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11 - 20 of 49 results for: PHIL

PHIL 152: Computability and Logic (PHIL 252)

Approaches to effective computation: recursive functions, register machines, and Turing machines. Proof of their equivalence, discussion of Church's thesis. Elementary recursion theory. These techniques used to prove Gödel's incompleteness theorem for arithmetic, whose technical and philosophical repercussions are surveyed. Prerequisite: 151.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Math | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Briggs, R. (PI)

PHIL 156A: Modal Logics - A Modern Perspective (PHIL 256A)

Modal logic encompasses a rich variety of systems that have been used within philosophy to study such diverse topics as necessity and possibility, knowledge, time, action, and deontology. In recent years modal logic has also found applications outside of philosophy, in mathematics (the study of topology and formal provability) and in computational theory (including knowledge representation and software verification). This course will offer a modern approach to modal logic, covering the classical themes as well as cutting edge approaches and topics, such as hybrid logics and dynamic logics.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PHIL 169: Evolution of the Social Contract (PHIL 269)

Explore naturalizing the social contract. Classroom presentations and term papers.nTexts: Binmore - Natural Justicen Skyrms - Evolution of the Social Contract.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Skyrms, B. (PI)

PHIL 171P: 20th Century Political Theory: Liberalism and its Critics (ETHICSOC 130, POLISCI 130)

In this course, students learn and engage with the debates that have animated political theory since the early 20th century. What is the proper relationship between the individual, the community, and the state? Are liberty and equality in conflict, and, if so, which should take priority? What does justice mean in a large and diverse modern society? The subtitle of the course, borrowed from a book by Michael Sandel, is "Liberalism and its Critics" because the questions we discuss in this class center on the meaning of, and alternatives to, the liberal idea that the basic goal of society should be the protection of individual rights. Readings include selections from works by John Rawls, Hannah Arendt, Robert Nozick, Michael Sandel, Iris Marion Young, and Martha Nussbaum. No prior experience with political theory is necessary.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Coyne, B. (PI)

PHIL 173B: Metaethics

This is an intensive, undergraduate-only introduction to, and survey of, contemporary metaethics. Can moral and ethical values be justified or is it just a matter of opinion? Is there a difference between facts and values? Are there any moral truths? Does it matter if there are not? Focus is not on which things or actions are valuable or morally right, but what is value or rightness itself. Prerequisites: 1, 80 and 181.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Hussain, N. (PI)

PHIL 174B: Universal Basic Income: the philosophy behind the proposal (ETHICSOC 174B, ETHICSOC 274B, PHIL 274B, POLISCI 338)

The past three decades have seen the elaboration of a vast body of literature on unconditional basic income a radical policy proposal Philippe Van Parijs referred to as a disarmingly simple idea. It consists of a monthly cash allowance given to all citizens, regardless of personal desert and without means test to provide them with a standard of living above the poverty line. The seminar will seek to engage students in normative debates in political theory (feminism, liberalism, republicanism, communism, libertarianism, etc.) by appealing to the concrete example of basic income. It will allow students to learn a great deal about a policy that is gaining tremendous currency in academic and public debates, while discussing and learning about prominent political theorists - many of whom have written against or for basic income at one point in their career.nnnThe seminar is open to undergraduate and graduate students in all departments. There are no pre-requisites. We will ask questions suc more »
The past three decades have seen the elaboration of a vast body of literature on unconditional basic income a radical policy proposal Philippe Van Parijs referred to as a disarmingly simple idea. It consists of a monthly cash allowance given to all citizens, regardless of personal desert and without means test to provide them with a standard of living above the poverty line. The seminar will seek to engage students in normative debates in political theory (feminism, liberalism, republicanism, communism, libertarianism, etc.) by appealing to the concrete example of basic income. It will allow students to learn a great deal about a policy that is gaining tremendous currency in academic and public debates, while discussing and learning about prominent political theorists - many of whom have written against or for basic income at one point in their career.nnnThe seminar is open to undergraduate and graduate students in all departments. There are no pre-requisites. We will ask questions such as: is giving people cash no strings attached desirable and just? Would basic income promote a more gender equal society through the remuneration of care-work, or would it risks further entrenching the position of women as care-givers? Would alternative policies be more successful (such as the job guarantees, stakeholder grants or a negative income tax)? How can we test out basic income? What makes for a reliable and ethical basic income pilot? Students in Politics, Philosophy, Public Policy, Social Work, and Sociology should find most of those questions relevant to their interests. Some discussions on how to fund basic income, on the macro-economic implications of basic income and on the existing pilots projects (in Finland, Namibia, India, Canada and the US) may be of interest to Economists; while our readings on the impact of new technologies and artificial intelligence on the future of work and whether a basic income could be a solution, are likely to be on interest to computer scientists and engineers. By the end of the class, students will have an in depth knowledge of the policy and will have developed skills in the normative analysis of public policy. They will be able to deploy those critical and analytical skills to assess a broad range of other policies.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PHIL 183: Self-knowledge and Metacognition (PHIL 283)

The course will be divided into two parts. In the first, we will survey the dominant models of how we come to know our own mental states. Among the issues we will explore will be our ways of discovering and coming to terms with "implicit" attitudes (e.g. biases), and the role of expression (e.g. verbal expression) in coming to know such attitudes. In the second part of the course, we will investigate the broader set of capacities by which we monitor and regulate our own cognitive processes, while paying special attention to the role of feelings (e.g. of knowing, fluency, fit) in the exercise of these capacities.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PHIL 183B: Philosophy of Creativity (PHIL 283B)

Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PHIL 189G: Fine-Tuning Arguments for God's Existence

We will carefully assess contemporary "fine-tuning" arguments for the existence of God. Some argue that life only exists because certain fundamental characteristics of the universe are set precisely in the way needed for life; small variations would have resulted in no life. Thus the universe seems to be "fine-tuned" for life. This apparent fine-tuning is used to defend the existence of a "fine-tuner", namely, God. Pre-requisites: PHIL 1 and PHIL 80 and a basic high-school level understanding of probability.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Hussain, N. (PI)

PHIL 194Z: Capstone: Misanthropy and Literature

Our guiding question in this course will be what value misanthropic literature has, particularly when there's so much praise for writers whose work contains a so-called generous spirit. When we appreciate the writing of someone like Thomas Bernhard¿a notorious misanthrope¿what exactly are we appreciating? Is it some manner of catharsis? Or is it a purely formal affair, a strict matter of aesthetic content? Or are we somehow appreciating the expression of misanthropy itself? These questions will take us into the domains of ethics, psychology, literary criticism, and, of course, artistic value. We'll explore the paradox of tragedy, theories of moralism, theories of humor, and the distinction between form and content.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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