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11 - 20 of 226 results for: SOC

SOC 107: China After Mao (SOC 207)

China's post-1976 recovery from the late Mao era; its reorientation toward an open market-oriented economy; the consequences of this new model and runaway economic growth for standards of living, social life, inequality, and local governance; the political conflicts that have accompanied these changes.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI

SOC 108: Political & Historical Sociology (SOC 208)

The differences between historical and sociological analysis of past events. The difference between constructing sociological explanations and describing past events. Topics include: the rise of Christianity, the mafia in a Sicilian village, the trade network of the East India Company.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI

SOC 111: State and Society in Korea (INTNLREL 143, SOC 211)

20th-century Korea from a comparative historical perspective. Colonialism, nationalism, development, state-society relations, democratization, and globalization with reference to the Korean experience.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom

SOC 112: Comparative Democratic Development (POLISCI 147)

Social, cultural, political, economic, and international factors affecting the development and consolidation of democracy in historical and comparative perspective. Individual country experiences with democracy, democratization, and regime performance. Emphasis is on the third wave of democratization over the past three decades and contemporary possibilities for democratic change. (Diamond)
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom

SOC 113: Comparative Corruption (POLISCI 143S)

Causes, effects, and solutions to various forms of corruption in business and politics in both developing regions (e.g. Asia, E. Europe) and developed ones (the US and the EU).
Terms: Aut | Units: 4
Instructors: Young, P. (PI)

SOC 114: Economic Sociology (SOC 214)

(Graduate students register for 214.) The sociological approach to production, distribution, consumption, and markets, emphasizing the impact of norms, power, social structure, and institutions on the economy. Comparison of classic and contemporary approaches to the economy among the social science disciplines. Topics: consumption, labor markets, organization of professions such as law and medicine, the economic role of informal networks, industrial organization, including the structure and history of the computer and popular music industries, business alliances, capitalism in non-Western societies, and the transition from state socialism in E. Europe and China.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI

SOC 114D: Sociology of the Great Recession

The Great Recession (2007-2009), one of the most socially significant events of our time. This course will cover the economic, social, cultural, and political consequences of the recession. We will address its impact on: inequality; job prospects for college graduates; trust in the government; the 2012 presidential election; marriage; child birth; and immigration. We examine the rise of protest movements during the recession period, such as Occupy Wall Street and the Tea Party, and explore the idea of "class warfare". Class will feature several guest speakers and will focus on developing a general understanding of trends emerging in these events.
Last offered: Summer 2014

SOC 115: Topics in Economic Sociology (SOC 315)

(Graduate students register for 315.) Discussion of topics initially explored in 114/214, with emphasis on countries and cultures outside N. America. Possible topics: families and ethnic groups in the economy, corporate governance and control, corporate strategy, relations among firms in industrial districts and business groups, the impact of national institutions and cultures on economic outcomes, transitions from state socialism and the role of the state in economic development. Possible case studies: the U.S., Germany, Italy, Britain, France, Brazil, Korea, India, Japan, and China. Prerequisite: 114/214 or 314.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI

SOC 115D: Can Law Fix Race? Race, Law, and Contemporary American Society

In this Age of Obama, why are we still talking about legal remedies to racial inequality? This course will explore this question from an interdisciplinary perspective, focusing on perspectives from law and social science. Students will read both actual Supreme Court opinions as well as foundational works in the sociology of race and law. Through readings and discussion, students will leave this course with 1) a background in the historical role of the law in relation to race; 2) an understanding in how law¿s role in the maintenance of racial inequality has evolved; and 3) an ability to articulate their own views on why we are and whether we should be still talking about race, using both theory and empirical evidence to support their views. Specifically, students will be able to answer this question: ¿Is it appropriate for law to attempt to remedy racial inequality?¿
Last offered: Summer 2014

SOC 116D: The Sociological Complexities of Human Trafficking

Human trafficking is more than a crime and a human rights violation; it reveals the complex interactions of social norms, policies, and actions. In this course, we will consider norms of sexuality and morality in relation to sex trafficking and consenting sex workers, politics and labor policy in relation to labor trafficking and day workers, and political consumerism as a form of collective action in relation to fair trade. Specific topics include the impact of legalized prostitution on human trafficking, the effects of the annual US-released Trafficking In Persons report on international migrant labor laws, and the question of whether or not fair trade is fair. This seminar will provide students opportunities to think critically about society and to collaborate as researchers and activists on the issue of human trafficking.
Last offered: Summer 2014
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