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51 - 60 of 95 results for: PATHWAYS::* ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

HISTORY 327: East European Women and War in the 20th Century (FEMGEN 227, HISTORY 227)

Thematic chronological approach through conflicts in the region: Balkan Wars, WWI, WWII, and Yugoslav wars. Ways women in E. Europe involved in and affected by wars; comparison with women in W. Europe in the two world wars. Examines women's involvement in war as members of military services, backbone of underground movements, workers in war industries, mothers of soldiers, subjects and supporters of war aims and propaganda, activists in peace movements, and objects of wartime destruction, dislocation, and sexual violation.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5
Instructors: Jolluck, K. (PI)

HISTORY 399A: Preparing for International Field Work: Public Service or Research (HISTORY 299X)

Open to students in all classes, those planning internships abroad and those planning research, from juniors with honors theses and sophomores with Chappell Lougee grants to freshmen thinking ahead. Introduces resources on campus for planning international research and service. Raises issues that need to be considered in advance of going abroad: ethical concerns, Human Subjects Protocol, networking, personal safety and gender issues, confronting cultural differences. Exposes students to research methods: case studies, interviewing, working in foreign libraries and archives.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1

HRP 89Q: Introduction to Cross Cultural Issues in Medicine

Preference to sophomores. Introduction to social factors that impact health care delivery, such as ethnicity, immigration, language barriers, and patient service expectations. Focus is on developing a framework to understand culturally unique and non-English speaking populations in the health care system.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-AmerCul
Instructors: Corso, I. (PI)

HRP 218: Methods for Health Care Delivery Innovation, Implementation and Evaluation (CHPR 212, MED 212)

Preference given to postgraduate fellows and graduate students. Focus is on implementation science and evaluation of health care delivery innovations. Topics include implementation science theory, frameworks, and measurement principles; qualitative and quantitative approaches to designing and evaluating new health care models; hybrid design trials that simultaneously evaluate implementation and effectiveness; distinction between quality improvement and research, and implications for regulatory requirements and publication; and grant-writing strategies for implementation science and evaluation. Students will develop a mock (or actual) grant proposal to conduct a needs assessment or evaluate a Stanford/VA/community intervention, incorporating concepts, frameworks, and methods discussed in class. Priority for enrollment for CHPR 212 will be given to CHPR master's students.
Terms: Win | Units: 2

HRP 235: Designing Research-Based Interventions to Solve Global Health Problems (AFRICAST 135, AFRICAST 235, EDUC 135, EDUC 335, HUMBIO 26, MED 235)

The excitement around social innovation and entrepreneurship has spawned numerous startups focused on tackling world problems, particularly in the fields of education and health. The best social ventures are launched with careful consideration paid to research, design, and efficacy. This course offers students insights into understanding how to effectively develop, evaluate, and scale social ventures. Using TeachAIDS (an award-winning nonprofit educational technology social venture used in 78 countries) as a primary case study, students will be given an in-depth look into how the entity was founded and scaled globally. Guest speakers will include world-class experts and entrepreneurs in Philanthropy, Medicine, Communications, Education, and Technology. Open to both undergraduate and graduate students.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4

HUMBIO 26: Designing Research-Based Interventions to Solve Global Health Problems (AFRICAST 135, AFRICAST 235, EDUC 135, EDUC 335, HRP 235, MED 235)

The excitement around social innovation and entrepreneurship has spawned numerous startups focused on tackling world problems, particularly in the fields of education and health. The best social ventures are launched with careful consideration paid to research, design, and efficacy. This course offers students insights into understanding how to effectively develop, evaluate, and scale social ventures. Using TeachAIDS (an award-winning nonprofit educational technology social venture used in 78 countries) as a primary case study, students will be given an in-depth look into how the entity was founded and scaled globally. Guest speakers will include world-class experts and entrepreneurs in Philanthropy, Medicine, Communications, Education, and Technology. Open to both undergraduate and graduate students.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4

HUMBIO 178: Ethics and Politics of Public Service (CSRE 178, ETHICSOC 133, PHIL 175A, PHIL 275A, POLISCI 133, PUBLPOL 103D, URBANST 122)

Ethical and political questions in public service work, including volunteering, service learning, humanitarian assistance, and public service professions such as medicine and teaching. Motives and outcomes in service work. Connections between service work and justice. Is mandatory service an oxymoron? History of public service in the U.S. Issues in crosscultural service work. Integration with the Haas Center for Public Service to connect service activities and public service aspirations with academic experiences at Stanford.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-ER

LAW 805C: Policy Practicum: Campaign Finance Task Force

This policy practicum will engage students to perform research on a number of topics related to the financing of election campaigns, with a particular eye on developments that have taken place in the 2016 election. The client is a national campaign finance task force led by former White House Counsel Robert Bauer and former Romney and Bush campaign Counsel Ben Ginsberg. Research areas would include: How has the financing of campaigns changed following Citizens United? How have candidates, parties and groups altered spending to account for the rise of the internet as a medium of political communication? Have developments in outside spending affected the power of political parties? How has primary campaign spending changed as a result of rising political polarization? This policy practicum will not meet regularly; each student will meet periodically with Professor Persily to determine a research topic and a strategy for developing a paper to be handed in by the end of the term. Elements used in grading: Final Paper. -- NOTE: Students may not count more than a combined total of eight units of directed research projects and policy lab practica toward graduation unless the additional counted units are approved in advance by the Petitions Committee. Such approval will be granted only for good cause shown. Even in the case of a successful petition for additional units, a student cannot receive a letter grade for more than eight units of independent research (Policy Lab practicum, Directed Research, Directed Writing, Senior Thesis, and/or Research Track). Any units taken in excess of eight will be graded on a mandatory pass basis. For detailed information, see "Directed Research/Policy Labs" in the SLS Student Handbook. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Persily, N. (PI)

LAW 805F: Policy Practicum: Endstage Decisions: Health Directives in Law and Practice

(Formerly Law 413Z) Medical decisions toward the end of life can be crucial and difficult for patients, doctors, and the families of patients. Law and medicine have been struggling to find ways to strike a balance between what the patients might want (or say they want), and what makes medical, economic, and ethical sense. People have been encouraged to fill out "Advanced Health Care Directives," which give guidance to doctors and surrogates (usually a family member) on what to do when faced with end-of-life dilemmas. Another form, adopted in just over half the states (including California) is the POLST form (Physician Orders for Life-Sustaining Treatment). The two types are supposed to complement each other, but they are different in important ways. The Advanced Health Care Directive expresses what a person wants, or thinks she wants, and/or appoints a surrogate in case the patient is unable to express her wishes. Anybody can fill out a Directive, at any time of life. Ideally, a copy goes to the surrogate, if one is appointed, and another to the primary care physician. The POLST form is meant for people who are seriously ill. It is a one page form, printed on bright pink paper. It is signed by patient and doctor. The directives (for example "no artificial nutrition by tube") are supposed to be controlling; the patient, of course, can change her mind; but there is no surrogate. It is an agreement between the patient and the doctor. Who uses these forms? How effective are they? To what extent and in what situations are they useful? In what situations are they not useful? Can they be made more useful and, if so, how? Students will look at some of the current literature on the topic and work from past practicum work, but the main point is to find out what local hospitals and nursing homes are doing. Students will conduct interviews with doctors, nurses, and other health care specialists in order to find out what one might call the living law of the Directive and of POLST. The aim is to get a more realistic picture of the situation in the area: How are these forms used? When are they used? What is the experience of health care professionals with the forms? What is the experience of patients and family members? The ultimate goal would be policy recommendations for improvements in the forms themselves and in associated laws, along with recommendations to improve how the forms can be used - or whether some entirely different approach might be needed. Stanford Hospital and Clinics will be the client in researching and addressing the above questions. Elements used in grading: Written Assignments, Final Paper. -- NOTE: Students may not count more than a combined total of eight units of directed research projects and policy lab practica toward graduation unless the additional counted units are approved in advance by the Petitions Committee. Such approval will be granted only for good cause shown. Even in the case of a successful petition for additional units, a student cannot receive a letter grade for more than eight units of independent research (Policy Lab practicum, Directed Research, Directed Writing, Senior Thesis, and/or Research Track). Any units taken in excess of eight will be graded on a mandatory pass basis. For detailed information, see "Directed Research/Policy Labs" in the SLS Student Handbook. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit

LAW 805L: Policy Practicum: Native Brief Project

Students will participate in the Native Amicus Brief Project, http://nativebrief.sites.yale.edu/, a national non-profit that tracks Indian law cases in the lower federal courts and, where warranted, students will research and assist in drafting amicus briefs. Because federal Indian law is complex and often requires knowledge of tribes' unique histories and cultures, amicus briefs can play a crucial role in fostering greater understanding and awareness of Indian law issues. Using Bloomberg Law, students will identify cases involving Indian law issues and summarize them for upload into the Tracking Wiki. Key current issues in federal Indian law cases include questions of federal power and tribal jurisdiction, race and equal protection, gaming, and environmental law and policy. Students will also have the opportunity to conduct research for future amicus briefs in Indian law cases, and may also have opportunities to assist in brief drafting. Extended research opportunities are possible for students enrolled in Section 02, which meets the Research requirement. After the term begins, students accepted into the course can transfer from Section 01 (2 units) into Section 02 (3 units), which meets the Research requirement, with consent of the instructor. Elements used in grading: Class participation, individual meetings with professor; written research memoranda. -- NOTE: Students may not count more than a combined total of eight units of directed research projects and policy lab practica toward graduation unless the additional counted units are approved in advance by the Petitions Committee. Such approval will be granted only for good cause shown. Even in the case of a successful petition for additional units, a student cannot receive a letter grade for more than eight units of independent research (Policy Lab practicum, Directed Research, Directed Writing, Senior Thesis, and/or Research Track). Any units taken in excess of eight will be graded on a mandatory pass basis. For detailed information, see "Directed Research/Policy Labs" in the SLS Student Handbook. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Ablavsky, G. (PI)
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