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11 - 20 of 95 results for: PATHWAYS::* ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

BIOE 376: Startup Garage: Design

A hands-on, project-based course, in which teams identify and work with users, domain experts, and industry participants to identify an unmet customer need, design new products or services that meet that need, and develop business models to support the creation and launch of startup products or services. This course integrates methods from human-centered design, lean startup, and business model planning. Each team will conceive, design, build, and field-test critical aspects of both the product or service and the business model.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4

BIOE 377: Startup Garage: Testing and Launch

STRAMGT 356/ BIOE 376 teams that concluded at the end of fall quarter that their preliminary product or service and business model suggest a path to viability, may continue with STRAMGT 366/ BIOE 377 in winter quarter. Teams develop more elaborate versions of their product/service and business model, perform a series of experiments to test key hypotheses about their product and business model, and prepare and present an investor pitch for a seed round of financing to a panel of seasoned investors and entrepreneurs.
Terms: Win | Units: 4

CEE 265D: Water and Sanitation in Developing Countries (CEE 165D)

Economic, social, political, and technical aspects of sustainable water supply and sanitation service provision in developing countries. Service pricing, alternative institutional structures including privatization, and the role of consumer demand and community participation in the planning process. Environmental and public health considerations, and strategies for serving low-income households. Limited enrollment. Prerequisite: consent of instructor, see jennadavis.stanford.edu for application.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-3
Instructors: Davis, J. (PI)

CHEMENG 482: The Startup Garage: Design (SOMGEN 282)

(Same as STRAMGT 356) The Startup Garage is an experiential lab course that focuses on the design, testing and launch of a new venture. Multidisciplinary student teams work through an iterative process of understanding user needs, creating a point of view statement, ideating and prototyping new product and services and their business models, and communicating the user need, product, service and business models to end-users, partners, and investors. In the autumn quarter, teams will: identify and validate a compelling user need and develop very preliminary prototypes for a new product or service and business models. Students form teams, conduct field work and iterate on the combination of business model -- product -- market. Teams will present their first prototypes (business model - product - market) at the end of the quarter to a panel of entrepreneurs, venture capitalists, angel investors and faculty.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4

CHEMENG 484: The Startup Garage: Testing and Launch (SOMGEN 284)

This is the second quarter of the two-quarter series. In this quarter, student teams expand the field work they started in the fall quarter. They get out of the building to talk to potential customers, partners, distributors, and investors to test and refine their business model, product/service and market. This quarter the teams will be expected to develop and test a minimally viable product, iterate, and focus on validated lessons on: the market opportunity, user need and behavior, user interactions with the product or service, business unit economics, sale and distribution models, partnerships, value proposition, and funding strategies. Teams will interact with customers, partners, distributors, investors and mentors with the end goal of developing and delivering a funding pitch to a panel of entrepreneurs, venture capitalists, angel investors and faculty.
Terms: Win | Units: 4

CHPR 212: Methods for Health Care Delivery Innovation, Implementation and Evaluation (HRP 218, MED 212)

Terms: Win | Units: 2

CHPR 228: Theoretical Foundations and Design of Behavioral Intervention Trials

Focuses on the knowledge and skills, respect and thoughtful practice of designing health promotion interventions that are relevant, theoretically-informed, have broad impacts, and can endure. Provides an in-depth review of intervention approaches for health promotion and disease prevention and covers the leading theories of behavior change. Follows an integrative model to demonstrate similarities and differences between the theoretical approaches, seeking what is useful and worthwhile in each theoretical model rather than looking primarily for what is most easily criticized. Practical in nature with emphasis on the specifics of needs assessments and intervention development and delivery and how these may vary across community settings, with diverse populations, addressing different behaviors, and leveraging traditional and emerging delivery channels. Explores intervention creation, delivery, effectiveness, and sustainability to identify and better understand the resources and other practical considerations necessary to produce, deliver, monitor, and disseminate an intervention with demonstrated effectiveness. Examples drawn from across the behavioral spectrum and include tobacco control, physical activity, healthy diet, stress and distress, as well as consideration of the complexities of extending interventions to target multiple risk behaviors. Students develop a foundational understanding of behavior change theory, rigorous research methods, and creative design strategies to advance the health of individuals and communities.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

CHPR 255: The Responsible Conduct of Research for Clinical and Community Researchers (MED 255C)

Engages clinical researchers in discussions about ethical issues commonly encountered during their clinical research careers and addresses contemporary debates at the interface of biomedical science and society. Graduate students required to take RCR who are or will be conducting clinical research are encouraged to enroll in this version of the course. Prequisite: research experience recommended.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1
Instructors: Stafford, R. (PI)

COMM 274D: Public Affairs Data Journalism II

Learn how to find, create and analyze data to tell news stories with public service impact. Uses relational databases, advanced queries, basic statistics, and mapping to analyze data for storytelling. Assignments may include stories, blog posts, and data visualizations, with at least one in-depth project based on data analysis. Prerequisites: COMM 273D or Journalism M.A. student.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Phillips, C. (PI)

COMPMED 85N: Animal Use in Biomedical Research

Preference to freshmen. How and why animals are used in biomedical science. Addresses human and animal disease entities and how animal research has contributed to the treatment and cure of disease. Significantnportions of this course are devoted to documenting the humane care and treatment of laboratory animals in research, including, but not limited to such topics as laws and ethics, animal behavior, animal modeling, and the animal activist movement. Course topics will also include: What advances have been made as a result of the use of animals in research? Who conducts animal research? Predominant animal species used in biomedical research, facts and myths; the regulation of biomedical research; housing and care of laboratory animals; why new drugs must be tested; animal use in stem cell research, cancer research and genetically engineered mice; career choices in biomedical research.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
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