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401 - 410 of 446 results for: PWR

PWR 91: Intermediate Writing

For students who have completed the first two levels of the writing requirement and want further work in developing writing abilities, especially within discipline-specific contexts and nonfiction genres. Individual conferences with instructor and peer workshops. Prerequisite: first two levels of the writing requirement or equivalent transfer credit. For topics, see http://www.stanford.edu/dept/undergrad/cgi-bin/drupal_pwr/advanced_pwr.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

PWR 91B: Intermediate Writing: Digital Rhetoric, New Media, and Transformations in Writing

Writing operates in multiple modes (word, image, sound) in the new media environment. Examples of texts - invention, drafting, revision, and communication - governed by the evolving conditions of a new, digital rhetoric.nnnFor students who have completed the first two levels of the writing requirement and want further work in developing writing abilities, especially within discipline-specific contexts and nonfiction genres. Individual conferences with instructor and peer workshops. Prerequisite: first two levels of the writing requirement or equivalent transfer credit. For more information, see http://www.stanford.edu/dept/undergrad/cgi-bin/drupal_pwr/advanced_pwr.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

PWR 91C: Intermediate Writing: The Stanford Daily Show

Class will study fake news programs such as the Daily Show, the Colbert Report and the Onion,and will produce The Stanford Daily Show, our own version of a fake news program.nnnFor students who have completed the first two levels of the writing requirement and want further work in developing writing abilities, especially within discipline-specific contexts and nonfiction genres. Individual conferences with instructor and peer workshops. Prerequisite: first two levels of the writing requirement or equivalent transfer credit. For more information, see http://www.stanford.edu/dept/undergrad/cgi-bin/drupal_pwr/advanced_pwr.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

PWR 91CG: Intermediate Writing: Science and Technology Writing for Popular Audiences

Whether you're a fuzzy or a techie, chances are you've had to explain the content of the classes you've taken to outside audiences. You've had to explain to your parents how your/their tuition dollars are at work, or you've advocated for your well-rounded background during a job interview. Your access to Stanford has granted you a certain expert label, even if it doesn't always feel that way. This course leverages your growing expertise by introducing you to writing styles and genres that will allow you to communicate your technical interests to a non-expert, or popular, audience. We'll talk about stylistic points including story ledes and anecdotes, metaphor, and organizing familiar and non-familiar language in our writing. We'll also experiment with different genres that accomplish these translation goals by experimenting with writing abstracts, journalism pieces, provocative podcasts, first-person narratives, visual essays, and creative non-fiction essays. Our ultimate goal will be to not only better understand these styles and genres in order to communicate more effectively with a wide variety of audiences, but to also seek publication in local newspapers, blogs, and sources such as Salon, Slate, The Huffington Post, The Atlantic, and even Wired or Radiolab.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2015 | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

PWR 91CL: Intermediate Writing: Self & Science

"Self & Science" mines the intersection of memoir and science writing. In this advanced experimental writing course, students will read a selection of essays by writers including Lewis Thomas, Oliver Sacks, Annie Dillard, and Mark Doty, which illustrate the shared intellectual foundation in observation of scientific and poetic inquiry. Building on these readings, students will be challenged to produce an experimental essay that transgresses genre boundaries in the service of considering how personal reflection can narrate researched discoveries. Over the course of the quarter, students are invited to bolster their overall communication acumen, enhance their ability to share valuable discoveries beyond the confines of their major discipline, and practice the difficult bliss of engaging a discerning public audience. Click here for course video and full description: https://undergrad.stanford.edu/programs/pwr/courses/advanced-courses/self-science
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2017 | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

PWR 91CW: Intermediate Writing: Seeing is Believing

In this course, students will study and practice techniques and rhetorics of data visualization based on principles of rhetorical history, visual rhetorics and graphic design as well as cognitive science, design thinking, and other disciplines that inform critical conversations around information display and data visualization. For more information visit https://undergrad.stanford.edu/programs/pwr/courses/additional-elective-courses/seeing-isand-believing-rhetoric-big-data-visualization.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2018 | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

PWR 91D: Intermediate Writing: Your American Life

In this course, you¿ll read and listen to some of the most moving and insightful pieces of the last decade, explore the important differences between print and oral storytelling, and then script and record your own full-length audio piece. Along the way, we will explore many craft elements that apply equally to print and audio pieces. You will learn, for example, how to organize your material, choose an effective structure, blend dramatization and reflection, ground insights in concrete scenes, create a strong narrative arc, and manage elements such as characterization, description, and dialogue. We will also, of course, explore craft elements unique to the audio form and you will learn how to use your voice and other sonic elements to craft the kind of piece you might hear on This American Life.nnThrough a special arrangement with the Stanford Storytelling Project, in the spring of 2012 this course will feature special sessions with prominent contributors to This American Life. n Prerequisite: first two levels of the writing requirement or equivalent transfer credit. For more information, see http://www.stanford.edu/dept/undergrad/cgi-bin/drupal_pwr/advanced_pwr.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Autumn 2013 | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

PWR 91E: Intermediate Writing: The Oral Tradition: Myth, Folklore, and Fairy Tale

Contemporary storytelling covers a variety of media - from movies to novels, theatre and beyond. What this course offers is an in depth study of the roots of that practice - the oral tradition.nnnOver the course we will explore many different motifs and structures that arise in the oral tradition, myth, folklore and fairy tale. What universal themes do we detect, and what separates the progression of a pacific north west Trickster story from an Arthurian romance? Why is it that in the early twenty first century many of our most acclaimed art forms carry narrative forms that are thousands of years old? Star Wars, Lord of the Rings and the recent broadway show Jerusalem, all follow scenic progressions informed by myth.nnnThe first encounter with the story will be an oral narrative - the myth told unscripted in the classroom. The stories, which range from the Arthurian romance Parzival to Trickster folk tales, will be told in several sections - with a running exegesis and student response more »
Contemporary storytelling covers a variety of media - from movies to novels, theatre and beyond. What this course offers is an in depth study of the roots of that practice - the oral tradition.nnnOver the course we will explore many different motifs and structures that arise in the oral tradition, myth, folklore and fairy tale. What universal themes do we detect, and what separates the progression of a pacific north west Trickster story from an Arthurian romance? Why is it that in the early twenty first century many of our most acclaimed art forms carry narrative forms that are thousands of years old? Star Wars, Lord of the Rings and the recent broadway show Jerusalem, all follow scenic progressions informed by myth.nnnThe first encounter with the story will be an oral narrative - the myth told unscripted in the classroom. The stories, which range from the Arthurian romance Parzival to Trickster folk tales, will be told in several sections - with a running exegesis and student response alongside. Many of these stories are now transcripts and have become works of literature. We will explore both the complementary aspects of this development, and areas of tension.nnnDuring the course each student will embark on a project that demonstrates a thorough understanding of the topics covered, and utilizes those elements in their wider practice of writing and rhetoric. nnnThe project will be to research a story handed down within the family - an adventure of some distant relative, or a family migration from one country to another. Factoring in elements from the taught class, the student will mythologize the story: by writing an in depth commentary on its implications - factoring in contemporary, psychological and metaphorical associations. The second element will be to tell the story to the class. In these way we experience myth as a living principle, not something just from `a long time ago.¿
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2014 | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

PWR 91EC: Intermediate Writing: Farmers, Scientists, & Activists: Public Discourse of Food Economies

What are the possibilities in rethinking our food, the way we talk about it, the way we grow it, and the way we eat it? In this course, you will be paired with local organizations concerned with food economies, such as food activists, food banks, farmers, and farm collectives, to collaboratively draft and produce writing specific to the client. You will analyze and respond to a variety of professional writing situations, and practice project management, focusing on benchmarking and deliverables. The end result will be a multimodal, collaboratively-produced document or set of documents you can add to your public-facing portfolios. Students taking this courses as part of the Notation in Science Communication can include their final project in their NSC e-portfolio. This course fulfills the advanced PWR requirement for the Notation in Science Communication (NSC). Prerequisite: first two levels of the writing requirement or equivalent transfer credit. For video course description, see https://undergrad.stanford.edu/programs/pwr/courses/advanced-courses/farmers-scientists-activists-public-discourse-food-economies. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2017 | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

PWR 91EE: Intermediate Writing: Saving Lives with Picture Books

Want to help improve the health of mothers and young children in Bangladesh by creating picture books? This is your chance. (No artistic skills required.) You and your classmates will collaboratively create at least one original picture book designed to communicate information about child stimulation, nutrition, water sanitation, hygiene, the dangers of lead, and healthy ways of thinking. You¿ll study the genre of the picture book, explore the culture of Bangladesh, and consult with a team of Stanford-led researchers to create at least one picture book. You¿ll pitch story ideas, create storyboards and dummies, and revise and edit in light of feedback from the team in Bangladesh, as well as some of the mothers participating in the study.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Ellis, E. (PI)
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