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31 - 40 of 67 results for: PSYC

PSYC 213: Policy Practicum: Alcohol Use Among Stanford Undergraduates

(Same as LAW 806L) Client: Stanford University Vice Provost of Student Affairs, https://studentaffairs.stanford.edu/who-we-are/vice-provost-student-affairs. Excessive alcohol consumption among Stanford undergraduates creates ahealth, educational, social, and legal problems for drinkers and for other members of the Stanford community. With the Vice Provost for Student Affairs as the client, this Policy Lab practicum explores the causes, consequences, and practical evidence to assess and address the problem. The interdisciplinary research team will examine practices and data at Stanford and other academic institutions in the context of scholarly studies and general knowledge from medicine, law, psychology, and other social sciences. As one component of formal policy research methods, the team will conduct ethnographic interviews with stakeholders. Upper-division and graduate students from Law, Medicine, Public Policy, and social science disciplines are especially encouraged to apply. L more »
(Same as LAW 806L) Client: Stanford University Vice Provost of Student Affairs, https://studentaffairs.stanford.edu/who-we-are/vice-provost-student-affairs. Excessive alcohol consumption among Stanford undergraduates creates ahealth, educational, social, and legal problems for drinkers and for other members of the Stanford community. With the Vice Provost for Student Affairs as the client, this Policy Lab practicum explores the causes, consequences, and practical evidence to assess and address the problem. The interdisciplinary research team will examine practices and data at Stanford and other academic institutions in the context of scholarly studies and general knowledge from medicine, law, psychology, and other social sciences. As one component of formal policy research methods, the team will conduct ethnographic interviews with stakeholders. Upper-division and graduate students from Law, Medicine, Public Policy, and social science disciplines are especially encouraged to apply. Law students wishing to undertake R credit will perform additional research for a full report analyzing the issues and results of the collective research. R credit is possible only by consent of the instructor. After the term begins, and with the consent of the instructor, students accepted into the course may transfer from section (01) into section (02), which meets the R requirement. NOTE: Students may not count more than a combined total of eight units of directed research projects and policy lab practica toward graduation unless the additional counted units are approved in advance by the Petitions Committee. Such approval will be granted only for good cause shown. Even in the case of a successful petition for additional units, a student cannot receive a letter grade for more than eight units of independent research (Policy Lab practicum, Directed Research, Senior Thesis, and/or Research Track). Any units taken in excess of eight will be graded on a mandatory pass basis. For detailed information, see "Directed Research/Policy Labs" in the SLS Student Handbook. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Performance, Class Participation, Written Assignments, Final Paper.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2

PSYC 223B: Topics in Neurodiversity: Design Thinking Approaches

The course provides essential background about neurodiversity, the design thinking process and the Universal Design for Learning (UDL) framework to guide students in developing projects that maximize the potential of neurodiversity. Through case studies, field trips, guest speakers, and community engagement, students will explore approaches to maximizing inclusivity in realms such as education, employment, community and beyond. Students will use their knowledge to design and develop (or revising and enhance) processes, systems, experiences and/or products to maximize inclusivity and the potential of neurodiverse individuals. Based on student's interests and areas of focus, projects may include digital tool development such as app concept and design, redesign of standard processes such as job interviews/ candidate evaluations, design and development of physical products or spaces such as sensory-sensitive dorm rooms, "stim tools" and more. All students taking this course will meet on Mondays; students taking this course for 4 units will also attend class on Wednesdays for "lab hours" which will support with project development. This course is open to undergraduate and graduate students in all schools.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 2-4
Instructors: Fung, L. (PI)

PSYC 225: Stanford Klingenstein Fellowship Program

A mentoring program designed to expose first and second year medical students to the rewarding field of child and adolescent psychiatry, and to increase awareness and education about child and adolescent mental health issues. Offers a year-long program wherein medical students are paired with child and adolescent psychiatrists, meeting bimonthly for clinical experiences and mentoring. Also provides opportunities for the students to get involved in cutting-edge scientific research, networking opportunities, and opportunities to attend professional conferences.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit

PSYC 226: Asian-American Culture and Medicine

In this lunch talk series, students will explore the interaction of Asian-American culture and the practice of medicine, through personal and professional perspectives and narractives of physicians and others in healthcare. Topics will vary form year to year, including Asian-American influences on providers, medical trainees, patients, populations, the doctor-patient relationship, and diseases. A particular emphasis will be placed on mental health and the psychology of Asian-American culture. Of note, this course may touch on sensitive topics in mental health including suicide, psychosis, addiction, child abuse, sexual assault, violence, and mental disorders. Priority will be given to MD students. Students not in the MD program must obtain approval of the instructor to enroll.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Louie, A. (PI)

PSYC 229A: Topics in Neurodiversity: Introduction and Advocacy

This is part 1 of a year-long course which provides students with the foundation, knowledge, and essential skills for understanding, engaging with, and advocating for the neurodiverse population. In addition, this course will also provide direct instruction to students in the areas of activities of daily living (ADLs), social communication strategies, navigating social relationships, self-regulation, support in accommodations, and support in career development.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit

PSYC 229B: Topics in Neurodiversity: Introduction and Advocacy

This is part 1 of a year-long course which provides students with the foundation, knowledge, and essential skills for understanding, engaging with, and advocating for the neurodiverse population. In addition, this course will also provide direct instruction to students in the areas of activities of daily living (ADLs), social communication strategies, navigating social relationships, self-regulation, support in accommodations, and support in career development.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit

PSYC 229C: Topics in Neurodiversity: Introduction and Advocacy

This is part 1 of a year-long course which provides students with the foundation, knowledge, and essential skills for understanding, engaging with, and advocating for the neurodiverse population. In addition, this course will also provide direct instruction to students in the areas of activities of daily living (ADLs), social communication strategies, navigating social relationships, self-regulation, support in accommodations, and support in career development.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit

PSYC 233: Mindfulness: An Awareness-Based Stress Reduction Program in Medicine

An experiential program in which the participants learn the techniques of mindfulness meditation and its application in the management of stress and in healthcare. Modeled after the MBSR, Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction, started by Jon Kabat-Zinn at UMASS Medical Center. Designed to work with the mind/body relationship to stress and chronic illness teaching open sensitive awareness without judgement of mental or physical reactivity. Requirement for the course is the daily practice of mindfulness meditation, attendance at weekly class meetings and the all day retreat, home reading, and a final paper covering the student's observations.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 3

PSYC 235: Sleep and Dreams (PSYC 135)

Dr. William Dement created Sleep and Dreams in 1971, the world¿s first university undergraduate-level course on the science of sleep. Now as an emeritus professor, he continues to be actively involved in the course teaching many of the lectures and sometimes driving students to class in his golf cart! The course is designed to impart essential knowledge of the neuroscience of sleep and covers how sleep affects our daily lives. The course covers normal sleep and dreams, as well as common sleep disorders. Course content empowers students to make educated decisions concerning sleep and alertness for the rest of their lives and shapes students' attitudes about the importance of sleep. Students will keep track of their sleep patterns during the course. They will also participate in an outreach project to help improve awareness of the importance of sleep heath in our community. Undergraduates must enroll in PSYC 135, while graduate students should enroll in PSYC 235.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 3

PSYC 236A: Valuescience: Shedding Illusion to Live and Die Well (PSYC 136A)

Apply scientific methods and principles to discern and realize value. Read history, philosophy, ecology, economics, sociology, linguistics and psychology pertinent to emergence of valuescience as foundation for an increasing range of human action. Explore perceptual, cognitive, and cultural impediments to valuescience; strategies for overcoming these; and personal and social benefits of doing so. 4 units includes weekly practice (e.g., meditation, aerobic exercise). Students may enroll in PSYC 136A or PSYC 136B or both. Either may be taken first.
Last offered: Autumn 2018
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