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1 - 9 of 9 results for: NATIVEAM

NATIVEAM 115: Introduction to Native American History

This course surveys Native American history beginning with the forced removal of the Cherokee and other tribes from their eastern homelands to the geographic area of what is now the state of Oklahoma. This course will examine key issues including specific cases, i.e. the Marshall trilogy through a historic lens. The course material will cover Native American history to events leading up to the era of the civil rights movement in the twentieth century. The subject of sovereignty and self-determination will be discussed as part of the historic experience of Native Americans through assigned readings, short films, and other media.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

NATIVEAM 121: Discourse of the Colonized: Native American and Indigenous Voices (CSRE 121)

Using the assigned texts covering the protest movements in the 20th century to the texts written from the perspective of the colonized at the end of the 20th century, students will engage in discussions on decolonization. Students will be encouraged to critically explore issues of interest through two short papers and a 15-20 minute presentation on the topic of interest relating to decolonization for Native Americans in one longer paper. Approaching research from an Indigenous perspective will be encouraged throughout.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-AmerCul | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

NATIVEAM 123A: American Indians and the Cinema (CSRE 123A)

Hollywood and the film industry have had a major influence on American society for nearly a century. Initially designed to provide entertainment, the cinema broadened its impact by creating images perceived as real and essentialist. Hollywood's Indians have been the main source of information about who American Indians are and Hollywood has helped shape inaccurate and stereotypical perceptions that continue to exist today. This course looks chronologically at cinematic interpretations and critically examines accurate portrayals of American Indians and of American history.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Anderson, J. (PI)

NATIVEAM 134: Museum Cultures: Material Representation in the Past and Present (AMSTUD 134, ARCHLGY 134, ARCHLGY 234, ARTHIST 284B, CSRE 134, EDUC 214)

Students will open the ¿black box¿ of museums to consider the past and present roles of institutional collections, culminating in a student-curated exhibition. Today, museums assert their relevance as dynamic spaces for debate and learning. Colonialism and restitution, the politics of representation, human/object relationships, and changing frameworks of authority make museum work widely significant and consistently challenging. Through thinking-in-practice, this course reflexively explores ¿museum cultures¿: representations of ¿self¿ and ¿other¿ within museums and institutional cultures of the museum world itself.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Hodge, C. (PI)

NATIVEAM 139: American Indians in Contemporary Society (SOC 139, SOC 239)

(Graduate students register for 239.) The social position of American Indians in contemporary American society, 1890 to the present. The demographic resurgence of American Indians, changes in social and economic status, ethnic identification and political mobilization, and institutions such as tribal governments and the Bureau of Indian Affairs. Recommended: 138 or a course in American history.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Snipp, C. (PI)

NATIVEAM 163: Endangered Languages and Language Revitalization (ANTHRO 163A, ANTHRO 263A, LINGUIST 163A, LINGUIST 263)

Languages around the world are dying at such a rapid rate that the next century could see half of the world's 6800 languages and cultures become extinct unless action is taken now. This course looks at how and why languages die, and what is lost from a culture when that occurs. We will investigate how this trend can be reversed by methods of language documentation and description, the use of innovative technologies, multimodal fieldwork, writing dictionaries and grammars for different audiences, language planning, and data creation, annotation, preservation, and dissemination. We will focus on a number of current programs around the world to revitalize languages. Finally, the course will examine ethical modes of fieldwork within endangered language communities, and the possibilities of successful collaborations and capacity building, focusing especially on Northern California Indian peoples and their languages.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Ogilvie, S. (PI)

NATIVEAM 200W: Directed Reading

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

NATIVEAM 200R: Directed Research

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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