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11 - 20 of 28 results for: PSYC ; Currently searching autumn courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

PSYC 243: Thriving in Collegiate Athletics: Key Concepts in Student-Athlete Health and Wellness

Develops the understanding, self-awareness, confidence, and skills necessary for students to serve as a resource for their athlete peers in the areas of building resilience, promoting well-being, and supporting emotional balance. Examines personal values, athlete identity, signature strengths, self-care and stress management practices, signs and symptoms of common mental health concerns, and barriers for care-seeking in student-athlete population. Develops skills for enhancing personal well-being communication with coaches and teammates, connecting peers with existing resources, and promoting a culture of support, health, and wellness.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2

PSYC 249: Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences Subspecialty Areas

In this lunch talk series, students will explore psychiatry and behavioral science subspecialty areas through the personal perspectives of psychiatrists and other specialists in behavioral health from a variety of practice settings. Some examples of topics have been advances in subspecialty areas (e.g., child and adolescent psychiatry, psychotherapy, legal issues, mood & anxiety disorders, community outreach, eating disorders), the interplay between social issues and mental healthcare, and the nature of psychiatric work and work/life balance. Of note, this course discusses sensitive topics in psychiatry including suicide, psychosis, addiction, child abuse, sexual assault, trauma, violence, and mental disorders. While priority will be given to MD students, undergraduates and graduate students are welcomed. Address questions to Prof. Alan Louie, Louiemd@stanford.edu
Terms: Aut | Units: 0-1 | Repeatable for credit

PSYC 250: Methodology of Research in Behavioral Sciences

Statistical and methodological issues in three major psychiatric research themes: clinical psychiatric research (Aut), neuroimaging research (Win), and statistical genetics and general statistical modeling (Spr). Autumn series includes: basics of inferential statistics, group comparison, analysis of variance, regression analysis, multivariate analysis, and longitudinal analysis in the context of psychiatric and behavioral research. Also included are conceptual topics such as risk factors, mediation, moderation, and causal inference. Winter series includes: functional and structural neuroimaging research methods (e.g. functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), structural MRI (sMRI), diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), electroencephalogram (EEG)). Basic principles, statistical analysis methods, advantages and limitations, and applications are discussed. Spring series includes: tests and effect estimation for multi more »
Statistical and methodological issues in three major psychiatric research themes: clinical psychiatric research (Aut), neuroimaging research (Win), and statistical genetics and general statistical modeling (Spr). Autumn series includes: basics of inferential statistics, group comparison, analysis of variance, regression analysis, multivariate analysis, and longitudinal analysis in the context of psychiatric and behavioral research. Also included are conceptual topics such as risk factors, mediation, moderation, and causal inference. Winter series includes: functional and structural neuroimaging research methods (e.g. functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), structural MRI (sMRI), diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), electroencephalogram (EEG)). Basic principles, statistical analysis methods, advantages and limitations, and applications are discussed. Spring series includes: tests and effect estimation for multiple SNPs, genes or pathways in genetic association studies, gene-gene interactions, twins and heritability estimates, Hardy-Weinberg and linkage equilibrium, interpretation and presentation of results for a range of statistical models for different types of data. Practical examples from recent research within the Department of Psychiatry will be used throughout the course. Prerequisite: Some exposure to statistical methods, either from course work or from participation in research having some behavioral aspects, or consent of instructor. 1 unit for class participation only, 2 units includes weekly assignments, 3 units includes a final project.
Terms: Aut, Win, Sum | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit

PSYC 290: Teaching in Psychiatry

Practical experience in teaching by serving as a teaching assistant in a psychiatry course. Unit values are allotted individually to reflect the level of teaching responsibility assigned to the student.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Aboujaoude, E. (PI) ; Adamson, M. (PI) ; Adelsheim, S. (PI) ; Agras, W. (PI) ; Albucher, R. (PI) ; Apple, R. (PI) ; Arnow, B. (PI) ; Ashford, J. (PI) ; Barry, J. (PI) ; Beaudreau, S. (PI) ; Benham, A. (PI) ; Berk, M. (PI) ; Bernert, R. (PI) ; Birnbaum, J. (PI) ; Bohon, C. (PI) ; Brown, M. (PI) ; Bullock, K. (PI) ; Carrion, V. (PI) ; Cassidy, E. (PI) ; Chang, K. (PI) ; Chen, L. (PI) ; Cloitre, M. (PI) ; Conner, L. (PI) ; Corcoran, K. (PI) ; De Golia, S. (PI) ; DeBattista, C. (PI) ; Deisseroth, K. (PI) ; Dement, W. (PI) ; Derenne, J. (PI) ; Dhabhar, F. (PI) ; Duncan, L. (PI) ; Dunn, L. (PI) ; Durazzo, T. (PI) ; Etkin, A. (PI) ; Feinstein, C. (PI) ; Fenn, H. (PI) ; Furst, A. (PI) ; Gandy, S. (PI) ; Garner, C. (PI) ; Gengoux, G. (PI) ; Gershon, A. (PI) ; Gore-Felton, C. (PI) ; Greaves, C. (PI) ; Guilleminault, C. (PI) ; Haberecht, M. (PI) ; Hall, S. (PI) ; Hallmayer, J. (PI) ; Hardan, A. (PI) ; Hayward, C. (PI) ; Hill, K. (PI) ; Hoblyn, J. (PI) ; Hong, D. (PI) ; Hsu, J. (PI) ; Hu, R. (PI) ; Humphreys, K. (PI) ; Jo, B. (PI) ; Joshi, S. (PI) ; Kesler, S. (PI) ; Ketter, T. (PI) ; King, R. (PI) ; Kishore, A. (PI) ; Kogon, M. (PI) ; Koopman, C. (PI) ; Kushida, C. (PI) ; Laurent, C. (PI) ; Lazzeroni, L. (PI) ; Lee, T. (PI) ; Lembke, A. (PI) ; Levinson, D. (PI) ; Lindley, S. (PI) ; Linenberg, B. (PI) ; Lock, J. (PI) ; Lotspeich, L. (PI) ; Louie, A. (PI) ; Luce, K. (PI) ; Lyons, D. (PI) ; Maldonado, J. (PI) ; Malenka, R. (PI) ; Manber, R. (PI) ; Marnell, M. (PI) ; Mason, D. (PI) ; McGLYNN, L. (PI) ; Mccaslin, S. (PI) ; Menon, V. (PI) ; Mignot, E. (PI) ; Mourrain, P. (PI) ; Murphy, G. (PI) ; Nathan, K. (PI) ; Nishino, S. (PI) ; Noordsy, D. (PI) ; O'hara, R. (PI) ; Ohayon, M. (PI) ; Ostacher, M. (PI) ; Palesh, O. (PI) ; Parker, K. (PI) ; Pasca, S. (PI) ; Pelayo, R. (PI) ; Phillips, J. (PI) ; Post, L. (PI) ; Rait, D. (PI) ; Rasgon, N. (PI) ; Reicherter, D. (PI) ; Reiss, A. (PI) ; Ringold, A. (PI) ; Roberts, L. (PI) ; Robinson, A. (PI) ; Rodriguez, C. (PI) ; Rosen, A. (PI) ; Rosen, C. (PI) ; Ruzek, J. (PI) ; Safer, D. (PI) ; Salehi, A. (PI) ; Sanders, M. (PI) ; Schatzberg, A. (PI) ; Shaw, R. (PI) ; Singh, M. (PI) ; Solvason, H. (PI) ; Sommer, B. (PI) ; Spiegel, D. (PI) ; Steiner, H. (PI) ; Sullivan, E. (PI) ; Suppes, T. (PI) ; Taylor, C. (PI) ; Taylor, J. (PI) ; Thienemann, M. (PI) ; Thompson, D. (PI) ; Tiet, Q. (PI) ; Tinklenberg, J. (PI) ; Trafton, J. (PI) ; Urban, A. (PI) ; Van Natta, J. (PI) ; Wang, P. (PI) ; Warner, D. (PI) ; Weitlauf, J. (PI) ; Williams, K. (PI) ; Williams, L. (PI) ; Williams, S. (PI) ; Woodward, S. (PI) ; Wroolie, T. (PI) ; Yesavage, J. (PI) ; Yoon, J. (PI) ; Zappert, L. (PI) ; Zeitzer, J. (PI) ; Zelenko, M. (PI) ; de Lecea, L. (PI) ; Eagleman, D. (SI)

PSYC 299: Directed Reading in Psychiatry

Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-18 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Aboujaoude, E. (PI) ; Adamson, M. (PI) ; Adelsheim, S. (PI) ; Agras, W. (PI) ; Albucher, R. (PI) ; Apple, R. (PI) ; Arnow, B. (PI) ; Ashford, J. (PI) ; Bale, R. (PI) ; Bandstra, B. (PI) ; Barry, J. (PI) ; Beaudreau, S. (PI) ; Benham, A. (PI) ; Berk, M. (PI) ; Bernert, R. (PI) ; Birnbaum, J. (PI) ; Bohon, C. (PI) ; Brown, M. (PI) ; Bullock, K. (PI) ; Carrion, V. (PI) ; Cassidy, E. (PI) ; Chang, K. (PI) ; Chen, L. (PI) ; Cloitre, M. (PI) ; Conner, L. (PI) ; Corcoran, K. (PI) ; De Golia, S. (PI) ; DeBattista, C. (PI) ; Deisseroth, K. (PI) ; Dement, W. (PI) ; Derenne, J. (PI) ; Dhabhar, F. (PI) ; Duncan, L. (PI) ; Dunn, L. (PI) ; Durazzo, T. (PI) ; Etkin, A. (PI) ; Feinstein, C. (PI) ; Fenn, H. (PI) ; Furst, A. (PI) ; Gandy, S. (PI) ; Garner, C. (PI) ; Gengoux, G. (PI) ; Gershon, A. (PI) ; Gore-Felton, C. (PI) ; Greaves, C. (PI) ; Guilleminault, C. (PI) ; Haberecht, M. (PI) ; Hall, S. (PI) ; Hallmayer, J. (PI) ; Hardan, A. (PI) ; Hayward, C. (PI) ; Hill, K. (PI) ; Hoblyn, J. (PI) ; Hong, D. (PI) ; Hsu, J. (PI) ; Hu, R. (PI) ; Humphreys, K. (PI) ; Jo, B. (PI) ; Joshi, S. (PI) ; Kesler, S. (PI) ; Ketter, T. (PI) ; King, R. (PI) ; Kishore, A. (PI) ; Kletter, H. (PI) ; Kogon, M. (PI) ; Koopman, C. (PI) ; Kushida, C. (PI) ; Laurent, C. (PI) ; Lazzeroni, L. (PI) ; Lee, T. (PI) ; Lembke, A. (PI) ; Levinson, D. (PI) ; Lindley, S. (PI) ; Linenberg, B. (PI) ; Lock, J. (PI) ; Lotspeich, L. (PI) ; Louie, A. (PI) ; Luce, K. (PI) ; Lyons, D. (PI) ; Maldonado, J. (PI) ; Malenka, R. (PI) ; Manber, R. (PI) ; Marnell, M. (PI) ; McGLYNN, L. (PI) ; Mccaslin, S. (PI) ; Menon, V. (PI) ; Mignot, E. (PI) ; Mourrain, P. (PI) ; Murphy, G. (PI) ; Nathan, K. (PI) ; Nishino, S. (PI) ; Noordsy, D. (PI) ; O'hara, R. (PI) ; Ohayon, M. (PI) ; Ostacher, M. (PI) ; Palesh, O. (PI) ; Parker, K. (PI) ; Pasca, S. (PI) ; Pelayo, R. (PI) ; Phillips, J. (PI) ; Post, L. (PI) ; Rait, D. (PI) ; Rasgon, N. (PI) ; Reicherter, D. (PI) ; Reiss, A. (PI) ; Ringold, A. (PI) ; Roberts, L. (PI) ; Robinson, A. (PI) ; Rodriguez, C. (PI) ; Rosen, A. (PI) ; Rosen, C. (PI) ; Ruzek, J. (PI) ; Safer, D. (PI) ; Salehi, A. (PI) ; Sanders, M. (PI) ; Schatzberg, A. (PI) ; Shaw, R. (PI) ; Singh, M. (PI) ; Solvason, H. (PI) ; Sommer, B. (PI) ; Spiegel, D. (PI) ; Steiner, H. (PI) ; Sullivan, E. (PI) ; Suppes, T. (PI) ; Taylor, C. (PI) ; Taylor, J. (PI) ; Thienemann, M. (PI) ; Thompson, D. (PI) ; Tiet, Q. (PI) ; Tinklenberg, J. (PI) ; Trafton, J. (PI) ; Urban, A. (PI) ; Van Natta, J. (PI) ; Wang, P. (PI) ; Warner, D. (PI) ; Weitlauf, J. (PI) ; Williams, K. (PI) ; Williams, L. (PI) ; Williams, S. (PI) ; Woodward, S. (PI) ; Wroolie, T. (PI) ; Yesavage, J. (PI) ; Yoon, J. (PI) ; Zappert, L. (PI) ; Zeitzer, J. (PI) ; Zelenko, M. (PI) ; de Lecea, L. (PI) ; Carrion, V. (SI)

PSYC 300A: Psychiatry Core Clerkship

Required Clerkship. Closed to visitors. The clerkship is designed to solidify the knowledge of psychiatry students have acquired in the Practice of Medicine courses, as students gain practical skills in the application of this knowledge to clinical situations. The focus is on interviewing skills, psychiatric evaluations, on refining diagnostic skills, and offers an overview of psychosocial and biological treatment modalities for the major psychiatric disorders. The clerkship consists of clinical work on inpatient units under the supervision of academic and clinical faculty, a weekly lecture series by academic faculty, interviewing seminars taught by voluntary clinical faculty, and attendance at Grand Rounds. Students are assigned to patient care settings at one of the six affiliated sites: a comprehensive medical psychiatry unit (G2), an inpatient general psychiatry ward (H2), a geriatric psychiatry unit, the consult-liaison service at Stanford Hospital, an inpatient research psychiatric ward specializing in the study of schizophrenia or an acute locked psychiatric ward at the PAVA. In addition, students participate in the specialty outpatient clinics at Stanford including OCD, Child, bipolar, geriatric and general psychopharmacology clinics. Students are given the opportunity to express their preferences regarding assignment. The final rotation assignment is determined by the department based on availability of sites. Students are informed about the specific clerkship requirements at the orientation offered at the start of each clerkship period. They receive a course syllabus, several study guide books and a psychopharmacology textbook. Students are encouraged to visit the Psychiatry clerkship site on Coursework which contains all information, the syllabus and teaching materials. Students are expected to complete five cases on the CaseTool site and to record cases seen by diagnostic category. Requirements include mandatory attendance at seminars, weekly inpatient case history presentations and Emergency room experiences with residents/attending psychiatrists. The NBME Subject Exam in Psychiatry is a required component of the clerkship. Prereq: INDE 205. Periods Avail: 1-12, full-time for four weeks. 10 students per period (minimum of 3 students per period). Reporting Instructions: Where: 401 Quarry Rd., 2nd Floor, Room 2213; Time: 8:00 am. Units: 6 Call Code: 2, call once per week for the first 3 weeks or 3 nights total during 4 week clerkship period. Director: Charles DeBattista, M.D. (650-723-8324). Coord: Quynh Dang (650-725-2769), 401 Quarry Rd, Rm. 2204.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 6

PSYC 308E: Trauma Psychiatry

Open to visitors. The Trauma Psychiatry clerkship teaches how trauma impacts the lives and health of patients; lessons learned are generalizable to all areas of medicine (i.e., "trauma-informed medicine¿). Students work with people suffering from PTSD relating to sexual assault, combat or other traumas who are receiving ambulatory-type treatments in an intensive, multidisciplinary setting. Students will have direct patient responsibility, provide evidence-based psychopharmacologic and psychotherapeutic care and longitudinal management, and facilitate recovery. Students will gain perspective on trauma in our world and the importance of sensitive and effective treatment for this all too common condition (7.8% lifetime prevalence). Please note: Visiting students must obtain approval from Ms. Quynh Dang prior to applying for this clerkship. Please email requests to qdang@stanford.edu. Periods Avail: 1-12, full-time for four weeks. 1 student per period. Reporting Instructions: Where: Trauma Recovery Program, Menlo Park VA, Building 351; Time: 8:30 a.m. Units: 6. Call Code: 0. Director: Tasha Souter, M.D. Coord: Quynh Dang (650-725-2769), 401 Quarry Rd, Rm. 2204. (MPVAMC)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 6

PSYC 326A: Child Psychiatry Clerkship

Open to visitors. Exposes the student to advanced principles and concepts of child psychiatry. The student is based primarily on the inpatient pediatric psychiatry consultation-liaison service at Lucile Packard Children's Hospital at Stanford (LPCH). Clinical experience will involve consultation and the treatment of psychological issues in children with medical illness. Examples include depression and anxiety in the medically-ill child, pediatric conversion disorders, somatoform disorders and medically-related posttraumatic stress disorder. Students will develop skills in interviewing children and parents, learn team treatment skills for children with psychosomatic and psychiatric illnesses, observe family therapy, and produce case work-ups of children with a range of behavioral disorders. Students may have the option of spending one day/week in the Stanford child psychiatry outpatient clinic observing new evaluations in subspecialty clinics (anxiety disorders, mood disorders, attentio more »
Open to visitors. Exposes the student to advanced principles and concepts of child psychiatry. The student is based primarily on the inpatient pediatric psychiatry consultation-liaison service at Lucile Packard Children's Hospital at Stanford (LPCH). Clinical experience will involve consultation and the treatment of psychological issues in children with medical illness. Examples include depression and anxiety in the medically-ill child, pediatric conversion disorders, somatoform disorders and medically-related posttraumatic stress disorder. Students will develop skills in interviewing children and parents, learn team treatment skills for children with psychosomatic and psychiatric illnesses, observe family therapy, and produce case work-ups of children with a range of behavioral disorders. Students may have the option of spending one day/week in the Stanford child psychiatry outpatient clinic observing new evaluations in subspecialty clinics (anxiety disorders, mood disorders, attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder, neuropsychiatry/pervasive developmental disorders, pediatric pain). Students may also observe evaluations on the inpatient adolescent eating disorder program. A case presentation is required at the end of the clerkship. Students are supervised by the consult service attending psychiatrist, and the child psychiatry fellows. Prereq: Psychiatry 300A. Periods Avail: 1-12, full-time for four weeks. 2 students per period. Reporting Instructions: Where: Psych Therapy room on Unit 380 at LPCH; Time: 9:00 am. Students should obtain LPCH EPIC access and an LPCH dictation number prior to starting the clerkship. Units: 6. Call Code: 0. Director: Richard Shaw, M.D. Other Faculty: M. Brown, J. Crawford, W. Daniels, M. Goldsmith, L. Schneider, R. Shaw, P. Tran. Coord: Quynh Dang (650-725-2769), 401 Quarry Rd, Rm. 2204. (LPCH)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 6 | Repeatable for credit

PSYC 328B: Addiction Treatment Services

Selective 1. Open to visitors. In this rotation, medical students observe and participate in a 28-day residential addiction treatment program located at the VA Palo Alto. A typical day includes an admission, which is a typical psychiatric work-up with an additional emphasis on substance abuse assessment; group therapy meetings throughout the day utilizing various psychotherapeutic modalities; a multidisciplinary staff meeting focused on individualized care and management approaches; and a community meeting, in which milieu events are processed. The overall goal is to become familiar with general psychiatry and residential treatment while gaining exposure to substance abuse treatment issues. Residential programs combine elements of both inpatient and outpatient settings and are unique in this regard. The attending psychiatrist teaches history-taking, DSM diagnoses, and psychopharmacology for substance use disorders. In addition to the above, students will gain exposure to the other subs more »
Selective 1. Open to visitors. In this rotation, medical students observe and participate in a 28-day residential addiction treatment program located at the VA Palo Alto. A typical day includes an admission, which is a typical psychiatric work-up with an additional emphasis on substance abuse assessment; group therapy meetings throughout the day utilizing various psychotherapeutic modalities; a multidisciplinary staff meeting focused on individualized care and management approaches; and a community meeting, in which milieu events are processed. The overall goal is to become familiar with general psychiatry and residential treatment while gaining exposure to substance abuse treatment issues. Residential programs combine elements of both inpatient and outpatient settings and are unique in this regard. The attending psychiatrist teaches history-taking, DSM diagnoses, and psychopharmacology for substance use disorders. In addition to the above, students will gain exposure to the other substance abuse treatment programs located at the Palo Alto VA, such as the multi-disciplinary assessment/consultation clinic, the intensive outpatient program, outpatient addiction medication management, and office-based opioid replacement therapy. Periods Avail: 1-12, full-time for two weeks or four weeks. 1 student per period. Reporting Instructions: Where: Lobby of Building 520-A, 3801 Miranda Ave, Palo Alto.; Time: 8:00 a.m. Units: 3. Call Code: 0. Director: Marina Urman-Yotam, M.D. Other Faculty: Marina Urman-Yotam, M.D. Coord: Quynh Dang (650-725-2769), 401 Quarry Rd, Rm. 2204. (PAVAMC)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit

PSYC 333A: Sleep Medicine for Medical Students

Closed to visitors, This clerkship offers a comprehensive experience in sleep medicine for those interested in pursuing a future career in sleep medicine. Students shadow sleep specialists in their evaluation of patients with sleep disorders; review polysomnography (sleep studies) of patients with sleep disorders; and attend informal discussions and case conferences regarding interesting sleep problems, formal conferences on sleep research, sleep surgery, and sleep disorders, and journal club reviews of topical articles on sleep and sleep disorders. PLEASE NOTE: Visiting students must obtain approval from Dr. Kushida prior to applying for this clerkship. Please email requests to clete@stanford.edu. Periods Avail: 2-12, full-time for 2 weeks or 4 weeks. 1 student per period. Reporting Instructions: Clete Kushida, M.D., Ph.D. or Christian Guilleminault, M.D., Sleep Medicine Center at the Stanford Medicine Outpatient Center, 450. Broadway Street, Redwood City, Pavilion B, 2nd Floor, Control Room, Time: 8:00 am M-F. Units: 3 or 6. Call Code: 0. Director: Clete Kushida, M.D. & Christian Guilleminault, M.D. Coord: Clete Kushida, M.D. (650-721-7560). (SUMC)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 3-6
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