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11 - 20 of 21 results for: Race & Crime

LAW 2006: Race, Class, and Punishment

Since the early 1970s, the criminal justice system in the United States has expanded dramatically. America has adopted an array of increasingly tough approaches to crime, including aggressive street-level policing, longer sentences, and a range of collateral consequences for criminal convictions. As a result, there are currently 2.2 million persons in prisons and jails and seven million under some form of correctional supervision. The impact on communities of color has been especially profound: In many of our nation's cities, nearly one-half of young black men are in the criminal justice system. This seminar will begin with readings discussing the tough-on-crime era's historical roots. We will then turn to examine the impact of these policies. Finally, we will turn to current efforts to resist and reform the system that has been created. This portion of the seminar will focus on violent crime, and whether and how to respond to violent crime differently than we currently do. The assigned reading will be substantial, and will come from a wide variety of sources, including history, sociology, political science, criminology, and law. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Class Participation, Written Assignments, Final Paper.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2017 | Units: 3 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail

LAW 2015: Advanced Criminal Law

The intensity of the current debates over criminal law and criminal justice policy is at an unusually high level, with strong and conflicting positions being staked out in the areas of race and crime, policing, incarceration and sentencing, drug policy, and guns. We will be discussing these topics with a mixture of doctrinal analysis of key issues, review of secondary commentaries on key aspects of criminal justice policy, and analysis of empirical papers that illuminate important elements relevant to these legal and policy debates. Elements used in grading: Grading will be based on attendance, class participation, one-to-two-page response papers to readings, and three six-page papers on topics distilled from each of the three three-week blocks in the course.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail
Instructors: Donohue, J. (PI)

LAW 3504: History of American Law

(Formerly Law 318) This course examines the growth and development of American legal institutions with particular attention to crime and punishment, slavery and race relations, the role of law in developing the economy, and the place of lawyers in American society, from colonial times to the present. Special Instructions: Any student may write a paper in lieu of the final exam with consent of instructor. After the term begins, students accepted into the course can transfer from section (01) into section (02), which meets the R requirement, with consent of the instructor. Elements used in grading: Final exam or paper. Automatic grading penalty waived for writers. Cross-listed with History ( HISTORY 152 - Consent of instructor required) & ( HISTORY 352B).
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail
Instructors: Friedman, L. (PI)

POLISCI 124S: Civil Liberties: Judicial Politics and Constitutional Law

The role and participation of courts, primarily the U.S. Supreme Court, in public policy making and the political system. Judicial activity in civil liberty areas (religious liberty, free expression, race and sex discrimination, political participation, and rights of persons accused of crime). Prerequisites: 2 or equivalent, and sophomore standing.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Autumn 2012 | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PSYCH 259: Race and Crime

The goal of this course is to examine social psychological perspectives on race, crime, and punishment in the United States. Readings will be drawn not only from psychology, but also from sociology, criminology, political science, and legal studies. We will consider the manner in which social psychological variables can operate at various points in the criminal justice system - from policing, to sentencing, to imprisonment. Limited enrollment. Interested students should complete an application for permission at https://tinyurl.com/PSYCH259-2018 and attend the first day of class.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PUBLPOL 221: Sentencing, Corrections, and Criminal Justice Policy (CSRE 221)

This introductory course will familiarize students with the history, structure, and performance of America's sentencing and corrections system. Sentencing is the process by which criminal sanctions are imposed in individual cases following criminal convictions. Corrections deals with the implementation and evaluation of criminal sentences after they are handed down. In fact, the two subject areas are inseparable. The course will examine sentencing and corrections from global and historical views, from theoretical and policy perspectives, and with close attention to many problem-specific areas. We will explore sentencing theories and their application, the nature, scope and function of corrections, the impact of mass incarceration on crime and communities, the effectiveness of rehabilitation, the relationship between sanctions and crime, and the consequences of prisoner reentry. These topics will be considered as they play out in current political and policy debates. Guest lectures may more »
This introductory course will familiarize students with the history, structure, and performance of America's sentencing and corrections system. Sentencing is the process by which criminal sanctions are imposed in individual cases following criminal convictions. Corrections deals with the implementation and evaluation of criminal sentences after they are handed down. In fact, the two subject areas are inseparable. The course will examine sentencing and corrections from global and historical views, from theoretical and policy perspectives, and with close attention to many problem-specific areas. We will explore sentencing theories and their application, the nature, scope and function of corrections, the impact of mass incarceration on crime and communities, the effectiveness of rehabilitation, the relationship between sanctions and crime, and the consequences of prisoner reentry. These topics will be considered as they play out in current political and policy debates. Guest lectures may include presentations by legal professionals, victims, offenders, and correctional leaders. We also plan to visit a correctional facility. This course is open to 1Ls, 2Ls, and 3Ls in the Law School. Special Instructions: Grades will be based on class participation, and either: (1) three reflection papers of 5 to 7 pages each, or (2) a longer research paper. After the term begins, students accepted into the course can transfer from section (01) into section (02) which meets the research (R) requirement, with consent of the instructor. Elements used in grading: Class participation, reflection papers or research paper. Cross-listed with Comparative Studies in Race & Ethnicity ( CSRE 221) and open to Juniors and Seniors, Law ( LAW 621), Public Policy ( PUBLPOL 221).
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2016 | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

SOC 135D: Law and Inequality

How does social welfare policy contribute to social (in)justice? Why does discrimination based on race face heightened scrutiny in court compared to gender? Does inequality cause crime? This course explores the intersection between sociology and the law with a focus on inequality. We will address the question: how does the law create and respond to inequality between people and groups? We will learn some legal doctrine throughout but we will prioritize examining a sociological theory of law and justice. This course takes an interdisciplinary approach using a variety of materials including judicial opinions, scholarly papers, and newspaper articles.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Huhn, M. (PI)

SOC 156A: The Changing American City (CSRE 156, SOC 256A, URBANST 156A)

After decades of decline, U.S. cities today are undergoing major transformations. Young professionals, Millenials, and members of the creative class are flocking to cities. Massive waves of immigration have transformed the racial and ethnic compositions of cities and their neighborhoods. Public housing projects that once defined the inner city are disappearing, and the recent housing boom and bust shook up the urban landscape. This class will include readings and discussion on contemporary developments in U.S. cities and how they relate to race, ethnicity, and class. Topics include immigration, gentrification, crime, public housing, and the housing crisis.
Terms: not given next year, last offered Autumn 2017 | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

SOC 256A: The Changing American City (CSRE 156, SOC 156A, URBANST 156A)

After decades of decline, U.S. cities today are undergoing major transformations. Young professionals, Millenials, and members of the creative class are flocking to cities. Massive waves of immigration have transformed the racial and ethnic compositions of cities and their neighborhoods. Public housing projects that once defined the inner city are disappearing, and the recent housing boom and bust shook up the urban landscape. This class will include readings and discussion on contemporary developments in U.S. cities and how they relate to race, ethnicity, and class. Topics include immigration, gentrification, crime, public housing, and the housing crisis.
Terms: not given next year, last offered Autumn 2017 | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

SOC 349: Race, Space, and Stratification

Racial and ethnic stratification has been a defining yet shifting feature of U.S. society, and such inequalities shape and are shaped by the ecological structure of places. This course is a survey course for doctoral students covering sociological scholarship at the intersection of racial stratification and urban sociology. The class will include foundational readings and discussions on urban sociological theories, urban decline and suburbanization, segregation, poverty, neighborhood effects, crime and disorder, gentrification, and immigration. The course will also include discussion of new and innovative data sources and methods for research in this area throughout the quarter. Students will develop or continue a research project designed to contribute to scholarship on racial stratification and urban sociology.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Hwang, J. (PI)
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