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281 - 290 of 306 results for: PWR

PWR 91C: Intermediate Writing: The Stanford Daily Show

Class will study fake news programs such as the Daily Show, the Colbert Report and the Onion,and will produce The Stanford Daily Show, our own version of a fake news program.nnnFor students who have completed the first two levels of the writing requirement and want further work in developing writing abilities, especially within discipline-specific contexts and nonfiction genres. Individual conferences with instructor and peer workshops. Prerequisite: first two levels of the writing requirement or equivalent transfer credit. For more information, see http://www.stanford.edu/dept/undergrad/cgi-bin/drupal_pwr/advanced_pwr.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

PWR 91CG: Intermediate Writing: Science and Technology Writing for Popular Audiences

Whether you're a fuzzy or a techie, chances are you've had to explain the content of the classes you've taken to outside audiences. You've had to explain to your parents how your/their tuition dollars are at work, or you've advocated for your well-rounded background during a job interview. Your access to Stanford has granted you a certain expert label, even if it doesn't always feel that way. This course leverages your growing expertise by introducing you to writing styles and genres that will allow you to communicate your technical interests to a non-expert, or popular, audience. We'll talk about stylistic points including story ledes and anecdotes, metaphor, and organizing familiar and non-familiar language in our writing. We'll also experiment with different genres that accomplish these translation goals by experimenting with writing abstracts, journalism pieces, provocative podcasts, first-person narratives, visual essays, and creative non-fiction essays. Our ultimate goal will be to not only better understand these styles and genres in order to communicate more effectively with a wide variety of audiences, but to also seek publication in local newspapers, blogs, and sources such as Salon, Slate, The Huffington Post, The Atlantic, and even Wired or Radiolab.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

PWR 91CL: Intermediate Writing: Creative Inquiry: New Genres for Science Writing

Despite the widespread assumption that scientists are weak communicators, many of today¿s most celebrated essayists hail from backgrounds in the hard sciences. Physician, poet and essayist, Lewis Thomas inspires readers to delve into the etymology of scientific discovery, and, in doing so, prompts radical reconsiderations of the cultural significance of innovation. Similarly, neurologist and writer, Oliver Sacks¿ compassionate ruminations on mental disability advance fresh thinking on the nature of difference. Inversely, many essayists hailing from ¿fuzzy¿ backgrounds, deploy techniques usually associated with scientific observation to electrify their prose: To wit, the works of brilliant stylists like Annie Dillard, Chang-rae Lee, and Mark Doty are characterized by the kind of deep observation that underpins scientific inquiry. These writers, like scientists, are first and foremost good at really looking.

nnIn this course, we will delve into a fluid, yet rigorous, research process based on the art of observation. Each student will begin the quarter by posing a question of personal or professional significance about how some aspect of the natural, social, technological or cultural world works. Using these questions as a starting point, students will then design a research process to first complicate, and then perhaps also answer, their initial question. The end product of the inquiry will be a self-fashioned experimental essay that can engage a discerning public audience. This is the perfect class for techies, wonks, and data junkies who want to cultivate the poet¿s cherished sensibilities.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

PWR 91D: Intermediate Writing: Your American Life

In this course, you¿ll read and listen to some of the most moving and insightful pieces of the last decade, explore the important differences between print and oral storytelling, and then script and record your own full-length audio piece. Along the way, we will explore many craft elements that apply equally to print and audio pieces. You will learn, for example, how to organize your material, choose an effective structure, blend dramatization and reflection, ground insights in concrete scenes, create a strong narrative arc, and manage elements such as characterization, description, and dialogue. We will also, of course, explore craft elements unique to the audio form and you will learn how to use your voice and other sonic elements to craft the kind of piece you might hear on This American Life.nnThrough a special arrangement with the Stanford Storytelling Project, in the spring of 2012 this course will feature special sessions with prominent contributors to This American Life. n Prerequisite: first two levels of the writing requirement or equivalent transfer credit. For more information, see http://www.stanford.edu/dept/undergrad/cgi-bin/drupal_pwr/advanced_pwr.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

PWR 91E: Intermediate Writing: The Oral Tradition: Myth, Folklore, and Fairy Tale

Contemporary storytelling covers a variety of media - from movies to novels, theatre and beyond. What this course offers is an in depth study of the roots of that practice - the oral tradition.nnnOver the course we will explore many different motifs and structures that arise in the oral tradition, myth, folklore and fairy tale. What universal themes do we detect, and what separates the progression of a pacific north west Trickster story from an Arthurian romance? Why is it that in the early twenty first century many of our most acclaimed art forms carry narrative forms that are thousands of years old? Star Wars, Lord of the Rings and the recent broadway show Jerusalem, all follow scenic progressions informed by myth.nnnThe first encounter with the story will be an oral narrative - the myth told unscripted in the classroom. The stories, which range from the Arthurian romance Parzival to Trickster folk tales, will be told in several sections - with a running exegesis and student response alongside. Many of these stories are now transcripts and have become works of literature. We will explore both the complementary aspects of this development, and areas of tension.nnnDuring the course each student will embark on a project that demonstrates a thorough understanding of the topics covered, and utilizes those elements in their wider practice of writing and rhetoric. nnnThe project will be to research a story handed down within the family - an adventure of some distant relative, or a family migration from one country to another. Factoring in elements from the taught class, the student will mythologize the story: by writing an in depth commentary on its implications - factoring in contemporary, psychological and metaphorical associations. The second element will be to tell the story to the class. In these way we experience myth as a living principle, not something just from `a long time ago.¿
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

PWR 91EP: Intermediate Writing: Communicating Climate Change: Navigating the Stories from the Frontlines (EARTHSYS 154)

In the next two decades floods, droughts and famine caused by climate change will displace more than 250 million people around the world. In this course students will develop an increased understanding of how different stakeholders including scientists, aid organizations, locals, policy makers, activists, and media professionals communicate the climate change crisis. They will select a site experiencing the devastating effects and research the voices telling the stories of those sites and the audiences who are (or are not) listening. Students might want to investigate drought-ridden areas such as the Central Valley of California or Darfur, Sudan; Alpine glaciers melting in the Alps or in Alaska; the increasingly flooded Pacific islands; the hurricane ravaged Gulf Coast, among many others. Data from various stakeholders will be analyzed and synthesized for a magazine length article designed to bring attention to a region and/or issue that has previously been neglected. Students will write and submit their article for publication.nnFor students who have completed the first two levels of the writing requirement and want further work in developing writing abilities, especially within discipline-specific contexts and nonfiction genres. Individual conferences with instructor and peer workshops. Prerequisite: first two levels of the writing requirement or equivalent transfer credit. For more information, see https://undergrad.stanford.edu/programs/pwr/explore/notation-science-writing.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Polk, E. (PI)

PWR 91F: Finding Your Story

Life challenges us to become aware of the stories that shape us--family stories, cultural mythologies, even popular movies, television shows, and songs--and then create and live our own story. We face this challenge throughout our lives but perhaps most acutely as we move into adulthood; this is the period when we most need to become conscious of stories and their power, to gather wisdom, practices, and resources for finding our own story. This class, designed with seniors in mind, will illuminate and explore these resources and give you the opportunity to reflect deeply, in discussion and writing, on what truly calls to you in this life. We will engage with some of the world's great stories--myths, parables, teaching tales, modern fiction, even aphorisms, koans, and riddles. In them we can find both elements that resonate with our own story and provocations that help us unearth and cultivate our native gifts--the genius in each of us. We will look at short excerpts from masterworks and myths from around the world, all voices in the largest conversation we have as humans, the one that asks: who am I? why am I here? what truly matters? how can I be happy? Together we will investigate how these stories, and stories like them, can be used to help us find our own story. Students in this course will have a special opportunity to meet personally with poet Billy Collins and singer Aimee Mann when they visit campus in April. Does not fulfill NSC requirement. For students who have completed the first level of the writing requirement and want further work in developing writing abilities, especially within discipline-specific contexts and nonfiction genres. Individual conferences with instructor and peer workshops. Prerequisite: first level of the writing requirement or equivalent transfer credit. For more information, see http://www.stanford.edu/dept/undergrad/cgi-bin/drupal_pwr/advanced_pwr.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

PWR 91JS: Intermediate Writing: Stanford Science Podcast

Effective communication of expert knowledge in the sciences to non-specialist audiences. Project-based work on a range and variety of communication challenges, contexts, and media. For students who have completed the first two levels of the writing requirement and want further work in developing writing abilities, especially within discipline-specific contexts and nonfiction genres. Individual conferences with instructor and peer workshops. Prerequisite: first two levels of the writing requirement or equivalent transfer credit. For more information, see https://undergrad.stanford.edu/programs/pwr/explore/notation-science-writing.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2015 | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

PWR 91KS: Intermediate Writing: Design Thinking and Science Communication

Effective communication of expert knowledge in the sciences to non-specialist audiences. Project-based work on a range and variety of communication challenges, contexts, and media. For students who have completed the first two levels of the writing requirement and want further work in developing writing abilities, especially within discipline-specific contexts and nonfiction genres. Individual conferences with instructor and peer workshops. Prerequisite: first two levels of the writing requirement or equivalent transfer credit. For more information, see https://undergrad.stanford.edu/programs/pwr/explore/notation-science-writing.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Savelson, K. (PI)

PWR 91NSC: Intermediate Writing: Introduction to Science Communication

With the growing impact of science and technology on our society, the emphasis on communicating that science well has never been greater. But what is effective science communication? Is it ever ok to use jargon? Is it ok to say "I" in my research report? How do I communicate complex topics in simple, but accurate, ways? In this course, we will explore the variety of formats that science communication can take--from technical research papers on particle physics to children's books about genetics. We will explore how different audiences shape the way science is communicated, and we will develop a set of best practices for effective science communication. Students will then apply these strategies in their own science communication projects. Prerequisite: first two levels of the writing requirement or equivalent transfer credit. For more information, see https://undergrad.stanford.edu/programs/pwr/explore/nsc. Required of students admitted into the Notation for Science Communication after January 2015.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
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