences, and criteria for evaluating the quality of social research.

SOC 144: Inequality and the Workplace (SOC 244)

How characteristics of workplaces, such as hiring practices, workforce diversity, organizational policies and legal mandates, produce variation in inequality. Examines the sources, extent, and consequences of workplace inequality across gender, racial and ethnic lines. Topics include earnings, social status, geographical location, and opportunities for people in the workforce.

SOC 150: Race and Political Sociology (CSRE 150, SOC 250)

How race informs the theories and research within political sociology. The state's role in creation and maintenance of racial categories, the ways in which racial identity motivates political actors, how race is used to legitimate policy decisions, comparisons across racial groups. Emphasis on understanding the ways race operates in the political arena.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci

SOC 159: Social and Cultural Dimensions of GlobalnIndigeneity (SOC 259)

This course will expose students to the rise of a world-wide indigenous identity, common themes embraced by indigenous people, and common challenges these groups confront when dealing with the larger social environment that surrounds them. Topics to be covered include tribal sovereignty, rights, and recognition; language preservation; the maintenance of cultural integrity and ethnic authenticity; cultural production and the commodification of indigenous culture; literary traditions; indigenous social movements; natural resources and land disputes; and the disadvantaged social position that these groups typically occupy.

SOC 161: The Social Science of Entrepreneurship (SOC 261)

(Graduate students register for 261.) Who is likely to become an entrepreneur and where is entrepreneurship likely to occur? Classic and contemporary theory and research. Interaction with expert practitioners in creating entrepreneurial opportunities including venture and corporate capitalists. The role of culture, markets, hierarchies, and networks. Market creation and change, and factors that affect success of new organizations. Field projects on entrepreneurial environments such as technology licensing offices, entrepreneurial development organizations, venture capital firms, and corporate venturing groups.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci

SOC 163: Foundations of Organizational Theory (SOC 263)

Foundational material in organizational theory literature.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints