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151 - 160 of 161 results for: PHIL ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

PHIL 378B: Unequal Relationships (ETHICSOC 378B, POLISCI 338B)

Over the past three decades, a relational egalitarian conception of equality has emerged in political philosophy. Proponents of the view argue that the point of equality is to establish communities where people are able to stand and relate as equals. This entails building societies free from a variety of modes of relating that are thought to be detrimental to our status as moral equals. The list of those inegalitarian relationships is long and includes oppression, domination, exploitation, marginalization, objectification, demonization, infantilization, and stigmatization. The relational approach to equality departs from the more distributive conceptions of equality that were offered in the 70s and after. The theories of justice proposed in response are still comparatively underdeveloped and need further elaboration, but they all concur in rejecting both the overly distributive paradigm and the preoccupation with individual responsibility central to most other egalitarian accounts. Thi more »
Over the past three decades, a relational egalitarian conception of equality has emerged in political philosophy. Proponents of the view argue that the point of equality is to establish communities where people are able to stand and relate as equals. This entails building societies free from a variety of modes of relating that are thought to be detrimental to our status as moral equals. The list of those inegalitarian relationships is long and includes oppression, domination, exploitation, marginalization, objectification, demonization, infantilization, and stigmatization. The relational approach to equality departs from the more distributive conceptions of equality that were offered in the 70s and after. The theories of justice proposed in response are still comparatively underdeveloped and need further elaboration, but they all concur in rejecting both the overly distributive paradigm and the preoccupation with individual responsibility central to most other egalitarian accounts. This graduate seminar will introduce students to the rich literature on equality in contemporary political philosophy, with a special focus on identifying and scrutinizing unequal relationships. Each week will be centered on a specific type of such unequal relationship, trying to understand how it operates, what social function it serves, and what makes it specifically harmful or wrongful to groups and individuals. Although there are no formal pre-requisites, this class is primarily designed for students considering writing a thesis in political or moral theory as well as for students in other disciplines who want to advance their understanding of equality as a moral value. Seniors in philosophy and political science with a substantial training in political theory will also be considered and should email the PI to communicate their interest. 2 unit option only for Phil PhDs beyond the second year.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-4

PHIL 383: Advanced Topics in Epistemology

May be repeated for credit. 2 unit option is only for Phil PhD students beyond the second year.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-4 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Lawlor, K. (PI)

PHIL 384P: Mental Action and Its Pathologies

In this graduate seminar, we will examine the nature of mental action. What is mental action? What kinds of mental actions can we perform intentionally? Is there such a thing as paralysis of mental action? Are delusions of thought insertion pathologies of mental action? nnThis is a seminar mainly for graduate students in philosophy, but readings will include many sources from the cognitive sciences. Students taking the course for credit will be required to do a presentation and write a research paper. 2 unit option only for Philosophy PhDs beyond the second year.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-4
Instructors: Peacocke, A. (PI)

PHIL 384W: The Liar Paradox

This is a graduate seminar on the liar and related paradoxes. We will go over recent approaches, starting with Kripke's 1975 approach. Work on the liar by Field, McGee, Priest, and others will be discussed. We will cover both technical and philosophical issues related to the liar. This class is open to graduate students in philosophy, all others need explicit permission. 2 unit option is for 3rd year Philosophy PhDs only.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 2-4
Instructors: Warren, J. (PI)

PHIL 385B: Topics in Metaphysics and Epistemology: Indexicals and Self-Knowledge

2 unit option for PhD students only. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-4 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Perry, J. (PI)

PHIL 388: Topics in Normativity

Topics in Normativity. Normative Consciousness. May be repeated for credit. 2 unit option for PhD students only.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-4 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Taylor, K. (PI)

PHIL 391: Seminar on Logic & Formal Philosophy (MATH 391)

Research seminar for graduate students working in logic and formal philosophy. Presentations on contemporary topics by seminar participants and outside visitors. Maybe be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 2-4 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Icard, T. (PI)

PHIL 450: Thesis

(Staff)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit

PHIL 500: Advanced Dissertation Seminar

Presentation of dissertation work in progress by seminar participants. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit

PHIL 801: TGR Project

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 0 | Repeatable for credit
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