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41 - 50 of 51 results for: PWR

PWR 2SI: Writing & Rhetoric 2: The Rhetoric of Privilege

Prerequisite: PWR 1. Drawing from academic articles, newspaper and magazine stories, social media, television, and film, we will examine rhetoric in moments like the Rio Olympics to bring to the forefront the privilege that lies beneath. We will analyze various forms of privilege and their intersections, from race and gender to socioeconomic class, sexual orientation, citizenship, physical ability, and so on. We will also scrutinize our own privilege as part of the Stanford community. For more information about PWR 2, see https://undergrad.stanford.edu/programs/pwr/courses/pwr-2. For full course descriptions, see https://vcapwr-catalog.stanford.edu. Enrollment is handled by the PWR office.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: Writing 2
Instructors: Ives, S. (PI)

PWR 2SN: Writing & Rhetoric 2: Rhetoric of Activism

Prerequisite: PWR 1. This course examines the role of rhetoric in discussions surrounding political inactivity as well as the burgeoning activism of today. Quintessential to our investigation of the rhetorical modes of activism is our exploration of varied and often contesting definitions of "democracy" and "civic engagement." For more information about PWR 2, see https://undergrad.stanford.edu/programs/pwr/courses/pwr-2. For full course descriptions, see https://vcapwr-catalog.stanford.edu. Enrollment is handled by the PWR office.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: Writing 2
Instructors: Hervey, S. (PI)

PWR 2ST: Writing & Rhetoric 2: Science, Democracy and Social Media

Prerequisite: PWR 1. Social media have greatly enlivened and democratized science communication so that it now moves between scientists and various audiences. Scientific content is no longer static, nor is it merely for advanced researchers. Scientists using social media are learning to assess content collaboratively to help provide better science in public communication. One of the particular obligations of university science students is to join the conversation, help review and revise content in the public sphere. Students in this course will actively engage in the evolving world of science communication and practice their scientific writing, research and oral presentation skills. For more information about PWR 2, see https://undergrad.stanford.edu/programs/pwr/courses/pwr-2. For full course descriptions, see https://vcapwr-catalog.stanford.edu. Enrollment is handled by the PWR office.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: Writing 2
Instructors: Starkman, R. (PI)

PWR 2WG: Writing & Rhetoric 2: All That Jazz: The Rhetoric of American Musical Theater

Prerequisite: PWR 1. Building on a series of written assignments and oral presentations that culminate in a major research project, we'll explore the conventions and strategies that define the genre of American musical theater, analyzing how contemporary musicals mirror, revise, and even subvert these traditional rules. Watching musicals on film, reading reviews by theater critics, and attending a local production, we'll examine a range of cultural arguments made by American musicals. For more information about PWR 2, see https://undergrad.stanford.edu/programs/pwr/courses/pwr-2. For full course descriptions, see https://vcapwr-catalog.stanford.edu. Enrollment is handled by the PWR office.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: Writing 2

PWR 5: Independent Writing

Individual writing project under the guidance of a PWR instructor. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: first two levels of the writing requirement or equivalent transfer credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit

PWR 6: Writing Workshop

Writing workshop for collaborative, group, and individual projects guided by a specific theme or genre.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3

PWR 91CL: Intermediate Writing: Self & Science

"Self & Science" mines the intersection of memoir and science writing. In this advanced experimental writing course, students will read a selection of essays by writers including Lewis Thomas, Oliver Sacks, Annie Dillard, and Mark Doty, which illustrate the shared intellectual foundation in observation of scientific and poetic inquiry. Building on these readings, students will be challenged to produce an experimental essay that transgresses genre boundaries in the service of considering how personal reflection can narrate researched discoveries. Over the course of the quarter, students are invited to bolster their overall communication acumen, enhance their ability to share valuable discoveries beyond the confines of their major discipline, and practice the difficult bliss of engaging a discerning public audience. Click here for course video and full description: https://undergrad.stanford.edu/programs/pwr/courses/advanced-courses/self-science
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE
Instructors: Lewis, C. (PI)

PWR 99A: Portfolio Preparation I

A 1-unit course introducing ePortfolios and folio thinking for students in the Notation in Science Communication (NSC). The course will assist students in designing a rhetorical ePortfolio and in selecting and reflecting on writing samples that represent student learning in science communication. This is the first of a two-part ePortfolio requirement for the NSC. For more information, see https://undergrad.stanford.edu/programs/pwr/explore/notation-science-writing.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 1

PWR 194SS: Topics in Writing & Rhetoric: Making Rhetoric Matter: Human Rights at Home (CSRE 194SS)

'Human rights' often sounds like it needs defending in far-off places: in distant public squares where soldiers menace gatherings of citizens, in dark jails where prisoners are tortured for their politics, in unknown streets where gender inequality has brutal consequences. But Bryan Stevenson, a lawyer fighting for social and racial justice in the jails of Alabama, proposes that we try 'proximity': that we get close to the injustices that are already close to us. This class thus takes human rights as a local issue, focusing on how terms like 'human' and 'rights' are interpreted on our campus and in our neighborhoods, cities, and region. Instead of a traditional human rights policy framework, we'll use the lens of intersectional ethics to explore specific rhetorical issues in gender politics, citizenship, higher education, police brutality, and mass incarceration. We will write, speak, and move across genres, responding to the work of incarcerated artists, creating embodied workshops, 'translating' ideas into new media (does someone you know need an animated video about gender pronouns? Or maybe it's time for a podcast about #PrisonRenaissance?), doing collaborative research, and 'writing back' to our audiences. For course video and full description see: https://undergrad.stanford.edu/programs/pwr/courses/advanced-courses/making-rhetoric-matter-human-rights-home.nnThis course is part of the PWR advanced elective track in Social and Racial Justice (SRJ). Prerequisite: first two levels of the writing requirement or equivalent transfer credit. For topics, see https://undergrad.stanford.edu/programs/pwr/courses/advanced-pwr-courses.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-ER

PWR 195: Writing Center Peer Tutor Seminar (PWR 295)

For students selected to serve as peer writing tutors in the Hume Center for Writing and Speaking and/or at other campus sites. Readings on and reflection about writing processes, the dynamics of writing and tutoring situations, tutoring techniques, learning styles, diversity, and ethics. Observation of tutoring sessions, written responses to readings, and other written work. Instructor permission required. WR 1 pre-/co-requisite.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-3
Instructors: Pittock, S. (PI)
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