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1 - 3 of 3 results for: OIT 368

ME 368A: Biodesign Innovation: Needs Finding and Concept Creation (BIOE 374A, MED 272A)

In this two-quarter course series ( BIOE 374A/B, MED 272A/B, ME 368A/B, OIT 384/5), multidisciplinary student teams identify real-world unmet healthcare needs, invent new health technologies to address them, and plan for their implementation into patient care. During the first quarter (winter), students select and characterize an important unmet healthcare problem, validate it through primary interviews and secondary research, and then brainstorm and screen initial technology-based solutions. In the second quarter (spring), teams select a lead solution and move it toward the market through prototyping, technical re-risking, strategies to address healthcare-specific requirements (regulation, reimbursement), and business planning. Final presentations in winter and spring are made to a panel of prominent health technology experts and/or investors. Class sessions include faculty-led instruction and case studies, coaching sessions by industry specialists, expert guest lecturers, and interactive team meetings. Enrollment is by application only, and students are expected to participate in both quarters of the course. Visit http://biodesign.stanford.edu/programs/stanford-courses/biodesign-innovation.html to access the application, examples of past projects, and student testimonials. More information about Stanford Biodesign, which has led to the creation of nearly 50 venture-backed healthcare companies and has helped hundreds of student launch health technology careers, can be found at http://biodesign.stanford.edu/.
Terms: Win | Units: 4

ME 368B: Biodesign Innovation: Concept Development and Implementation (BIOE 374B, MED 272B)

In this two-quarter course series ( BIOE 374A/B, MED 272A/B, ME 368A/B, OIT 384/5), multidisciplinary student teams identify real-world unmet healthcare needs, invent new health technologies to address them, and plan for their implementation into patient care. During the first quarter (winter), students select and characterize an important unmet healthcare problem, validate it through primary interviews and secondary research, and then brainstorm and screen initial technology-based solutions. In the second quarter (spring), teams select a lead solution and move it toward the market through prototyping, technical re-risking, strategies to address healthcare-specific requirements (regulation, reimbursement), and business planning. Final presentations in winter and spring are made to a panel of prominent health technology experts and/or investors. Class sessions include faculty-led instruction and case studies, coaching sessions by industry specialists, expert guest lecturers, and interactive team meetings. Enrollment is by application only, and students are expected to participate in both quarters of the course. Visit http://biodesign.stanford.edu/programs/stanford-courses/biodesign-innovation.html to access the application, examples of past projects, and student testimonials. More information about Stanford Biodesign, which has led to the creation of nearly 50 venture-backed healthcare companies and has helped hundreds of student launch health technology careers, can be found at http://biodesign.stanford.edu/.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4

OIT 368: Innovation Strategy and Operations

In this course, we will take an operations view of innovation. The course relies on three principles, 1) innovation requires strong processes that can both guide the development and execution of a firm's innovation strategy; 2) strong processes can guide innovation through the evolutionary stages of a company: growth, scale, change, and stable; and 3) strong processes are ambidextrous - they can generate both incremental and disruptive innovations, and the talented operations leader can guide the processes by adapting their area of focus. The perspective in the course will be that of a very senior Operations Manager such as the Chief Operations Officer and students will be expected to develop and test innovation strategies using a combination of qualitative and quantitative approaches. Specific Topics: Lean mindset as a framework for innovation process, Lean processes, Design thinking and Lean startups. Formulating an innovation strategy with an eye towards execution and implementation, Leveraging the value chain eco-system to accelerate and support innovations, Developing operation processes for scaling innovations, and Design of business model to create values from innovations. The course will utilize a series of workshops on lean and design thinking to learn the underlying innovation processes, and case studies and projects to apply the concepts. Case studies will involve a multi session deep dive into specific industries and issues in a variety of industries and sectors. For example we will explore Boeing's innovation strategy and processes through the development and launch of the Boeing 787, design sprints to test different value chain innovations for the production and assembly of the 787, how the potential development of battery powered airplanes may disrupt Boeing's business model, take a deep dive into 3d printing and investigate how this technology can disrupt different industry verticals, and we will consider Crocs on how they adapt their value chain processes to support the growth of their initial innovation, as well as how that can then be leveraged for further innovations. A project leveraging design thinking and lean startup will focus on developing a specific disruption hypothesis for an established organization.
Terms: Win | Units: 3
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