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1 - 9 of 9 results for: SLAVIC

SLAVIC 103Q: Subversive Acts: Invention and Convention in the 20th Century

Course investigates a range of artistic, social, and political meanings of the term avant garde in the 20th century. Several major international avant-garde artifacts, texts, and films will be explored through the prism of artistic and political subversion. This course traces a wide range of aesthetic case studies, which offer unique visions of how art influences and subverts established social practices and challenges political ideologies.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Skakov, N. (PI)

SLAVIC 148: Slavic Literature and Cultures since the Death of Stalin (SLAVIC 348)

The course offers a survey of Soviet and post-Soviet literary texts and films created by Russian, Ukrainian and Belarusian artists and marginalized or repressed by the Soviet regime. The first part of the course will focus on the topics of opposition and dissent, generational conflict, modernization, Soviet everyday life, gender, citizenship and national identity, state-published and samizdat literature, "village" and "cosmopolitan" culture, etc. The second part of it will be devoted to the postmodernist aesthetics and ideology in the dismantlement of totalitarian society, as well in the process of shaping post-Soviet identities. The reading materials range from the fictional, poetic, and publicistic works written by Noble-prize (Solzhenitsyn, Brodsky, Alexievich) and other major writers of the period to the drama, film, and popular culture.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Ilchuk, Y. (PI)

SLAVIC 199: Individual Work for Undergraduates

Open to Russian majors or students working on special projects. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

SLAVIC 224: The Russian Postmodern Text

What is the place of postmodernism in Russia? The course aims to answer the question by engaging with theories of postmodernity (Baudrillard, Barthes, Derrida) and through close reading of several gems of Russian postmodern literature and art: Venedikt Erofeeva¿s Moscow-Petushki, Sasha Sokolov's School for Fools, Vladimir Sorokin's Norma, Dmitrii Prigova¿s selected poems, and Ilya Kabakov texts. Texts read in Russian. Taught in Russian
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

SLAVIC 230: 18th Century Russian Literature

For graduate students and upper-level undergraduates. Russian literature of the long 18th century, from the late 1600s to 1800. Readings in the Baroque, Neoclassicism and Sentimentalism. Major works are examined in their literary and historical context and also in relation to the principal subcultures of the period, including the court, academy, church and Old Believer diaspora.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Ilchuk, Y. (PI)

SLAVIC 245: Slavic Literary Theory: Formalism Structuralism Semiotics, Formalism and Structuralism

Introduction to seminal Slavic contributions to 20th c. literary theory (formalism, structuralism, semiotics) considered in broader intellectual historical context. First half of course to focus on central concepts of Russian formalism (material and device, defamiliarization, poetic language, narrative structure, literary evolution) through writings of Shklovsky, Eikhenbaum, Tynianov, Jakobson and others. Second half to look at subsequent developments in Czech and French structuralism (Mukarovsky, Levi-Strauss, Barthes) and Soviet semiotics (Lotman).
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Merrill, J. (PI)

SLAVIC 348: Slavic Literature and Cultures since the Death of Stalin (SLAVIC 148)

The course offers a survey of Soviet and post-Soviet literary texts and films created by Russian, Ukrainian and Belarusian artists and marginalized or repressed by the Soviet regime. The first part of the course will focus on the topics of opposition and dissent, generational conflict, modernization, Soviet everyday life, gender, citizenship and national identity, state-published and samizdat literature, "village" and "cosmopolitan" culture, etc. The second part of it will be devoted to the postmodernist aesthetics and ideology in the dismantlement of totalitarian society, as well in the process of shaping post-Soviet identities. The reading materials range from the fictional, poetic, and publicistic works written by Noble-prize (Solzhenitsyn, Brodsky, Alexievich) and other major writers of the period to the drama, film, and popular culture.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Ilchuk, Y. (PI)

SLAVIC 399: INDIVIDUAL WORK

Open to Russian majors or students working on special projects. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

SLAVIC 802: TGR Dissertation

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 0 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: TGR
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