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131 - 140 of 161 results for: PHIL ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

PHIL 302P: Plato's Laws X

Grad seminar. Close reading and analysis of Book 10 of Plato's Laws. In this book, Plato's political thought intersects with his philosophic theology (and therein also with his physics and metaphysics) as he considers the appropriate handling of god(s) by the polis and argues against atheism, deism, and conventional propitiatory theism. 2 unit option only for Philosophy PhDs beyond the second year.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-4
Instructors: Pinto, R. (PI)

PHIL 313W: Aristotle on Virtues

Graduate seminar. 2 unit option only for Phil PhDs beyond the second year.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-4

PHIL 317: Topics in Plato: Plato on Practical Rationality

Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 2-4 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Bobonich, C. (PI)

PHIL 322: Hume

Hume's theoretical philosophy emphasizing skepticism and naturalism, the theory of ideas and belief, space and time, causation and necessity, induction and laws of nature, miracles, a priori reasoning, the external world, and the identity of the self. 2 unit option only for Philosophy PhD students beyond the relevant PhD distribution requirements. Prerequisites: Undergraduates wishing to take this course must have previously taken History of Modern Philosophy or the equivalent, and may only enroll with permission from the instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-4

PHIL 327: Scientific Philosophy: From Kant to Kuhn and Beyond

Examines the development of scientific philosophy from Kant, through the Naturphilosophie of Schelling and Hegel, to the neo-Kantian scientific tradition initiated by Hermann von Helmholtz and the neo-Kantian history and philosophy of science of Ernst Cassirer and Thomas Kuhn. Proposes a post-Kuhnian approach to the history and philosophy of science in light of these developments.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-4 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Friedman, M. (PI)

PHIL 329: Plotinus and Augustine (PHIL 229, RELIGST 269, RELIGST 369)

Professor's permission required to register. A reading course focused on the influence of Plotinus Enneads on Augustine's Confessions, early dialogues, and sections on reason and memory in the De trinitate. Proficiency in Greek and Latin will be helpful but is not required. Professor's prior permission required, interested students should contact the professor about course schedule: tsheehan@stanford.edu . Undergraduates register for 200-level for 5 units. Graduate students register for 300-level for 3-5 units.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Sheehan, T. (PI)

PHIL 333: Philosophy, Literature, and the Arts Core Seminar (DLCL 333, ENGLISH 333, MUSIC 332)

This course serves as the Core Seminar for the PhD Minor in Philosophy, Literature, and the Arts. It introduces students to a wide range of topics at the intersection of philosophy with literary and arts criticism. The seminar is intended for graduate students. It is suitable for theoretically ambitious students of literature and the arts, philosophers with interests in value theory, aesthetics, and topics in language and mind, and other students with strong interest in the psychological importance of engagement with the arts. May be repeated for credit. In this year¿s installment, we focus on how artistic kinds or genres help set the terms on which individual works are experienced, understood, and valued, with special attention to lyric poetry and music.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-4 | Repeatable for credit

PHIL 335: Topics in Aesthetics

Much of the seminar will focus on notions of abstraction in the arts (and related notions of formalism)¿in painting, music, poetry, etc. What is it for a work to be abstract, or more or less abstract than other works? How is abstraction important, and how is it related to aesthetic value and to values of other kinds? I understand abstraction to consist in the absence or limitation of one or another kind of aboutness: representation in any of several senses, semantic properties, pragmatic implications, meanings of one sort or another, etc. There are many of different kinds of aboutness, and so many corresponding varieties of abstraction. Readings will be by an assortment of philosophers, critics, music theorists, art historians etc., probably including Clive Bell, Roger Fry, Ernst Gombrich, Clement Greenberg, Eduard Hanslick, Eileen John, Peter Kivy, Peter Lamarque, Suzanne Langer, Alexander Nehamas, Roger Scruton, Richard Wollheim. I will try out some of my own recent work-in-progress. more »
Much of the seminar will focus on notions of abstraction in the arts (and related notions of formalism)¿in painting, music, poetry, etc. What is it for a work to be abstract, or more or less abstract than other works? How is abstraction important, and how is it related to aesthetic value and to values of other kinds? I understand abstraction to consist in the absence or limitation of one or another kind of aboutness: representation in any of several senses, semantic properties, pragmatic implications, meanings of one sort or another, etc. There are many of different kinds of aboutness, and so many corresponding varieties of abstraction. Readings will be by an assortment of philosophers, critics, music theorists, art historians etc., probably including Clive Bell, Roger Fry, Ernst Gombrich, Clement Greenberg, Eduard Hanslick, Eileen John, Peter Kivy, Peter Lamarque, Suzanne Langer, Alexander Nehamas, Roger Scruton, Richard Wollheim. I will try out some of my own recent work-in-progress. The course will be organized as a seminar. Students will work on projects, term papers, and present drafts to the group, so we can help one another. They will also be asked to give short informal presentations on readings to be discussed. The topics we cover after the first several meetings will depend partly on what projects students choose, as well as our interests. There are lots of great possibilities, including, of course, exploring various kinds of aboutness. Grades will be based on the term papers and participation in the seminar. This course is intended for graduate students. Qualified undergraduates are welcome, but instructor permission is required.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Walton, K. (PI)

PHIL 347: Aristotle's Logic (CLASSICS 197, CLASSICS 397)

In this seminar we read through Aristotle's Prior Analytics, paying close attention to the relation between Aristotle's logic to Greek mathematics, and to its place within Aristotle's overall philosophy. Knowledge of Greek is not required. Open to advanced undergraduate students.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5

PHIL 359: Topics in Logic, Information and Agency

Logical analysis of information, interaction and games, with topics connecting philosophy, computer science, game theory, and other fields. The focus is on current research at these interfaces. Prerequisite: 151, 154/254, or equivalent background. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-4 | Repeatable for credit
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