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41 - 50 of 52 results for: POLISCI

POLISCI 420A: American Political Institutions

Theories of American politics, focusing on Congress, the presidency, the bureaucracy, and the courts.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

POLISCI 421K: Questionnaire Design for Surveys and Laboratory Experiments: Social and Cognitive Perspectives (COMM 339, PSYCH 231)

The social and psychological processes involved in asking and answering questions via questionnaires for the social sciences; optimizing questionnaire design; open versus closed questions; rating versus ranking; rating scale length and point labeling; acquiescence response bias; don't-know response options; response choice order effects; question order effects; social desirability response bias; attitude and behavior recall; and introspective accounts of the causes of thoughts and actions.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Krosnick, J. (PI)

POLISCI 422P: Creating the American Republic (AMSTUD 251X, HISTORY 251, HISTORY 351, POLISCI 222P)

Concepts and developments in the late 18th-century invention of American constitutionalism; the politics of constitution making and ratifying; emergence of theories of constitutional interpretation including originalism; early notions of judicial review. Primary and secondary sources.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Rakove, J. (PI)

POLISCI 433: Workshop in Political Theory

For graduate students. Faculty, guest speakers, and graduate students conducting research in political theory present works-in-progress. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Coyne, B. (PI)

POLISCI 437C: 20th Century and Contemporary Political Theory

This course provides a survey of some of the major contributions to political thought in the past century. The course will place special emphasis on the development of theories of political authority and legitimacy in the context of the modern bureaucratic state, as well as the connection between authority and other key concepts in normative political authority: democracy, justice, and freedom.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Chapman, E. (PI)

POLISCI 440A: Theories in Comparative Politics

Required of Political Science Ph.D. students with comparative politics as first or second concentration; others by consent of instructor. Theories addressing major concerns in the comparative field including identity, order, regime type, legitimacy, and governance.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

POLISCI 440D: Workshop in Comparative Politics

Faculty, guest speakers, and graduate students conducting research in comparative politics present work-in-progress. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Gulzar, S. (PI)

POLISCI 446A: Paths to the Modern World: Islam and the West (POLISCI 246A)

How and why did Europe develop political institutions that encouraged economic growth and industrialization? And why has the Islamic world lagged in the creation of growth-promoting institutions? This course uses a comparative approach to understanding two routes to the modern world -- the historical experiences of Christian Europe and the Islamic world. We will explore questions including, when do representative parliamentary assemblies emerge and how does urbanization affect economic development?
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

POLISCI 450A: Political Methodology I: Regression

Introduction to statistical research in political science, with a focus on linear regression. Teaches students how to apply multiple regression models as used in much of political science research. Also covers elements of probability and sampling theory.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

POLISCI 460A: Political Economy I (ECON 220)

Introduction to empirical and theoretical research in political economy. This course focuses on issues in democracies, while Political Economy II focuses on issues in non-democracies. Topics may include institutional foundations, social choice, electoral competition and candidate positioning, accountability, voter behavior, polarization, media and political communication, redistribution, special interests and lobbying, collective action, immigration, and populism. Prerequisite for Econ PhD students: ECON 202 and 270 or permission of instructors. Prerequisites for Political Science PhD students: POLISCI 450A, POLISCI 450B, and POLISCI 356A.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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