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1 - 9 of 9 results for: PATHWAYS::activism ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

COMPMED 85N: Animal Use in Biomedical Research

Preference to freshmen. How and why animals are used in biomedical science. Addresses human and animal disease entities and how animal research has contributed to the treatment and cure of disease. SignificantnPreference to freshmen. How and why animals are used in biomedical science. Addresses human and animal health and how animal research has contributed to the treatment and cure of disease. Significant portions of this course are devoted to documenting the humane care and treatment of laboratory animals in research, including, but not limited to such topics as law and ethics, animal behavior, animal modeling, and the animal activist movement. Course topics will also include: history of animals in research, environmental enrichment for research animals, and research animals in the media.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3

CSRE 108: Introduction to Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies (AMSTUD 107, FEMGEN 101, TAPS 108)

Introduction to interdisciplinary approaches to gender, sexuality, queer, trans and feminist studies. Topics include the emergence of sexuality studies in the academy, social justice and new subjects, science and technology, art and activism, history, film and memory, the documentation and performance of difference, and relevant socio-economic and political formations such as work and the family. Students learn to think critically about race, gender, and sexuality from local and global perspectives.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-SI

FEMGEN 101: Introduction to Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies (AMSTUD 107, CSRE 108, TAPS 108)

Introduction to interdisciplinary approaches to gender, sexuality, queer, trans and feminist studies. Topics include the emergence of sexuality studies in the academy, social justice and new subjects, science and technology, art and activism, history, film and memory, the documentation and performance of difference, and relevant socio-economic and political formations such as work and the family. Students learn to think critically about race, gender, and sexuality from local and global perspectives.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI, WAY-ED, GER:EC-Gender, GER:DB-SocSci
Instructors: Crandall, M. (PI)

HISTORY 54N: African American Women's Lives

This course encourages students to think critically about historical sources and to use creative and rigorous historical methods to recover African American women¿s experiences, which often have been placed on the periphery of American history and American life.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED
Instructors: Hobbs, A. (PI)

MED 228: Physicians and Social Responsibility

Social and political context of the roles of physicians and health professionals in social change; policy, advocacy, and shaping public attitudes. How physicians have influenced governmental policy on nuclear arms proliferation; environmental health concerns; physicians in government; activism through research; the effects of poverty on health; homelessness; and gun violence. Guest speakers from national and international NGOs.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1
Instructors: Laws, A. (PI)

OB 632: Social Movements

Social movement activists frequently target organizations (e.g., corporations, universities) in order to bring about political and social change. Because most organizations are not democracies, movements must find ways to penetrate their closed boundaries if they are to have an influence inside organizations. At the same time, social movements create organizational structures that help them carry out their goals, reproduce their missions and tactics, and effectively generate collective action. The purpose of this course is to examine the complex relationship between social movements and organizations. In order to understand the empirical link between movements and organizations, we will rely on social movement and organizational theory. Like the phenomena they seek to explain, these theories are strongly intertwined. In this course, we will cover topics related to how movements use organizations to propel change, and topics related to how movements help generate social change by targeting organizations. We will also evaluate the theoretical developments at the nexus of these two literatures, identifying the major innovations as well as looking for new research opportunities.
Terms: Win | Units: 3
Instructors: Soule, S. (PI)

PWR 2KTA: Writing & Rhetoric 2: A Rebel With A Cause: The Rhetoric of Giving a Damn

PWR 2 courses focus on developing strategies for presenting research-based arguments in both written and oral/multimedia genres. This course takes as its theme the relation between propaganda and truth. We'll study and practice the effective, ethical delivery of argument - including the role of propaganda in argument - as a vital rhetorical skill. In this course, we will explore a variety of movements from marriage equality and civil rights to climate change. A full course description and video can be found here: pwrcourses.stanford.edu/pwr2/pwr2kta For the PWR course catalog please visit https://pwrcourses.stanford.edu/ Enrollment is handled by the PWR office. Prerequisite: PWR 1.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: Writing 2
Instructors: Tarr, K. (PI)

RELIGST 119: Religion and Conflict

Conflicts involving religions are among the most vexing challenges facing international agencies, governments, institutions, and - above all - humanity. Although religion is often used as a descriptor of a conflict (Jewish - Muslim conflict in the Middle East, Christian-Muslim conflict in Sudan, Catholic-Protestant conflict in Northern Ireland) the impact of religion on creating and resolving these disputes is not well understood. It is indeed difficult, and at times impossible or undesirable, to separate religious from economic, political, agricultural, environmental, and cultural factors. This class will give students an opportunity to delve deeply into the histories, causes, and cultures involved in religious conflict. We will also challenge the assumption that different religions or particular religions are prone to conflict or tend towards violence. By studying resolutions to conflicts and looking at cases of inter-religious dialogue and cooperation, students will be able to count more »
Conflicts involving religions are among the most vexing challenges facing international agencies, governments, institutions, and - above all - humanity. Although religion is often used as a descriptor of a conflict (Jewish - Muslim conflict in the Middle East, Christian-Muslim conflict in Sudan, Catholic-Protestant conflict in Northern Ireland) the impact of religion on creating and resolving these disputes is not well understood. It is indeed difficult, and at times impossible or undesirable, to separate religious from economic, political, agricultural, environmental, and cultural factors. This class will give students an opportunity to delve deeply into the histories, causes, and cultures involved in religious conflict. We will also challenge the assumption that different religions or particular religions are prone to conflict or tend towards violence. By studying resolutions to conflicts and looking at cases of inter-religious dialogue and cooperation, students will be able to counter stereotypes and move beyond the rhetoric surrounding religion and conflict. The course will be both theoretical and practical. We will study how religious conflicts have been addressed academically and in policy discussions. We will also explore how religious beliefs, institutions, and actors have exacerbated or mitigated conflicts and facilitated or thwarted their resolutions. To illustrate these theories each section is accompanied by an examination of particular case studies of religious conflicts, some resolved and others ongoing, and efforts at religious peacebuilding, some successful and others not. Each student will then produce her or his own case study of a conflict or a comparison of conflicts as a final project.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-ER
Instructors: Bigelow, A. (PI)

TAPS 108: Introduction to Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies (AMSTUD 107, CSRE 108, FEMGEN 101)

Introduction to interdisciplinary approaches to gender, sexuality, queer, trans and feminist studies. Topics include the emergence of sexuality studies in the academy, social justice and new subjects, science and technology, art and activism, history, film and memory, the documentation and performance of difference, and relevant socio-economic and political formations such as work and the family. Students learn to think critically about race, gender, and sexuality from local and global perspectives.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI
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