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21 - 30 of 37 results for: OB ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

OB 581: Negotiations

This course is designed to improve students' skills in all phases of a negotiation: understanding prescriptive and descriptive negotiation theory as it applies to dyadic and multiparty negotiations, to buyer-seller transactions and the resolution of disputes, to the development of negotiation strategy and to the management of integrative and distributive aspects of the negotiation process. The course is based on a series of simulated negotiations in a variety of contexts including one-on-one, multi-party, and team negotiations. When playing a role in a simulated conflict, you will be free to try out tactics that might feel uncomfortable in a real one. You will get feedback from your classmates about how you come across. You will have an opportunity to reflect on your experience in your negotiation paper. In sum, you can use this course to expand your repertoire of conflict management and negotiation skills, to hone your skills, and to become more adept in choosing when to apply each skill. This course represents a shorter, more intense version of OB 381-Conflict Management and Negotiations. Students should not take both courses, as there is considerable overlap in course content. Attendance and participation in the negotiation exercises is mandatory.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 2

OB 612: Careers and Organizations

The careers of individuals are shaped by their movement within and between organizations, whether those be established employers or entrepreneurial ventures. Conversely, organizations of all sizes are shaped by the flows of individuals through them as individuals construct careers by pursuing different opportunities. This course will examine sociological and economic theory and research on this mutually constitutive relationship. Possible topics include inequality and attainment processes, internal labor markets, mobility dynamics, individual and organizational learning, ecological influences, gender and racial segregation, discrimination, and entrepreneurship as a career process.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: Sorensen, J. (PI)

OB 626: Strategy and Organizations

Why are some organizations more competitive than others? This is the defining questions of the interdisciplinary research field known as "strategic management." In this PhD seminar, we will survey the field of strategic management as seen from the perspective of "macro" organizational behavior. The course takes a broad view of the field of strategic management, reflecting the diversity of perspectives that is seen in this field worldwide. Across this diversity, however, it is possible to identify four distinct theoretical approaches by noting the mechanisms that researchers think are generating outcomes. The course is structured around these four theoretical approaches, and one of the main objectives of the course is to help you identify, critique, and improve these theoretical approaches. Most work in strategic management pays less attention to particular theoretical perspectives, and is organized more by the topic - the phenomenon being studied - such as market exit, growth, performa more »
Why are some organizations more competitive than others? This is the defining questions of the interdisciplinary research field known as "strategic management." In this PhD seminar, we will survey the field of strategic management as seen from the perspective of "macro" organizational behavior. The course takes a broad view of the field of strategic management, reflecting the diversity of perspectives that is seen in this field worldwide. Across this diversity, however, it is possible to identify four distinct theoretical approaches by noting the mechanisms that researchers think are generating outcomes. The course is structured around these four theoretical approaches, and one of the main objectives of the course is to help you identify, critique, and improve these theoretical approaches. Most work in strategic management pays less attention to particular theoretical perspectives, and is organized more by the topic - the phenomenon being studied - such as market exit, growth, performance, mergers and acquisitions, innovation, and the like. I have catalogued the research in strategic management both according to theoretical perspective and topic, and the skeleton of that structure can be seen in this syllabus. I encourage you to use a similar structure as you try to make sense out of the strategy field.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: Barnett, W. (PI)

OB 630: Social Norms

This course covers research and theory on the origins and function of social norms. Topics include the estimation of public opinion, the function of norms as ideals and standards of judgment, and the impact of norms on collective and individual behavior. In addition to acquainting students with the various forms and functions of social norms the course will provide students with experience in identifying and formulating tractable research questions.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: Miller, D. (PI)

OB 632: Social Movements

Social movement activists frequently target organizations (e.g., corporations, universities) in order to bring about political and social change. Because most organizations are not democracies, movements must find ways to penetrate their closed boundaries if they are to have an influence inside organizations. At the same time, social movements create organizational structures that help them carry out their goals, reproduce their missions and tactics, and effectively generate collective action. The purpose of this course is to examine the complex relationship between social movements and organizations. In order to understand the empirical link between movements and organizations, we will rely on social movement and organizational theory. Like the phenomena they seek to explain, these theories are strongly intertwined. In this course, we will cover topics related to how movements use organizations to propel change, and topics related to how movements help generate social change by targeting organizations. We will also evaluate the theoretical developments at the nexus of these two literatures, identifying the major innovations as well as looking for new research opportunities.
Terms: Win | Units: 3
Instructors: Soule, S. (PI)

OB 654: Organizational Behavior Pro Seminar

This pro-seminar is primarily for OB-macro PhD students who are developing dissertation ideas. The focus is on the theoretical argument underpinning the dissertation research. Students will regularly present and comment upon one another's ideas. Students can and are encouraged to take the pro-seminar multiple times.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Sorensen, J. (PI)

OB 660: Topics in Organizational Behavior: Individual Processes

This course will focus on psychological processes that occur within individuals that cannot be seen but whose existence can be inferred on the basis of people's behavior. Such processes, referred to as individual processes, include personality, emotions, perception, and learning. This course aims to introduce students to both theoretical and applied background on individual processes, with a special emphasis on their assessment, importance for person-job fit, and career planning. The course will include a hands-on section aimed at practicing test/survey development and delivering it in the online environment.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: Kosinski, M. (PI)

OB 662: Topics in Organizational Behavior: Intergroup Processes

The primary objective of this course is to provide an overview and organizing framework of the micro-organizational behavior literature. This entails reading many foundational pieces that will cover the classic areas of research in the field. We will also read more cutting-edge papers that reanalyze and reframe many of the classic variables of micro-OB, trying to alter the dominant perspective, bring in new theory, and integrate conflicting approaches.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: Berg, J. (PI)

OB 670: Designing Social Research

This is a course in the design of social research, with a particular emphasis on research field (i.e., non-laboratory) settings. As such, the course is a forum for discussing and developing an understanding of the different strategies social theorists employ to explain social processes, develop theories, and make these theories as believable as possible. In general, these issues will be discussed in the context of sociological research on organizations, but this will not be the exclusive focus of the course. A range of topics will be covered, for example: formulating and motivating research questions; varieties of explanation; experimental and quasi-experimental methods, including natural experiments; counterfactual models; conceptualization and measurement; sampling and case selection; qualitative and quantitative approaches. This course is particularly oriented toward developing an appreciation of the tradeoffs of different approaches. It is well suited to Ph.D. students working on qualifying papers and dissertation proposals.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: Carroll, G. (PI)

OB 672: Organization and Environment

This seminar considers the leading sociological approaches to analyzing relations of organizations and environments, with a special emphasis on dynamics. Attention is given to theoretical formulations, research designs, and results of empirical studies. Prerequisite: Enrollment in a PhD program. Also listed as Sociology 362.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: Rao, H. (PI)
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