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21 - 30 of 48 results for: POLISCI

POLISCI 314D: Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law (INTLPOL 230, INTNLREL 114D, POLISCI 114D)

This course explores the different dimensions of development - economic, social, and political - as well as the way that modern institutions (the state, market systems, the rule of law, and democratic accountability) developed and interacted with other factors across different societies around the world. The class will feature additional special guest lectures by Francis Fukuyama, Larry Diamond, Michael McFaul, Anna Grzymala-Busse, and other faculty and researchers affiliated with the Center on Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law. Undergraduate students should enroll in this course for 5 units. Graduate students should enroll for 3.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5

POLISCI 319: Directed Reading in International Relations

For PhD students. Directed reading in Political Science with a focus on international relations. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit

POLISCI 329: Directed Reading and Research in American Politics

For PhD students. Directed reading in Political Science with a focus on American politics. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit

POLISCI 334: Philanthropy and Civil Society (EDUC 374, SOC 374)

Cross-listed with Law ( LAW 781), Political Science ( POLISCI 334) and Sociology ( SOC 374). Associated with the Center for Philanthropy and Civil Society (PACS). Year-long workshop for doctoral students and advanced undergraduates writing senior theses on the nature of civil society or philanthropy. Focus is on pursuit of progressive research and writing contributing to the current scholarly knowledge of the nonprofit sector and philanthropy. Accomplished in a large part through peer review. Readings include recent scholarship in aforementioned fields. May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 9 units.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit

POLISCI 336S: Justice (ETHICSOC 171, PHIL 171, POLISCI 103, PUBLPOL 103C, PUBLPOL 307)

In this course, we explore three sets of questions relating to justice and the meaning of a just society: (1) Liberty: What is liberty, and why is it important? Which liberties must a just society protect? (2) Equality: What is equality, and why is it important? What sorts of equality should a just society ensure? (3) Reconciliation: Are liberty and equality in conflict? If so, how should we respond to the conflict between them? We approach these topics by examining competing theories of justice including utilitarianism, libertarianism/classical liberalism, and egalitarian liberalism. The class also serves as an introduction to how to do political philosophy, and students approaching these topics for the first time are welcome. Political Science majors taking this course to fulfill the WIM requirement should enroll in POLISCI 103.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5

POLISCI 339: Directed Reading and Research in Political Theory

For PhD students. Directed reading in Political Science with a focus on political theory. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit

POLISCI 344U: Political Culture (POLISCI 244U)

The implications of social norms, preferences and beliefs for political and economic behavior and societal outcomes.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5

POLISCI 349: Directed Reading and Research in Comparative Politics

For PhD students. Directed reading in Political Science with a focus on comparative politics. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit

POLISCI 353A: Workshop in Political Methodology

Mathematical and statistical models and applications to political science. Guest speakers, faculty, and students present research papers. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit

POLISCI 355A: Data Science for Politics (POLISCI 150A)

Data science is quickly changing the way we understand and and engage in the political process. In this course we will develop fundamental techniques of data science and apply them to large political datasets on elections, campaign finance, lobbying, and more. The objective is to give students the skills to carry out cutting edge quantitative political studies in both academia and the private sector. Students with technical backgrounds looking to study politics quantitatively are encouraged to enroll.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5
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