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1 - 10 of 26 results for: PATHWAYS::philan

AFRICAST 135: Designing Research-Based Interventions to Solve Global Health Problems (AFRICAST 235, EDUC 135, EDUC 335, HRP 235, HUMBIO 26, MED 235)

The excitement around social innovation and entrepreneurship has spawned numerous startups focused on tackling world problems, particularly in the fields of education and health. The best social ventures are launched with careful consideration paid to research, design, and efficacy. This course offers students insights into understanding how to effectively develop, evaluate, and scale social ventures. Using TeachAIDS (an award-winning nonprofit educational technology social venture used in 78 countries) as a primary case study, students will be given an in-depth look into how the entity was founded and scaled globally. Guest speakers will include world-class experts and entrepreneurs in Philanthropy, Medicine, Communications, Education, and Technology. Open to both undergraduate and graduate students.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

AFRICAST 235: Designing Research-Based Interventions to Solve Global Health Problems (AFRICAST 135, EDUC 135, EDUC 335, HRP 235, HUMBIO 26, MED 235)

The excitement around social innovation and entrepreneurship has spawned numerous startups focused on tackling world problems, particularly in the fields of education and health. The best social ventures are launched with careful consideration paid to research, design, and efficacy. This course offers students insights into understanding how to effectively develop, evaluate, and scale social ventures. Using TeachAIDS (an award-winning nonprofit educational technology social venture used in 78 countries) as a primary case study, students will be given an in-depth look into how the entity was founded and scaled globally. Guest speakers will include world-class experts and entrepreneurs in Philanthropy, Medicine, Communications, Education, and Technology. Open to both undergraduate and graduate students.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 337: The Politics of Humanitarianism

What does it mean to want to help, to organize humanitarian aid, in times of crisis? At first glance, the impulse to help issui generis a good one. Helping is surely preferable to indifference and inaction. This does not mean that humanitarian interventions entail no ethical or political stakes or that they are beyond engaged critique. We need to critique precisely that which we value, and to ask some hard questions, among them these: What are the differences among humanitarianism, charity, and philanthropy? What of social obligations and solidarities? How does the neoliberal world order currently create structural inequalities that ensure the reproduction of poverty and violence? How does the current order of things resemble or differ from the colonial world order? This course examines the history of humanitarian sensibilities and the emergence of organized action in the cause of humanity. In the early years of humanitarian intervention, political neutrality was a key principle; it ha more »
What does it mean to want to help, to organize humanitarian aid, in times of crisis? At first glance, the impulse to help issui generis a good one. Helping is surely preferable to indifference and inaction. This does not mean that humanitarian interventions entail no ethical or political stakes or that they are beyond engaged critique. We need to critique precisely that which we value, and to ask some hard questions, among them these: What are the differences among humanitarianism, charity, and philanthropy? What of social obligations and solidarities? How does the neoliberal world order currently create structural inequalities that ensure the reproduction of poverty and violence? How does the current order of things resemble or differ from the colonial world order? This course examines the history of humanitarian sensibilities and the emergence of organized action in the cause of humanity. In the early years of humanitarian intervention, political neutrality was a key principle; it has now come under ever greater analytical and political scrutiny. We will examine the reasons for the politicization and militarization of aid -- be it humanitarian aid in natural disasters or political crises; development programs in the impoverished south (¿the Third World¿), or peace-keeping. We will end with a critical exploration of the concept of human rights, humanity, and personhood. The overall methodological aim of the course is to demonstrate what insights an ethnographic approach to the politics, ethics, and aesthetics of humanitarianism can offer. Prerequisite, by instructor consent.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Autumn 2016 | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CSRE 178: Ethics and Politics of Public Service (ETHICSOC 133, HUMBIO 178, PHIL 175A, PHIL 275A, POLISCI 133, PUBLPOL 103D, URBANST 122)

Ethical and political questions in public service work, including volunteering, service learning, humanitarian assistance, and public service professions such as medicine and teaching. Motives and outcomes in service work. Connections between service work and justice. Is mandatory service an oxymoron? History of public service in the U.S. Issues in crosscultural service work. Integration with the Haas Center for Public Service to connect service activities and public service aspirations with academic experiences at Stanford.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2018 | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-ER | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EDUC 135: Designing Research-Based Interventions to Solve Global Health Problems (AFRICAST 135, AFRICAST 235, EDUC 335, HRP 235, HUMBIO 26, MED 235)

The excitement around social innovation and entrepreneurship has spawned numerous startups focused on tackling world problems, particularly in the fields of education and health. The best social ventures are launched with careful consideration paid to research, design, and efficacy. This course offers students insights into understanding how to effectively develop, evaluate, and scale social ventures. Using TeachAIDS (an award-winning nonprofit educational technology social venture used in 78 countries) as a primary case study, students will be given an in-depth look into how the entity was founded and scaled globally. Guest speakers will include world-class experts and entrepreneurs in Philanthropy, Medicine, Communications, Education, and Technology. Open to both undergraduate and graduate students.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EDUC 374: Philanthropy and Civil Society (POLISCI 334, SOC 374)

Cross-listed with Law ( LAW 781), Political Science ( POLISCI 334) and Sociology ( SOC 374). Associated with the Center for Philanthropy and Civil Society (PACS). Year-long workshop for doctoral students and advanced undergraduates writing senior theses on the nature of civil society or philanthropy. Focus is on pursuit of progressive research and writing contributing to the current scholarly knowledge of the nonprofit sector and philanthropy. Accomplished in a large part through peer review. Readings include recent scholarship in aforementioned fields. May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 9 units.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EDUC 377C: Philanthropy: Strategy, Innovation and Social Change

You have extraordinary potential to create social change, and Philanthropy: Strategy, Innovation and Social Change will empower you with the skills, experience and inspiration to actualize that potential. Regardless of your profession, industry, background, age, resource form or amount, this course will amplify your ability to make your giving, volunteering, service and leadership matter more. Through deep introspection you will develop your individual social change strategy and define and/or refine your social passions and philanthropic purpose. You will develop and apply skills essential to effective philanthropy, including creating a mission statement, mapping a social issue ecosystem, developing a philanthropic strategy and mitigating risk. You will create a theory of change that maps how you will transform your values and resources (including intellectual, human, network and financial capital) into measurable social change. You will also create a logic model, assess nonprofits and more »
You have extraordinary potential to create social change, and Philanthropy: Strategy, Innovation and Social Change will empower you with the skills, experience and inspiration to actualize that potential. Regardless of your profession, industry, background, age, resource form or amount, this course will amplify your ability to make your giving, volunteering, service and leadership matter more. Through deep introspection you will develop your individual social change strategy and define and/or refine your social passions and philanthropic purpose. You will develop and apply skills essential to effective philanthropy, including creating a mission statement, mapping a social issue ecosystem, developing a philanthropic strategy and mitigating risk. You will create a theory of change that maps how you will transform your values and resources (including intellectual, human, network and financial capital) into measurable social change. You will also create a logic model, assess nonprofits and grant proposals, evaluate nonprofit programs and social change initiatives and develop strategies to share learning and increase impact. Case studies will illuminate diverse philanthropic models and approaches¿private foundations, corporate giving vehicles, venture philanthropy and LLCs, as well as policy change, advocacy and impact investing. Class activities will include role-plays, debates and simulations such as creating personal giving strategies, exploring the power dynamics of grantor-grantee relationships, giving funding pitches and assessing foundation grant proposals. Each student will select and evaluate a local nonprofit and create a formal grant proposal. Students will peer-review grant proposals, participate in a multi-stage grantmaking process and allocate $20,000 of grants funded by The Learning by Giving Foundation and Andreessen Philanthropies. Students will also have the unique opportunity to directly connect and engage with globally renowned philanthropic leaders, including Laura Muñoz Arnold (Arnold Foundation), Dr. Priscilla Chan (Chan Zuckerberg Initiative), Dr. Sandra Hernández (California Health Care Foundation), Laurene Powell Jobs (Emerson Collective), Dr. Alex Karp (Palantir), Dr. Judith Rodin (Rockefeller Foundation) and Darren Walker (Ford Foundation), among others.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EDUC 377E: Improving and Measuring Social Impact

(Also GSBGEN 322). This course focuses on strategy and actionable measurement in government, non-profit organizations, market-based social enterprises, philanthropy, and impact investing. ¿Actionable¿ means that measurement is used by managers, investors, and other stakeholders in improving outcomes. The course explores the intersection of several ideas that seem to be in some tension with each other. (1) ¿In preparing for battle I have always found that plans are useless, but planning is indispensable.¿ (Dwight D. Eisenhower), (2) You can¿t manage what you can¿t measure, (3) Measurement is expensive and its results are often ignored, (4) ¿Not everything that counts can be counted and not everything that can be counted counts¿ (apocryphally attributed to Einstein), (5) ¿The more any quantitative social indicator is used for decision making, the more subject it will be to corruption pressures and the more apt it will be to distort and corrupt the social processes it is intended to moni more »
(Also GSBGEN 322). This course focuses on strategy and actionable measurement in government, non-profit organizations, market-based social enterprises, philanthropy, and impact investing. ¿Actionable¿ means that measurement is used by managers, investors, and other stakeholders in improving outcomes. The course explores the intersection of several ideas that seem to be in some tension with each other. (1) ¿In preparing for battle I have always found that plans are useless, but planning is indispensable.¿ (Dwight D. Eisenhower), (2) You can¿t manage what you can¿t measure, (3) Measurement is expensive and its results are often ignored, (4) ¿Not everything that counts can be counted and not everything that can be counted counts¿ (apocryphally attributed to Einstein), (5) ¿The more any quantitative social indicator is used for decision making, the more subject it will be to corruption pressures and the more apt it will be to distort and corrupt the social processes it is intended to monitor.¿ (Campbell¿s Law). Specifically, the course will include: strategic planning, logic models, theories of change, monitoring, and evaluation; measuring the social impact of governments, non-governmental organizations, and market-based social enterprises, and asking how philanthropists and impact investors can assess their own impact; impact investing, performance contracting, and social impact bonds; and techniques for improving the behavior and accountability of individuals and organizations. These issues will be addressed mainly through business school case studies, which place the students in the position of CEOs, managers, and investors called upon to make major decisions. WARNING: The course has a fair amount of reading - not more than is common in undergraduate and graduate courses, but more than is typical for MBA courses in the GSB.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Autumn 2015 | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ETHICSOC 133: Ethics and Politics of Public Service (CSRE 178, HUMBIO 178, PHIL 175A, PHIL 275A, POLISCI 133, PUBLPOL 103D, URBANST 122)

Ethical and political questions in public service work, including volunteering, service learning, humanitarian assistance, and public service professions such as medicine and teaching. Motives and outcomes in service work. Connections between service work and justice. Is mandatory service an oxymoron? History of public service in the U.S. Issues in crosscultural service work. Integration with the Haas Center for Public Service to connect service activities and public service aspirations with academic experiences at Stanford.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2018 | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-ER | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ETHICSOC 232T: Theories and Practices of Civil Society, Philanthropy, and the Nonprofit Sector (POLISCI 236, POLISCI 236S)

What is the basis of private action for the public good? How are charitable dollars distributed and what role do nonprofit organizations and philanthropic dollars play in a modern democracy? In the ¿Philanthropy Lab¿ component of the course, students will award $100,000 in grants to local nonprofits. Students will explore how nonprofit organizations operate domestically and globally as well as the historical development and modern structure of civil society and philanthropy. Readings in political philosophy, history, political sociology, and public policy. Political Science majors who are taking this course to fulfill the WIM requirement should enroll in POLISCI 236S.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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