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581 - 590 of 628 results for: Medicine

SOMGEN 206: Global Medical Issues Affecting Women (FEMGEN 206)

This course probes the principal issues affecting women and girls medically around the world. Through interactive discussions, guest lectures, case studies, and academic readings, students become acquainted with the most critical challenges to women¿s health globally, and use selected analytical tools to assess how these may be addressed efficiently, cost-effectively, and sustainably. Topics include women¿s cancer, birth control, infertility, female genital mutilation, midwifery, obstetric fistula, breastfeeding, violence against women, and women's representation in biomedical research. The aim is to cultivate in students a nuanced appreciation of women¿s unique needs, roles, and challenges in the contemporary global health landscape.
Last offered: Autumn 2015

SOMGEN 207: Theories of Change in Global Health

Open to graduate students studying in any discipline whose research work or interest engages global health. Upper-class undergraduates who have completed at least one of the prerequisite courses and who are willing to commit the preparatory time for a graduate level seminar class are welcome. The course undertakes a critical assessment of how different academic disciplines frame global health problems and recommend pathways toward improvements. Focuses on evaluating examples of both success and failure of different theories of change in specific global health implementations. Prerequisites: ECON 118, CEE 265D, HUMBIO 129S or HUMBIO 124C.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4
Instructors: Luby, S. (PI)

SOMGEN 208: Preparation and Practice: Law

Focus is on everyday activities of patent practitioners (patent agents, patent associates, and patent partners) and applying skills learned in medical, biosciences and physical sciences graduate studies to careers in Patent Law. Topics include: applying for positions, the importance of IP protection, licensing, overview of the patent process, drafting applications and litigation. Seminar lead by leaders from Morrison and Foerster.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2

SOMGEN 209: Preparation & Practice: Consulting

This course combines guest lectures with case study and hands-on projects to examine the necessary skills and practical steps necessary to provide businesses with strategic advice and facilitate organizational change. Students will interface with expert practitioners to gain practical insight into the mechanics and practices of the consulting field, and the variety of roles and responsibilities available to them. They will also be exposed to key players and business concepts from myriad industries.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1
Instructors: Eberle, S. (PI)

SOMGEN 210A: EMPOWERING EMERGING SCIENTISTS I

First half of a two-quarter sequence. A practical guide for career development, which includes training on career direction, communication, and the development and leveraging of relationships, all skills that are also easily translatable to many areas of life. Through conversations, self-analysis, and writing exercises, each participant designs a fulfilling and impactful vision for their career and life as a whole. Participants learn a practical, step-by-step process for living a more inspired and productive life.
Last offered: Autumn 2013 | Repeatable for credit

SOMGEN 210B: EMPOWERING EMERGING SCIENTISTS II

Second half of a two-quarter sequence. A practical guide for career development, which includes training on career direction, communication, and the development and leveraging of relationships, all skills that are also easily translatable to many areas of life. Through conversations, self-analysis, and writing exercises, each participant designs a fulfilling and impactful vision for their career and life as a whole. Participants learn a practical, step-by-step process for living a more inspired and productive life. Prerequisite: SOMGEN 210A.
Last offered: Winter 2014 | Repeatable for credit

SOMGEN 211: Preparation and Practice: Science Policy

Through tailored lecture, case study, and a practical final project, academic and professional leaders will help you gain insight into the science policy industry and the skills necessary to succeed within the various positions and levels available within it. This course aims to demystify the U.S. science policy process and teach both how policy affects scientific funding and administration, and how science is used to create and influence the creation of law and policy in the U.S. This course will be taught i two parts. The first part, to be completed prior to the first class outlines the basic structure of the US government, and fundamental issues in US political system, and refresh students who haven't encountered basic civics since high school, this introductory material will cover the structure of the US government, the governance of key agencies, broad concepts of federalism and shared federal and power, the political party system, and a brief and general modern history of the role of science in policy making. The short class online class will acquaint students with the structure of law, regulations and other appropriate policy documents. This online class will be available asynchronously two weeks prior to the live course. A faculty member will moderate this course and give feedback to students on short assignments designed to ensure they understand basic concepts and are prepared for the live class. nThe second part, taught over five days in 3-hour in-class sessions, will review four key concepts: 1) who's who and how they work. The structure and function of the executive branch and its control over science-based agencies, and the legislative oversight and budgeting of these agencies. 2) The policy making process. The policy making process, and the role of science in creating policy. This section will include broad overviews of the legislative process, competing political theory, and risk/assessment/risk management models, as well as discussion of the role of scientists as agency employees and officials, and scientists as experts, interested parties and reviewers. 3) Government funding science. the funding of science by government, including the mechanisms, processes and dominant theories of science funding, as well as the practical and political tensions around science funding, and the reporting and accountability standards to which recipients are subject. 4) Issues, theories and trends in science and policy. The ecology of innovation and policy in the US. Sometimes referred to as the emerging "science of science policy". This final section will review a variety of cross-cutting issues in science policy development, including innovation theory, the role of uncertainty, and a discussion of the government's role as a developer and repository of science data, and other current topics in the relationship between science and government.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Eberle, S. (PI)

SOMGEN 212: Humanities and Arts in Medicine for Clinical Students

Designed for clinical students in their final year of medical school, this clerkship combines classroom sessions, fieldtrips, and workshops in the arts and humanities to facilitate reflection on health, illness, healthcare and medical training. Utilizing disciplines such as film studies, architecture, creative writing, visual and performing arts, medical anthropology, history, literature and ethics, students will explore the culture of medicine, the human condition, and the context of medicine in society. Each student will design, research and present a project which examines and interprets a particular intersection of the arts/humanities and medicine of the student¿s choice.

SOMGEN 213: The Art of Observation: Enhancing Clinical Skills Through Visual Analysis

Offers medical students the opportunity to enhance their observational and descriptive abilities by analyzing works of art in the Stanford museums. Working with the Cantor Arts Center staff and Stanford Art History PhD candidates, students spend time in each session actively looking at and describing works in the gallery. Discussion with medical school faculty follows, providing a clinical correlate to the gallery session. Classes interrogate a different theme of medical observation and clinical practice and includes opportunities for an applied clinical session in the hospital with course-affiliated physicians.
Terms: Win | Units: 1

SOMGEN 214: Conversations in Social Medicine

Draws on disciplines of medical anthropology, medical sociology, medical humanities, philosophy, and ethics to explore the field of social medicine. Focus is on consideration of medicine as both a biological and social event: how assumptions we have about the body and disease are socially constructed, how medicine exists in rituals and structures, and how considering medicine from this perspective can help us be better doctors. Topics include: organ transplantation, knowledge production, mental illness, and language in medicine.
Last offered: Autumn 2015 | Repeatable for credit
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