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1 - 10 of 19 results for: Robert Siegel

AFRICAST 114N: Desert Biogeography of Namibia Prefield Seminar (EARTHSYS 115N)

Desert environments make up a third of the land areas on Earth, ranging from the hottest to the coldest environments. Aridity leads to the development of unique adaptations among the organisms that inhabit them. Climate change and other processes of desertification as well as increasing human demand for habitable and cultivatable areas have resulting in increasing need to better understand these systems. Namibia is a model system for studying these processes and includes the Sossuvlei (Sand Sea) World Heritable Site. This seminar will prepare students for their overseas field experience in Namibia. The seminar will provide an introduction to desert biogeography and culture, using Namibia as a case study. During the seminar, students will each give two presentations on aspects of desert biogeography and ecology, specific organisms and their adaptations to arid environments, cultural adaptations of indigenous peoples and immigrants, ecological threats and conservation efforts, and/or nat more »
Desert environments make up a third of the land areas on Earth, ranging from the hottest to the coldest environments. Aridity leads to the development of unique adaptations among the organisms that inhabit them. Climate change and other processes of desertification as well as increasing human demand for habitable and cultivatable areas have resulting in increasing need to better understand these systems. Namibia is a model system for studying these processes and includes the Sossuvlei (Sand Sea) World Heritable Site. This seminar will prepare students for their overseas field experience in Namibia. The seminar will provide an introduction to desert biogeography and culture, using Namibia as a case study. During the seminar, students will each give two presentations on aspects of desert biogeography and ecology, specific organisms and their adaptations to arid environments, cultural adaptations of indigenous peoples and immigrants, ecological threats and conservation efforts, and/or national and international policy towards deserts. Additional assignments include a comprehensive dossier and a final exam. Students will also carry out background research for the presentations they will be giving during the field seminar where access to the internet and to other scholarly resources will be limited. In addition, we will cover logistics, health and safety, cultural sensitivity, geography, and politics. We will deal with post-field issues such as reverse culture shock, and ways in which participants can consolidate and build up their abroad experiences after they return to campus.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Siegel, R. (PI)

EARTHSYS 115N: Desert Biogeography of Namibia Prefield Seminar (AFRICAST 114N)

Desert environments make up a third of the land areas on Earth, ranging from the hottest to the coldest environments. Aridity leads to the development of unique adaptations among the organisms that inhabit them. Climate change and other processes of desertification as well as increasing human demand for habitable and cultivatable areas have resulting in increasing need to better understand these systems. Namibia is a model system for studying these processes and includes the Sossuvlei (Sand Sea) World Heritable Site. This seminar will prepare students for their overseas field experience in Namibia. The seminar will provide an introduction to desert biogeography and culture, using Namibia as a case study. During the seminar, students will each give two presentations on aspects of desert biogeography and ecology, specific organisms and their adaptations to arid environments, cultural adaptations of indigenous peoples and immigrants, ecological threats and conservation efforts, and/or nat more »
Desert environments make up a third of the land areas on Earth, ranging from the hottest to the coldest environments. Aridity leads to the development of unique adaptations among the organisms that inhabit them. Climate change and other processes of desertification as well as increasing human demand for habitable and cultivatable areas have resulting in increasing need to better understand these systems. Namibia is a model system for studying these processes and includes the Sossuvlei (Sand Sea) World Heritable Site. This seminar will prepare students for their overseas field experience in Namibia. The seminar will provide an introduction to desert biogeography and culture, using Namibia as a case study. During the seminar, students will each give two presentations on aspects of desert biogeography and ecology, specific organisms and their adaptations to arid environments, cultural adaptations of indigenous peoples and immigrants, ecological threats and conservation efforts, and/or national and international policy towards deserts. Additional assignments include a comprehensive dossier and a final exam. Students will also carry out background research for the presentations they will be giving during the field seminar where access to the internet and to other scholarly resources will be limited. In addition, we will cover logistics, health and safety, cultural sensitivity, geography, and politics. We will deal with post-field issues such as reverse culture shock, and ways in which participants can consolidate and build up their abroad experiences after they return to campus.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Siegel, R. (PI)

HUMBIO 155C: Human and Viruses Part III (MI 155C)

Comprehensive survey of human virology integrating epidemiology, molecular biology, clinical sciences, social sciences, history, and the arts. Emphasis on host pathogen interactions and policy issues. Prerequisite: prior enrollment MI 155A/ HUMBIO 155H and MI 155B/ HUMBIO 155V and concurrent enrollment with MI 155D.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Siegel, R. (PI)

HUMBIO 155D: Human and Viruses Part IV (MI 155D)

Comprehensive survey of human virology integrating epidemiology, molecular biology, clinical sciences, social sciences, history, and the arts. Emphasis on host pathogen interactions and policy issues. Prerequisite: prior enrollment in MI 155A/ HUMBIO 155H and MI 155B/ HUMBIO 155V and concurrent enrollment with MI155C.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Siegel, R. (PI)

HUMBIO 155H: Humans and Viruses I (MI 155A)

Introduction to human virology integrating epidemiology, molecular biology, clinical sciences, social sciences, history, and the arts. Emphasis is on host pathogen interactions and policy issues. Topics: polio and vaccination, smallpox and eradication, yellow fever and history, influenza and genomic diversity, rubella and childhood infections, adenovirus and viral morphology, ebola and emerging infection, lassa fever and immune response. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in MI 155B or HUMBIO 155V.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Siegel, R. (PI)

HUMBIO 155V: Humans and Viruses II (MI 155B)

Introduction to human virology integrating epidemiology, molecular biology, clinical sciences, social sciences, history, and the arts. Emphasis on host pathogen interactions and policy issues. Topics: measles and viral epidemiology, rotavirus and world health, rabies and infections of the brain, HPV and cancer -causing viruses, herpes simplex and viral latency, CMV and viral teratogenesis, retrovirology and endogenous viral sequences, HIV and viral treatement, viral hepatitis and chronic infections, prions and diseases of life style. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment with MI155A or HUMBIO 155H.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Siegel, R. (PI)

HUMBIO 193: Research in Human Biology

Independent research conducted under faculty supervision, in junior or senior year, normally but not necessarily in pursuit of an honors project. May be taken for a maximum 3 quarters of credit. Prerequisite: Faculty approval; application available in student services office.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

HUMBIO 194: Honors

Restricted to Human Biology majors. Completion of the honors project, normally taken in the student's final quarter. First component: the honors thesis, a final paper providing evidence of rigorous research, fully referenced, and written in an accepted scientific style. Second component: participation in the honors symposium, including a 10-minute oral presentation followed by a brief question and answer session. Prerequisites: 193 or 199, and acceptance into the honors program.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HUMBIO 199: Directed Reading/Special Projects

Human Biology majors must obtain a sponsor from the Human Biology associated faculty or the Academic Council. Non-majors and students who have not declared must obtain a sponsor only from the Human Biology associated faculty. Students must complete application in student services office.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

MI 27SC: Viruses in the News

Viruses are unique biological entities that resemble both living and inanimate objects. Despite their simple structure they include some of the most devastating and ubiquitous causes of human disease. The compelling nature of this topic is illustrated by the recent Ebola epidemic, which emerged coincident with the last time this class was offered. From smallpox to measles to HIV to the common cold, viruses have literally changed the course of human history and impacted evolution. They have also been important experimental tools for probing the molecular nature of key biological processes, and they have been utilized in many key discoveries and Nobel Prize-winning research programs. In books, movies, newspapers, and electronic feeds, viruses continue to make the news on a daily basis. Using contemporary media, content experts, model building, interactive sessions, and field trips, we will explore the essential nature of viruses, what makes them unique, how they are classified, how they cause disease, key molecular processes, breakthroughs in prevention and treatment, current efforts in trying to eradicate viruses, and cultural iconography pertaining to viruses. In short, this seminar is intended to go viral. Sophomore College course, applications required, due at noon on April 5, 2016. Apply at http://soco.stanford.edu .
Terms: Sum | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Siegel, R. (PI)
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