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1 - 4 of 4 results for: POLISCI234

POLISCI 234: Democratic Theory (ETHICSOC 234, PHIL 176P)

Most people agree that democracy is a good thing, but do we agree on what democracy is? This course will examine the concept of democracy in political philosophy. We will address the following questions: What reason(s), if any, do we have for valuing democracy? What does it mean to treat people as political equals? When does a group of individuals constitute "a people," and how can a people make genuinely collective decisions? Can democracy really be compatible with social inequality? With an entrenched constitution? With representation?
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER
Instructors: Coyne, B. (PI)

POLISCI 234N: The Concept of Society from Marx to Zuckerberg

What is society and what does it mean to be a member of one? This course examines these questions by looking at three different periods within the history of modern political thought in which the concept of society was debated and transformed. In the first section of the course, we will explore the emergence of "civil society" within bourgeois political thought, and the relationship of this concept to notions of property, the state, commerce, and colonial encounter. In the second section of the course, we will turn to twentieth-century debates concerning mass society and issues such asncommunication, identity, democracy, and global governance. In the final section of the course, we will focus on contemporary reconfigurations of the idea of society within technological, digital, and ecological spaces and communities.
Last offered: Summer 2021 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER

POLISCI 234P: Deliberative Democracy and its Critics (AMSTUD 135, COMM 135, COMM 235, COMM 335, ETHICSOC 135F, POLISCI 334P)

This course examines the theory and practice of deliberative democracy and engages both in a dialogue with critics. Can a democracy which emphasizes people thinking and talking together on the basis of good information be made practical in the modern age? What kinds of distortions arise when people try to discuss politics or policy together? The course draws on ideas of deliberation from Madison and Mill to Rawls and Habermas as well as criticisms from the jury literature, from the psychology of group processes and from the most recent normative and empirical literature on deliberative forums. Deliberative Polling, its applications, defenders and critics, both normative and empirical, will provide a key case for discussion.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER, WAY-SI

POLISCI 234S: The Political Theory of Progress Reconsidered

This course will consider the origins and fate of Enlightenment theories of political progress. We will begin with the classic accounts of progress in Kant, Hegel, and Marx, before turning to conservative critics of progress (Burke, de Maistre), and non-conservative challenges to the idea of progress (Weber, Schmitt, Adorno, Arendt), before concluding with contemporary controversies around the idea of progress as it pertains to technology, the environment, and economic inequality.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER
Instructors: Abolafia, J. (PI)
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