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1 - 10 of 19 results for: NATIVEAM

NATIVEAM 5A: Muwekma House Seminar

Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Biestman, K. (PI)

NATIVEAM 5B: Muwekma House Seminar

Second Quarter of Muwekma House Seminar.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Biestman, K. (PI)

NATIVEAM 16: Native Americans in the 21st Century: Encounters, Identity, and Sovereignty in Contemporary America (ANTHRO 16, ANTHRO 116C, ARCHLGY 16)

What does it mean to be a Native American in the 21st century? Beyond traditional portrayals of military conquests, cultural collapse, and assimilation, the relationships between Native Americans and American society. Focus is on three themes leading to in-class moot court trials: colonial encounters and colonizing discourses; frontiers and boundaries; and sovereignty of self and nation. Topics include gender in native communities, American Indian law, readings by native authors, and Indians in film and popular culture.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Wilcox, M. (PI)

NATIVEAM 39: Long Live Our 4Bil. Year Old Mother: Black Feminist Praxis, Indigenous Resistance, Queer Possibility (AFRICAAM 39, CSRE 39, FEMGEN 39)

How can art facilitate a culture that values women, mothers, transfolks, caregivers, girls? How can black, indigenous, and people of color frameworks help us reckon with oppressive systems that threaten safety and survival for marginalized people and the lands that sustain us? How can these questions reveal the brilliant and inventive forms of survival that precede and transcend harmful systems toward a world of possibility? Each week, this course will call on artists, scholars, and organizers of color who clarify the urgency and interconnection of issues from patriarchal violence to environmental degradation; criminalization to legacies of settler colonialism. These same thinkers will also speak to the imaginative, everyday knowledge and creative healing practices that our forebears have used for millennia to give vision and rise to true transformation.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

NATIVEAM 57A: Cherokee Language Lab

This course is intended for students who have already completed First Year Cherokee and would like to continue their exposure, learning, and understanding of the language.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Biestman, K. (PI)

NATIVEAM 65: Looking out from California: Introduction to North American Prehistoric Archaeology (ANTHRO 65, ARCHLGY 65)

This course is an archaeological/anthropological course that surveys the different indigenous prehistoric culture areas of North America, and the archaeological approaches to its academic and non-academic study. Topics covered in this course include: the peopling of the New World, subsistence strategies, trade, settlement systems, warfare, religion, social inequality, egalitarianism, the origins of agriculture, identity, gender, environmental relations, and colonial empires among many others. These topics will be explored in class using archaeological case studies paired with instructor lectures as a means to bridge the student's regional competency of ancient cultures with in-depth archaeological research methods.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Acebo, N. (PI)

NATIVEAM 103S: Gender in Native American Societies (CSRE 103S, FEMGEN 103S)

Seminar examines the impact of colonialism on gender roles & gender relations in American Indian communities beginning with the 17th century to the present. Topics include demographic changes; social, political & economic transformations associated with biological & spiritual assaults; the dynamism & diversity of native societies. Sources include history, ethnography, biography, autobiography, the novel & film.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Anderson, J. (PI)

NATIVEAM 109B: Native Nation Building (CSRE 109B)

The history of competing tribal and Western economic models, and the legal, political, social, and cultural implications for tribal economic development. Case studies include mineral resource extraction, gaming, and cultural tourism. 21st-century strategies for sustainable economic development and protection of political and cultural sovereignty.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Biestman, K. (PI)

NATIVEAM 111B: Muwekma: Landscape Archaeology and the Narratives of California Natives (ANTHRO 111B, ARCHLGY 111B)

This course explores the unique history of San Francisco Bay Area tribes with particular attention to Muwekma Ohlone- the descendent community associated with the landscape surrounding and including Stanford University. The story of Muwekma provides a window into the history of California Indians from prehistory to Spanish exploration and colonization, the role of Missionaries and the controversial legacy of Junipero Serra, Indigenous rebellions throughout California, citizenship and land title during the 19th century, the historical role of anthropology and archaeology in shaping policy and recognition of Muwekma, and the fight for acknowledgement of Muwekma as a federally recognized tribe. We will visit local sites associated with this history and participate in field surveys of the landscape of Muwekma.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Wilcox, M. (PI)

NATIVEAM 115: Introduction to Native American History

This course incorporates a Native American perspective in the assigned readings and is an introduction to Native American History from contact with Europeans to the present. History, from a Western perspective, is secular and objectively evaluative whereas for most Indigenous peoples, history is a moral endeavor (Walker, Lakota Society 113). A focus in the course is the civil rights era in American history when Native American protest movements were active. Colonization and decolonization, as they historically occurred are an emphasis throughout the course using texts written from the perspective of the colonized at the end of the 20th century in addition to the main text. Students will be encouraged to critically explore issues of interest through two short papers and one longer paper that is summarized in a 15-20 minute presentation on a topic of interest relating to the course.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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