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11 - 20 of 37 results for: OB ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

OB 372: High-Performance Leadership

This course asks the question: "What does it take to build high-performance?" The focus is on middle and upper-middle management in contemporary organizations that have complex tasks, exist in a rapidly changing environment, and have highly skilled subordinates. The premise of the course is that traditional methods of management may produce adequate levels of performance but prevent excellence from developing. New approaches to leadership will be presented that are more likely to lead to a truly high-performing system. Time will be spent discussing the components of effective leadership, what a manager can do to build a compelling vision, strong teams, and mutual influence sideways and upwards as well as with direct reports. Also, what members can do to support the leader who wants to initiate such changes. In addition to class, students will meet for 2 1/2 hours each week in a Skill Development Group to apply the course material to their own personal development. (While there is minim more »
This course asks the question: "What does it take to build high-performance?" The focus is on middle and upper-middle management in contemporary organizations that have complex tasks, exist in a rapidly changing environment, and have highly skilled subordinates. The premise of the course is that traditional methods of management may produce adequate levels of performance but prevent excellence from developing. New approaches to leadership will be presented that are more likely to lead to a truly high-performing system. Time will be spent discussing the components of effective leadership, what a manager can do to build a compelling vision, strong teams, and mutual influence sideways and upwards as well as with direct reports. Also, what members can do to support the leader who wants to initiate such changes. In addition to class, students will meet for 2 1/2 hours each week in a Skill Development Group to apply the course material to their own personal development. (While there is minimal overlap in content between OB 372 and OB 374 and these two classes are highly complementary, both require Journals and an evening group. We recommend against taking both classes in the same quarter for workload reasons.) Students will have a choice as to when their SDG will meet. The expectation is full attendance at all SDG meetings. Only one excused class absence. Attendance is required in EIS Simulation and the Consulting Project classes.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4

OB 374: Interpersonal Dynamics

PRE-QUALIFICATION IS REQUIRED BY THE DEADLINE (APPROXIMATELY FIVE WEEKS BEFORE THE QUARTER BEGINS). The focus of this course is to increase one's competencies in building more effective relationships. Learning is primarily through feedback from other group members. This course is very involving and, at times, can be quite emotional. However, this course is not a substitute for therapy; we deal more with inter-personal issues than with intra-personal ones. If you are in therapy, please talk this over with your therapist and get their advice before enrolling in this course. The students are divided into three 12-person T-groups that meet the same evening of the class. It is very important to note that when you decide to take this course, you make an explicit contract to be actively involved. Attendance at the first class is required for all sections. Failure to attend the first class will result in an automatic drop. Some sections of the 2-day/week version of the course also require atte more »
PRE-QUALIFICATION IS REQUIRED BY THE DEADLINE (APPROXIMATELY FIVE WEEKS BEFORE THE QUARTER BEGINS). The focus of this course is to increase one's competencies in building more effective relationships. Learning is primarily through feedback from other group members. This course is very involving and, at times, can be quite emotional. However, this course is not a substitute for therapy; we deal more with inter-personal issues than with intra-personal ones. If you are in therapy, please talk this over with your therapist and get their advice before enrolling in this course. The students are divided into three 12-person T-groups that meet the same evening of the class. It is very important to note that when you decide to take this course, you make an explicit contract to be actively involved. Attendance at the first class is required for all sections. Failure to attend the first class will result in an automatic drop. Some sections of the 2-day/week version of the course also require attendance at the second or third class to remain enrolled. See individual instructor for details. Students who are waitlisted must attend the first meeting of each section they are waitlisted for in order to secure a place in the course should space open up. It is the student's responsibility to notify respective OB 374 faculty of your attendance and wish to fulfilling your waitlist requirement. T-group meetings for all sections will meet for 3 hours in the evening. For 1-day/week sections groups will meet the same evening as class. For 2-day/week sections, please see course details. The class has a weekend retreat the seventh or eighth week (check your specific section) of the course. Because of the highly interactive nature of this course, it is very important that all students attend all sessions. Missing class, class T-group, evening T-group, or any portion of the weekend will negatively influence your grade and may result in a student's grade being dropped one grade level (for each absence). Arriving late on Friday to the weekend will negatively influence your grade level - missing any more of the weekend beyond that will result in a U. Students must pre-qualify before taking this course. Qualification assignments are due approximately five weeks prior to the quarter. Students must prequalify through assignment on Canvas. Go to https://canvas.stanford.edu/enroll/H8WJ8X, then select "Enroll in Course".
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5

OB 377: The Paths to Power

Power and influence processes are ubiquitous and important in organizations, so leaders need to be able both to understand power and to act on that knowledge. This course has three objectives: 1) increasing students' ability to diagnose and analyze power and politics in organizational situations; 2) increase students' skills in exercising power effectively; and 3) helping students come to terms with the inherent dilemmas and choices, and their own ambivalence, involved in developing and exercising influence. Topics covered include: the sources of power, including individual attributes and structural position; dealing with resistance and conflict; obtaining allies and supporters; maintaining power; how and why power is lost; living in the limelight--the price of having power; preparing oneself to obtain power; and the use of language and symbolism in exercising power.The class involves a reasonably large number of written, self-reflective assignments as well as two individual projects ( more »
Power and influence processes are ubiquitous and important in organizations, so leaders need to be able both to understand power and to act on that knowledge. This course has three objectives: 1) increasing students' ability to diagnose and analyze power and politics in organizational situations; 2) increase students' skills in exercising power effectively; and 3) helping students come to terms with the inherent dilemmas and choices, and their own ambivalence, involved in developing and exercising influence. Topics covered include: the sources of power, including individual attributes and structural position; dealing with resistance and conflict; obtaining allies and supporters; maintaining power; how and why power is lost; living in the limelight--the price of having power; preparing oneself to obtain power; and the use of language and symbolism in exercising power.The class involves a reasonably large number of written, self-reflective assignments as well as two individual projects (doing a power diagnosis on an external organization that is important to the person) and a doing-power project (using the class material during the quarter to gain power in some group or organization). The class emphasis is on both learning the conceptual material and also incorporating it into one's own strategies and behaviors.
Terms: Win | Units: 3
Instructors: Pfeffer, J. (PI)

OB 381: Conflict Management and Negotiation

Conflict is unavoidable in every organization. The key question is how it will be handled: will it escalate to dysfunctional levels or will it be effectively managed? Hence, a first aim of the course is to develop your ability to analyze conflicts, to look beneath the surface rhetoric of a conflict, to isolate the important underlying interests, and to determine what sort of agreement (if any) is feasible. We'll analyze which negotiation strategies are effective in different conflicts. We'll also examine psychological and structural factors that create conflict and often pose a barrier to its resolution. But understanding how to analyze a conflict is not enough. To manage conflict effectively, you need a broad repertoire of behavioral skills. Developing these is the second aim of the course. To achieve this, negotiation exercises are used in every session. When playing a role in a simulated conflict, you will be free to try out tactics that might feel uncomfortable in a real one. You will get feedback from your classmates about how you come across. In sum, you can use this course to expand your repertoire of skills, to hone your skills, and to become more adept in choosing when to apply each skill.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: Bendor, J. (PI)

OB 383: Lives of Consequence: How Individuals Create Happy, Meaningful and Successful Lives

This Bass Seminar and Experiential Workshop will examine what it means to live a life of consequence. Using theories and evidence from the latest and best research on happiness, meaning and success, we will collectively develop a conceptual framework for thinking about how you personally can design a happier and more meaningful life for yourself. In addition to building a solid conceptual foundation on which to think about your life, you will have substantial opportunities to work individually and in small groups on a variety of reflective and experiential exercises designed to stimulate your imagination regarding how to create greater happiness and meaning in your own life. These engaging and enjoyable exercises include personal writing and public speaking exercises, as well as out-of-class experiential exercises. The seminar will be very discussion oriented and student participation quite lively. The goal of this seminar and workshop is to change how you think about yourself and your life! THIS WORKSHOP IS AVAILABLE ONLY TO FIRST- AND SECOND- YEAR MBA STUDENTS at the GSB. NO EXCEPTIONS WILL BE PERMITTED AND AUDITING IS NOT PERMITTED.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: Kramer, R. (PI)

OB 388: Leadership in the Entertainment Industry

The entertainment industry is one of the largest and most important industries in the world - both from a business and cultural standpoint. It is characterized by tremendous opportunities and great uncertainties. The industry is undergoing great change as new technologies and expanding markets transform the way entertainment is produced and disseminated throughout the world. For these reasons, this dynamic industry creates opportunities for entrepreneurial students interested in leaving an artistic or creative imprint on the world. This course is designed to help prepare students for careers in the media industries, and to explore leadership within them. The industry is truly an intersection of art and commerce, and the major portion of the course will involve bringing to the class leaders who represent key areas of the entertainment industry, on both the business and creative sides. As with any business, the entertainment industry is driven by the vision of its leaders. These leaders more »
The entertainment industry is one of the largest and most important industries in the world - both from a business and cultural standpoint. It is characterized by tremendous opportunities and great uncertainties. The industry is undergoing great change as new technologies and expanding markets transform the way entertainment is produced and disseminated throughout the world. For these reasons, this dynamic industry creates opportunities for entrepreneurial students interested in leaving an artistic or creative imprint on the world. This course is designed to help prepare students for careers in the media industries, and to explore leadership within them. The industry is truly an intersection of art and commerce, and the major portion of the course will involve bringing to the class leaders who represent key areas of the entertainment industry, on both the business and creative sides. As with any business, the entertainment industry is driven by the vision of its leaders. These leaders make financial and artistic decisions daily, and manage staff and productions with the goal of producing entertainment product meant to be seen as widely as possible, and meant to make a profit. It is hoped that through interaction with these speakers, students will see the potential of strong leadership and how it works to advance entertainment companies and the films and TV programming they produce. Topics to be examined include project development, production, and marketing; emerging technologies and their impact on the industry; the roles of studio, network and gaming executives, directors, film and television producers, writers, actors, agents, and others play in the making and distribution of film and television productions; and the intersection of Silicon Valley and Hollywood. The theory behind this course is that by listening to, and questioning the class speakers, coupled with class research papers, students will emerge with a deeper understanding of the entertainment industry. The class is also intended to give students a view of first-rate leadership in general, and to present what it takes to be a successful, inspiring, and forward-thinking leader in entertainment.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3

OB 513: Beyond Disruption: Entrepreneurial Leadership Within Existing Organizations

Why do large, successful companies often have such difficulty in disrupting themselves (e.g., Kodak, Blockbuster, Borders)? How do you maintain an entrepreneurial edge within an existing enterprise? How do you sustain core businesses while simultaneously adapting to disruptive threats? In this course, students will build the skills to spot threats and opportunities earlier and capture them faster. The course will take a look at some of the most successful ¿creators within corporations¿ and discern why some strategies succeed when others do not. We will explore the framework that some companies have developed to simultaneously compete in their core business while exploring new ones. To do this we will interact with guests from firms like Walmart, Amazon, General Motors, Flex and IBM as well as venture capitalists and entrepreneurs. Our objective is to help students understand in some detail what it takes to help organizations stay ahead of disruptive threats and to avoid problems that often lead companies into decline.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2

OB 518: Leading Through Culture

This course examines organization culture, how and why managers can use culture to maximize results within an organization, and how culture can undermine results. The course begins by situating cultural leadership and management within a culture-shaping framework and the opportunities, obligations and methods for leaders to impact culture. It also focuses on what is different in cultural management and why so many contemporary firms attempt to use it. We analyze the relationship between culture and strategy, seeking alignment between the two. The course also explores different kinds of cultures seen in high performing and low performing organizations, and seeks to understand how cultural content affects behavior and business results. Students will be asked to describe and define the culture of an organization needed for a given business and strategy, and to define the role of executives in shaping culture. The class identifies and analyzes the tools or levers that leaders can use to bu more »
This course examines organization culture, how and why managers can use culture to maximize results within an organization, and how culture can undermine results. The course begins by situating cultural leadership and management within a culture-shaping framework and the opportunities, obligations and methods for leaders to impact culture. It also focuses on what is different in cultural management and why so many contemporary firms attempt to use it. We analyze the relationship between culture and strategy, seeking alignment between the two. The course also explores different kinds of cultures seen in high performing and low performing organizations, and seeks to understand how cultural content affects behavior and business results. Students will be asked to describe and define the culture of an organization needed for a given business and strategy, and to define the role of executives in shaping culture. The class identifies and analyzes the tools or levers that leaders can use to build an effective culture. We will spend a session on each of the following: culture and strategy alignment, architecture for shaping culture, selecting people for cultural alignment, aligning organizational practices, culture and society, cultural inflection points from start-up to scale, cultural aspects of high performance and cultural diagnostics. The course will end with a session on culture issues in merger and acquisition.
Terms: Win | Units: 2
Instructors: Carroll, G. (PI)

OB 527: The Art of Self-Coaching

In 2009 a student who was about to graduate said to me, "Being coached at the GSB helped me grow over the last two years, but after I leave school and no longer have access to these resources, how will I continue to coach myself?"This course is an attempt to help you answer that question. I define self-coaching as the process of guiding our own growth and development, particularly through periods of transition, in both the professional and personal realms. In this course you'll explore a range of practices and disciplines intended to help you build on what you've learned about yourself at the GSB and continue that process after graduation. Classes will consist of a mix of short lectures, exercises, small group discussions, and conversations in pairs.While this is a self-directed process, it's also highly social and interactive. You'll work with in pairs and small groups in every class session, so be prepared to discuss meaningful personal issues with your fellow students.Because every more »
In 2009 a student who was about to graduate said to me, "Being coached at the GSB helped me grow over the last two years, but after I leave school and no longer have access to these resources, how will I continue to coach myself?"This course is an attempt to help you answer that question. I define self-coaching as the process of guiding our own growth and development, particularly through periods of transition, in both the professional and personal realms. In this course you'll explore a range of practices and disciplines intended to help you build on what you've learned about yourself at the GSB and continue that process after graduation. Classes will consist of a mix of short lectures, exercises, small group discussions, and conversations in pairs.While this is a self-directed process, it's also highly social and interactive. You'll work with in pairs and small groups in every class session, so be prepared to discuss meaningful personal issues with your fellow students.Because every class session involves extensive interaction with other students, missing a class would negatively affect other students¿ learning. As a result, your are obligated to attend every class session. One unexcused absence will lower your grade a full level, and more than one unexcused absence will result in a U. For students taking the class Pass/Fail, an unexcused absence may result in a failing grade.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2
Instructors: Batista, E. (PI)

OB 536: Insight to Outcome

Getting from "strategic insight" to "desired outcome" (achieving the right result) continues to be a core challenge for many organizations and leaders. In this course, we develop a framework and approach for the "insight to outcome" sequence, study some of the key levers available to managers, and learn from some common pitfalls. The bulk of the course will be devoted to the practical application of the approach to a number of important business processes, such as merger integration, corporate and business unit transformation, and strategy development. Some class sessions will involve class visits by topical experts in these applications. This course will appeal to students interested in an exploratory course - more of a "how to think about it" course than a "toolkit" course. Grades will be based on class participation and a group project. Class size is limited to 40.
Terms: Win | Units: 2
Instructors: Wurster, T. (PI)
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