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1 - 3 of 3 results for: OIT 368

ME 368A: Biodesign Innovation: Needs Finding and Concept Creation (BIOE 374A, MED 272A)

In this two-quarter course series ( BIOE 374A/B, MED 272A/B, ME 368A/B, OIT 384/5), multidisciplinary student teams identify real-world unmet healthcare needs, invent new health technologies to address them, and plan for their implementation into patient care. During the first quarter (winter), students select and characterize an important unmet healthcare problem, validate it through primary interviews and secondary research, and then brainstorm and screen initial technology-based solutions. In the second quarter (spring), teams select a lead solution and move it toward the market through prototyping, technical re-risking, strategies to address healthcare-specific requirements (regulation, reimbursement), and business planning. Final presentations in winter and spring are made to a panel of prominent health technology experts and/or investors. Class sessions include faculty-led instruction and case studies, coaching sessions by industry specialists, expert guest lecturers, and interactive team meetings. Enrollment is by application only, and students are required to participate in both quarters of the course. Visit http://biodesign.stanford.edu/programs/stanford-courses/biodesign-innovation.html to access the application, examples of past projects, and student testimonials. More information about Stanford Biodesign, which has led to the creation of 50 venture-backed healthcare companies and has helped hundreds of student launch health technology careers, can be found at http://biodesign.stanford.edu/.
Terms: Win | Units: 4

ME 368B: Biodesign Innovation: Concept Development and Implementation (BIOE 374B, MED 272B)

In this two-quarter course series ( BIOE 374A/B, MED 272A/B, ME 368A/B, OIT 384/5), multidisciplinary student teams identify real-world unmet healthcare needs, invent new health technologies to address them, and plan for their implementation into patient care. During the first quarter (winter), students select and characterize an important unmet healthcare problem, validate it through primary interviews and secondary research, and then brainstorm and screen initial technology-based solutions. In the second quarter (spring), teams select a lead solution and move it toward the market through prototyping, technical re-risking, strategies to address healthcare-specific requirements (regulation, reimbursement), and business planning. Final presentations in winter and spring are made to a panel of prominent health technology experts and/or investors. Class sessions include faculty-led instruction and case studies, coaching sessions by industry specialists, expert guest lecturers, and interactive team meetings. Enrollment is by application only, and students are required to participate in both quarters of the course. Visit http://biodesign.stanford.edu/programs/stanford-courses/biodesign-innovation.html to access the application, examples of past projects, and student testimonials. More information about Stanford Biodesign, which has led to the creation of 50 venture-backed healthcare companies and has helped hundreds of student launch health technology careers, can be found at http://biodesign.stanford.edu/.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4

OIT 368: Design for Disruption

"Disruption" is a widely used and frequently misunderstood term. Understanding it better can help you think about your organization or team¿s strategy whether you're trying to disrupt, avoid being disrupted, or simply scanning the horizon for new trends in your industry.This course takes a unique view on disruption by combining disruption theory research, innovation strategy, and the ways that business practitioners and Silicon Valley entrepreneurs have redefined disruption over the last decade. We'll bring these perspectives together in a framework for gauging the disruptive potential of an innovation - that is, how likely the innovation is to fundamentally change the structure of an industry. You'll learn the critical roles that customers, value chains, and technologies play in driving such changes.While the popular press tends to focus on disruption in the technology sector, you'll see that it happens in every industry and sector, it can be done by mature, established companies, and it's not just for technology startups. We'll study disruption in a wide variety of industries, like nonprofits, pharmaceutical companies, food processing companies, airline manufacturers (Boeing) and chemical manufacturers. And of course, we'll talk about Uber, Airbnb, Microsoft, and Amazon too.In some cases we'll take a very futuristic view of disruption in which you will see how a very recent discovery can lead to fascinating possibilities for disruption that may be 10-20 years down the line. Distinguishing between developments that will last and drive changes vs. developments that are temporary fads is something the frameworks in this course will help you unpack.You'll also have the opportunity to investigate how established firms (we call them incumbents) can avoid the perils of being disrupted and left behind. You will identify the qualities of incumbents that have faced disruption successfully, and the missteps of those that have not.Finally, you will work on a capstone mini project in which you will apply the course frameworks to develop a disruption hypothesis for the industry of your choosing. This could be the industry you worked in the past or an industry you plan to work in the future, an industry that you may want to disrupt, or simply an industry that's compelling to you. Topics covered include:The Disruption Framework and the Three Pillars of DisruptionDisruption via new entrantsIncumbent self-disruption, and when incumbents miss the disruptionNonprofit vs. for-profit disruptionThe Five Forces FrameworkDeveloping and testing a new disruption hypothesis using design thinking and lean startupCases and examples we¿ll examine include:Impossible FoodsHIV treatment pharmaceuticalsWarby ParkerStarbucksAmazon Web ServicesFundboxBoeingDow CorningMicrosoftCalifornia Health Care FoundationKodakFastbrick RoboticsPelotonPokémon GoKodakUberAirbnb
Terms: Win | Units: 3
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