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11 - 20 of 30 results for: PSYC ; Currently searching winter courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

PSYC 215B: Introduction to Psychedelic Medicine

The re-emergence of psychedelics has opened new explorations of brain, mind, and the treatment of mental illness. Research studies are underway globally investigating potential applications of psychedelics. This course will survey ongoing and developing scientific instigations and clinical applications of psychedelics and psychedelic-assisted treatments. Neuroscientific, clinical and psychological perspectives will be discussed as well as historical, legal, and cultural aspects of psychedelic medicine. Presentations will be given by the field's researchers and clinicians. Attendees will be able to engage directly with speakers during the course. Course may be taken for one unit (lecture, 6:30PM-7:30PM) and attend attendance discussion section (7:30PM-8:30PM) for two units.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Repeatable 1 times (up to 4 units total)

PSYC 225: Mentorship and Clinical Engagement in Child/Adolescent and Adult Psychiatry

A mentoring program designed to expose first and second-year medical students to the rewarding fields of child/adolescent and adult psychiatry, and to increase awareness and education about child/adolescent and adult mental health issues. The early years of medical training consist primarily of didactic instruction, an almost universal challenge for students who enter medicine desiring to help and interact with patients. To increase engagement with the field, we bring clinical psychiatry to preclinical students, by interacting with patients and families, as follows. During our weekly seminar time, we interview a patient and family one week, then offer a debriefing, Q&A session the following week. The seminar includes open discussion, addressing questions about specific interactions with the child/adolescent or adult, diagnoses, and therapies used for treatment. Responses to students¿ questions invariably address evidence-based approaches to assessment and treatment of specific disorder more »
A mentoring program designed to expose first and second-year medical students to the rewarding fields of child/adolescent and adult psychiatry, and to increase awareness and education about child/adolescent and adult mental health issues. The early years of medical training consist primarily of didactic instruction, an almost universal challenge for students who enter medicine desiring to help and interact with patients. To increase engagement with the field, we bring clinical psychiatry to preclinical students, by interacting with patients and families, as follows. During our weekly seminar time, we interview a patient and family one week, then offer a debriefing, Q&A session the following week. The seminar includes open discussion, addressing questions about specific interactions with the child/adolescent or adult, diagnoses, and therapies used for treatment. Responses to students¿ questions invariably address evidence-based approaches to assessment and treatment of specific disorders, such as depression, anxiety, eating disorders, autism, and attentional disorders. We also facilitate opportunities for the students to get involved in cutting-edge scientific research, networking/collaborating (including with medical students and faculty around the world), and attending professional conferences. The course is offered during autumn, winter and spring quarters and is intended as a longitudinal seminar to be taken continuously across these quarters. Medical students who cannot attend three quarters may enroll with permission of the instructor. Non-medical students interested in the course should contact the instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit

PSYC 229B: Topics in Neurodiversity: Introduction and Advocacy, Part 2

This is part 2 of a year-long course which provides students with the foundation, knowledge, and essential skills for understanding, engaging with, and advocating for the neurodiverse population. In addition, this course will also provide direct instruction to students in the areas of activities of daily living (ADLs), social communication strategies, navigating social relationships, self-regulation, support in accommodations, and support in career development.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 2 units total)

PSYC 233: Mindfulness: An Awareness-Based Stress Reduction Program in Medicine

An experiential program in which the participants learn the techniques of mindfulness meditation and its application in the management of stress and in healthcare. Modeled after the MBSR, Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction, started by Jon Kabat-Zinn at UMASS Medical Center. Designed to work with the mind/body relationship to stress and chronic illness teaching open sensitive awareness without judgement of mental or physical reactivity. Requirement for the course is the daily practice of mindfulness meditation, attendance at weekly class meetings and the all day retreat, home reading, and a final paper covering the student's observations.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 3

PSYC 235: Dement's Sleep and Dreams (PSYC 135)

Dr. William Dement created Sleep and Dreams in 1971, the world¿s first university course devoted to the science of sleep. Upon his retirement he selected Dr. Rafael Pelayo to be his successor, but he continued to participate in class until his passing in the summer of 2020. To honor his legacy in perpetuity, Dr.Pelayo renamed the course ¿Dement¿s Sleep Dreams¿ as he had promised him he would. The goal is to retain the original spirit of the course as the content is continuously updated to reflect current state of sleep science. The course is designed to impart essential knowledge of the neuroscience of sleep and covers how sleep affects our daily lives. The course covers normal sleep and dreams, as well as common sleep disorders. Course content empowers students to make educated decisions concerning sleep and alertness for the rest of their lives and shapes students' attitudes about the importance of sleep. Students will keep track of their sleep patterns during the course. They will also participate in an outreach project to help improve awareness of the importance of sleep heath in our community. Undergraduates must enroll in PSYC 135, while graduate students should enroll in PSYC 235.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 3

PSYC 250: Methodology of Research in Behavioral Sciences

Statistical and methodological issues in three major psychiatric research themes: clinical psychiatric research (Aut), neuroimaging research (Win), and statistical genetics and general statistical modeling (Spr). Autumn series includes: basics of inferential statistics, group comparison, analysis of variance, regression analysis, multivariate analysis, and longitudinal analysis in the context of psychiatric and behavioral research. Also included are conceptual topics such as risk factors, mediation, moderation, and causal inference. Winter series includes: functional and structural neuroimaging research methods (e.g. functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), structural MRI (sMRI), diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), electroencephalogram (EEG)). Basic principles, statistical analysis methods, advantages and limitations, and applications are discussed. Spring series includes: tests and effect estimation for multi more »
Statistical and methodological issues in three major psychiatric research themes: clinical psychiatric research (Aut), neuroimaging research (Win), and statistical genetics and general statistical modeling (Spr). Autumn series includes: basics of inferential statistics, group comparison, analysis of variance, regression analysis, multivariate analysis, and longitudinal analysis in the context of psychiatric and behavioral research. Also included are conceptual topics such as risk factors, mediation, moderation, and causal inference. Winter series includes: functional and structural neuroimaging research methods (e.g. functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), structural MRI (sMRI), diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), electroencephalogram (EEG)). Basic principles, statistical analysis methods, advantages and limitations, and applications are discussed. Spring series includes: tests and effect estimation for multiple SNPs, genes or pathways in genetic association studies, gene-gene interactions, twins and heritability estimates, Hardy-Weinberg and linkage equilibrium, interpretation and presentation of results for a range of statistical models for different types of data. Practical examples from recent research within the Department of Psychiatry will be used throughout the course. Prerequisite: Some exposure to statistical methods, either from course work or from participation in research having some behavioral aspects, or consent of instructor. 1 unit for class participation only, 2 units includes weekly assignments, 3 units includes a final project.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit

PSYC 290: Teaching in Psychiatry

Practical experience in teaching by serving as a teaching assistant in a psychiatry course. Unit values are allotted individually to reflect the level of teaching responsibility assigned to the student.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Aboujaoude, E. (PI) ; Adamson, M. (PI) ; Adelsheim, S. (PI) ; Agras, W. (PI) ; Albucher, R. (PI) ; Apple, R. (PI) ; Arnow, B. (PI) ; Ashford, J. (PI) ; Barry, J. (PI) ; Beaudreau, S. (PI) ; Benham, A. (PI) ; Berk, M. (PI) ; Bernert, R. (PI) ; Birnbaum, J. (PI) ; Bohon, C. (PI) ; Brown, M. (PI) ; Bullock, K. (PI) ; Carrion, V. (PI) ; Cassidy, E. (PI) ; Chang, K. (PI) ; Chen, L. (PI) ; Cloitre, M. (PI) ; Conner, L. (PI) ; Corcoran, K. (PI) ; De Golia, S. (PI) ; DeBattista, C. (PI) ; Deisseroth, K. (PI) ; Dement, W. (PI) ; Derenne, J. (PI) ; Dhabhar, F. (PI) ; Duncan, L. (PI) ; Dunn, L. (PI) ; Durazzo, T. (PI) ; Etkin, A. (PI) ; Feinstein, C. (PI) ; Fenn, H. (PI) ; Furst, A. (PI) ; Gandy, S. (PI) ; Garner, C. (PI) ; Gengoux, G. (PI) ; Gershon, A. (PI) ; Gore-Felton, C. (PI) ; Greaves, C. (PI) ; Haberecht, M. (PI) ; Hall, S. (PI) ; Hallmayer, J. (PI) ; Hardan, A. (PI) ; Hayward, C. (PI) ; Hill, K. (PI) ; Hoblyn, J. (PI) ; Hong, D. (PI) ; Hsu, J. (PI) ; Hu, R. (PI) ; Humphreys, K. (PI) ; Jo, B. (PI) ; Joshi, S. (PI) ; Kesler, S. (PI) ; Ketter, T. (PI) ; King, R. (PI) ; Kishore, A. (PI) ; Kogon, M. (PI) ; Koopman, C. (PI) ; Kushida, C. (PI) ; Laurent, C. (PI) ; Lazzeroni, L. (PI) ; Lee, T. (PI) ; Lembke, A. (PI) ; Levinson, D. (PI) ; Lindley, S. (PI) ; Linenberg, B. (PI) ; Lock, J. (PI) ; Lotspeich, L. (PI) ; Louie, A. (PI) ; Luce, K. (PI) ; Lyons, D. (PI) ; Maldonado, J. (PI) ; Malenka, R. (PI) ; Manber, R. (PI) ; Marnell, M. (PI) ; Mason, D. (PI) ; McGLYNN, L. (PI) ; Mccaslin, S. (PI) ; Menon, V. (PI) ; Mignot, E. (PI) ; Mourrain, P. (PI) ; Murphy, G. (PI) ; Nathan, K. (PI) ; Nishino, S. (PI) ; Noordsy, D. (PI) ; O'hara, R. (PI) ; Ohayon, M. (PI) ; Ostacher, M. (PI) ; Palesh, O. (PI) ; Parker, K. (PI) ; Pasca, S. (PI) ; Pelayo, R. (PI) ; Phillips, J. (PI) ; Post, L. (PI) ; Rait, D. (PI) ; Rasgon, N. (PI) ; Reicherter, D. (PI) ; Reiss, A. (PI) ; Ringold, A. (PI) ; Roberts, L. (PI) ; Robinson, A. (PI) ; Rodriguez, C. (PI) ; Rosen, A. (PI) ; Rosen, C. (PI) ; Ruzek, J. (PI) ; Safer, D. (PI) ; Salehi, A. (PI) ; Sanders, M. (PI) ; Schatzberg, A. (PI) ; Shaw, R. (PI) ; Singh, M. (PI) ; Solvason, H. (PI) ; Sommer, B. (PI) ; Spiegel, D. (PI) ; Steiner, H. (PI) ; Sullivan, E. (PI) ; Suppes, T. (PI) ; Taylor, C. (PI) ; Taylor, J. (PI) ; Thienemann, M. (PI) ; Thompson, D. (PI) ; Tiet, Q. (PI) ; Tinklenberg, J. (PI) ; Trafton, J. (PI) ; Urban, A. (PI) ; Van Natta, J. (PI) ; Vasan, N. (PI) ; Wang, P. (PI) ; Warner, D. (PI) ; Weitlauf, J. (PI) ; Williams, K. (PI) ; Williams, L. (PI) ; Williams, S. (PI) ; Woodward, S. (PI) ; Wroolie, T. (PI) ; Yesavage, J. (PI) ; Yoon, J. (PI) ; Zappert, L. (PI) ; Zeitzer, J. (PI) ; Zelenko, M. (PI) ; de Lecea, L. (PI) ; Eagleman, D. (SI)

PSYC 299: Directed Reading in Psychiatry

Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-18 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Aboujaoude, E. (PI) ; Adamson, M. (PI) ; Adelsheim, S. (PI) ; Agras, W. (PI) ; Albucher, R. (PI) ; Apple, R. (PI) ; Arnow, B. (PI) ; Ashford, J. (PI) ; Awaad, R. (PI) ; Bale, R. (PI) ; Bandstra, B. (PI) ; Barry, J. (PI) ; Beaudreau, S. (PI) ; Benham, A. (PI) ; Berk, M. (PI) ; Bernert, R. (PI) ; Birnbaum, J. (PI) ; Bohon, C. (PI) ; Brown, M. (PI) ; Bullock, K. (PI) ; Carrion, V. (PI) ; Cassidy, E. (PI) ; Chang, K. (PI) ; Chen, L. (PI) ; Cloitre, M. (PI) ; Conner, L. (PI) ; Corcoran, K. (PI) ; De Golia, S. (PI) ; DeBattista, C. (PI) ; Deisseroth, K. (PI) ; Dement, W. (PI) ; Derenne, J. (PI) ; Dhabhar, F. (PI) ; Duncan, L. (PI) ; Dunn, L. (PI) ; Durazzo, T. (PI) ; Etkin, A. (PI) ; Feinstein, C. (PI) ; Fenn, H. (PI) ; Fung, L. (PI) ; Furst, A. (PI) ; Gandy, S. (PI) ; Garner, C. (PI) ; Gaur, S. (PI) ; Gengoux, G. (PI) ; Gershon, A. (PI) ; Gore-Felton, C. (PI) ; Greaves, C. (PI) ; Haberecht, M. (PI) ; Hall, S. (PI) ; Hallmayer, J. (PI) ; Hardan, A. (PI) ; Hayward, C. (PI) ; Hill, K. (PI) ; Hoblyn, J. (PI) ; Hong, D. (PI) ; Hsu, J. (PI) ; Hu, R. (PI) ; Humphreys, K. (PI) ; Jo, B. (PI) ; Joshi, S. (PI) ; Kesler, S. (PI) ; Ketter, T. (PI) ; King, R. (PI) ; Kishore, A. (PI) ; Kletter, H. (PI) ; Kogon, M. (PI) ; Koopman, C. (PI) ; Kushida, C. (PI) ; Laurent, C. (PI) ; Lazzeroni, L. (PI) ; Lee, T. (PI) ; Lembke, A. (PI) ; Levinson, D. (PI) ; Lindley, S. (PI) ; Linenberg, B. (PI) ; Lock, J. (PI) ; Lotspeich, L. (PI) ; Louie, A. (PI) ; Luce, K. (PI) ; Lyons, D. (PI) ; Maldonado, J. (PI) ; Malenka, R. (PI) ; Manber, R. (PI) ; Marnell, M. (PI) ; McGLYNN, L. (PI) ; Mccaslin, S. (PI) ; Menon, V. (PI) ; Mignot, E. (PI) ; Mourrain, P. (PI) ; Murphy, G. (PI) ; Nathan, K. (PI) ; Nishino, S. (PI) ; Noordsy, D. (PI) ; O'hara, R. (PI) ; Ohayon, M. (PI) ; Ostacher, M. (PI) ; Owusu, Y. (PI) ; Palesh, O. (PI) ; Parker, K. (PI) ; Pasca, S. (PI) ; Pelayo, R. (PI) ; Phillips, J. (PI) ; Post, L. (PI) ; Rait, D. (PI) ; Rasgon, N. (PI) ; Reicherter, D. (PI) ; Reiss, A. (PI) ; Ringold, A. (PI) ; Roberts, L. (PI) ; Robinson, A. (PI) ; Rodriguez, C. (PI) ; Rosen, A. (PI) ; Rosen, C. (PI) ; Ruzek, J. (PI) ; Safer, D. (PI) ; Salehi, A. (PI) ; Sanders, M. (PI) ; Schatzberg, A. (PI) ; Shaw, R. (PI) ; Sher, Y. (PI) ; Simpson, N. (PI) ; Singh, M. (PI) ; Solvason, H. (PI) ; Sommer, B. (PI) ; Spiegel, D. (PI) ; Steiner, H. (PI) ; Sullivan, E. (PI) ; Suppes, T. (PI) ; Taylor, C. (PI) ; Taylor, J. (PI) ; Thienemann, M. (PI) ; Thompson, D. (PI) ; Tiet, Q. (PI) ; Tinklenberg, J. (PI) ; Trafton, J. (PI) ; Tversky, D. (PI) ; Urban, A. (PI) ; Van Natta, J. (PI) ; Wang, P. (PI) ; Warner, D. (PI) ; Weitlauf, J. (PI) ; Williams, K. (PI) ; Williams, L. (PI) ; Williams, S. (PI) ; Woodward, S. (PI) ; Wroolie, T. (PI) ; Yesavage, J. (PI) ; Yoon, J. (PI) ; Zappert, L. (PI) ; Zeitzer, J. (PI) ; Zelenko, M. (PI) ; de Lecea, L. (PI) ; Carrion, V. (SI)

PSYC 300A: Psychiatry Core Clerkship

VISITING: Closed to visitors. TYPE OF CLERKSHIP: Required. DESCRIPTION: The clerkship is designed to solidify the knowledge of psychiatry students have acquired in the Practice of Medicine courses, as students gain practical skills in the application of this knowledge to clinical situations. The focus is on interviewing skills, psychiatric evaluations, on refining diagnostic skills, and offers an overview of psychosocial and biological treatment modalities for the major psychiatric disorders. The clerkship consists of clinical work on inpatient units under the supervision of academic and clinical faculty, a weekly lecture series by academic faculty, interviewing seminars taught by voluntary clinical faculty, and attendance at Grand Rounds. Students are assigned to patient care settings at one of the six affiliated sites: a comprehensive medical psychiatry unit (G2), an inpatient general psychiatry ward (H2), a geriatric psychiatry unit, the consult-liaison service at Stanford Hospital, an inpatient research psychiatric ward specializing in the study of schizophrenia or an acute locked psychiatric ward at the PAVA. In addition, students participate in the specialty outpatient clinics at Stanford including OCD, Child, bipolar, geriatric and general psychopharmacology clinics. Students are given the opportunity to express their preferences regarding assignment. The final rotation assignment is determined by the department based on availability of sites. Students are informed about the specific clerkship requirements at the orientation offered at the start of each clerkship period. They receive a course syllabus, several study guide books and a psychopharmacology textbook. Students are encouraged to visit the Psychiatry clerkship site on Coursework which contains all information, the syllabus and teaching materials. Students are expected to complete five cases on the CaseTool site and to record cases seen by diagnostic category. Requirements include mandatory attendance at seminars, weekly inpatient case history presentations and Emergency room experiences with residents/attending psychiatrists. The NBME Subject Exam in Psychiatry is a required component of the clerkship. PREREQUISITES: None. PERIODS AVAILABLE: 1-16 full-time for three weeks, 10 students per period (minimum of 3 students per period). CLERKSHIP DIRECTOR: Charles DeBattista, M.D., 650-723-8324. CLERKSHIP COORDINATOR: Quynh Dang, 650-725-2769, 401 Quarry Rd, Rm. 2204. REPORTING INSTRUCTIONS: Where: 401 Quarry Rd., 2nd Floor, Room 2213; Time: 8:00 am. CALL CODE: 2, call once per week for the 3 weeks or 3 nights total during 3 week clerkship period. OTHER FACULTY: Staff. LOCATION: SUMC, PAVAMC.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5

PSYC 308E: Trauma Psychiatry

VISITING: Open to visitors. TYPE OF CLERKSHIP: Elective. DESCRIPTION: The Trauma Psychiatry clerkship teaches how trauma impacts the lives and health of patients; lessons learned are generalizable to all areas of medicine (i.e., "trauma-informed medicine"). Students work with people suffering from PTSD relating to sexual assault, combat or other traumas who are receiving ambulatory-type treatments in an intensive, multidisciplinary setting. Students will have direct patient responsibility, provide evidence-based psychopharmacologic and psychotherapeutic care and longitudinal management, and facilitate recovery. Students will gain perspective on trauma in our world and the importance of sensitive and effective treatment for this all too common condition (7.8% lifetime prevalence). PREREQUISITES: Visiting students must obtain approval from Ms. Quynh Dang prior to applying for this clerkship. Please email requests to qdang@stanford.edu. None for internal students. PERIODS AVAILABLE: 1-16, more »
VISITING: Open to visitors. TYPE OF CLERKSHIP: Elective. DESCRIPTION: The Trauma Psychiatry clerkship teaches how trauma impacts the lives and health of patients; lessons learned are generalizable to all areas of medicine (i.e., "trauma-informed medicine"). Students work with people suffering from PTSD relating to sexual assault, combat or other traumas who are receiving ambulatory-type treatments in an intensive, multidisciplinary setting. Students will have direct patient responsibility, provide evidence-based psychopharmacologic and psychotherapeutic care and longitudinal management, and facilitate recovery. Students will gain perspective on trauma in our world and the importance of sensitive and effective treatment for this all too common condition (7.8% lifetime prevalence). PREREQUISITES: Visiting students must obtain approval from Ms. Quynh Dang prior to applying for this clerkship. Please email requests to qdang@stanford.edu. None for internal students. PERIODS AVAILABLE: 1-16, full-time for three weeks, 1 student per period. CLERKSHIP DIRECTOR: James Armountrout, M.D. CLERKSHIP COORDINATOR: Quynh Dang, 650-725-2769, 401 Quarry Rd, Rm. 2204. REPORTING INSTRUCTIONS: Where: Trauma Recovery Program, Menlo Park VA, Building 351; Time: 8:30 a.m. CALL CODE: 0. OTHER FACULTY: A. Franciscus. LOCATION: VA Menlo Park.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5
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