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551 - 560 of 628 results for: Medicine

PWR 194BR: Topics in Writing & Rhetoric: The Rhetoric of Health and Medicine

This course will aim to give students a foundation in the rhetoric of health and medicine across major stakeholders researchers, government, institutions, doctors, patients, journalists, and a general public obsessed with health and wellness. For example, we will analyze key theories about the relation of institutions, doctors, and patients, from Foucault's Birth of the Clinic to Rita Charon's Narrative Medicine: Honoring the Stories of Illness. We will also investigate how patients make sense of their illnesses through art and memoirs, how doctors are trained in an empathetic bedside manner, and the rhetoric of medical breakthroughs. From this foundation, students will choose an issue to tackle in their own research projects, from the politicization of Planned Parenthood and women's healthcare, to the experience of trans patients seeking care, to the rhetoric of access vs. coverage in current debates about health insurance. Prerequisite: completion of WR-1 & WR-2 req or permission of instructor. For full description, see https://undergrad.stanford.edu/programs/pwr/courses/additional-elective-courses/rhetoric-health-and-medicine
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ER

PWR 194KD: Topics in Writing and Rhetoric: Technology and Human Values

Pining for a job in Google X but a little afraid of what disrupting the next social system will do to humans when all is said and done? Unsure where the real conversation is happening at Stanford about how to think more carefully and thoughtfully about the tech we are being trained to make? Curious to know what underlying common ground might link fuzzies with techies, humanists with engineers, scientists with philosophers? These are some of the issues we¿ll address in this seminar. You will be able to choose your own current topic¿drones, tech and medicine, Big Data, Cloud applications, AI and consciousness, cybersecurity, tech and the law¿for which you will choose readings and write a seminar paper and then co-lead discussion. The class goals are to know better the ethical value of one¿s tech work and research and to be able to express to scientists and non-scientists alike the ways in which this work contributes to the greater human good (beyond strict convenience or short-term profit). Prerequisite: first two levels of the writing requirement or equivalent transfer credit. For topics, see https://undergrad.stanford.edu/programs/pwr/courses/advanced-pwr-courses.
Last offered: Winter 2016 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER

RAD 206: Mixed-Reality in Medicine

Mixed reality uses transparent screens to place virtual objects in the user's field of vision such that they can be aligned to and interact with actual objects, which has tremendous potential for medical applications. This course aims to teach the basics of mixed-reality device technology, and to direct connect engineering students to physicians for real-world applications. Student teams would compete two projects (1) developing new mixed-reality technology and (2) applying mixed-reality to solve real medical challenges.nPrerequisites: (1) Programming competency in a language such as C, C++. or Python. (2) A basic signal processing course such as EE102B (Digital Signal Processing). A medical imaging course, while not required, will be helpful. Please contact the instructors with any questions about prerequisites.

RAD 260: Computational Methods for Biomedical Image Analysis and Interpretation (BIOMEDIN 260)

The latest biological and medical imaging modalities and their applications in research and medicine. Focus is on computational analytic and interpretive approaches to optimize extraction and use of biological and clinical imaging data for diagnostic and therapeutic translational medical applications. Topics include major image databases, fundamental methods in image processing and quantitative extraction of image features, structured recording of image information including semantic features and ontologies, indexing, search and content-based image retrieval. Case studies include linking image data to genomic, phenotypic and clinical data, developing representations of image phenotypes for use in medical decision support and research applications and the role that biomedical imaging informatics plays in new questions in biomedical science. Includes a project. Enrollment for 3 units requires instructor consent. Prerequisites: programming ability at the level of CS 106A, familiarity with statistics, basic biology. Knowledge of Matlab or Python highly recommended.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4

REES 247A: Folklore, Mythology, and Islam in Central Asia (ANTHRO 147A)

Central Asian cults, myths, and beliefs from ancient time to modernity. Life crisis rites, magic ceremonies, songs, tales, narratives, taboos associated with childbirth, marriage, folk medicine, and calendrical transitions. The nature and the place of the shaman in the region. Sources include music from the fieldwork of the instructor and the Kyrgyz epoch Manas. The cultural universe of Central Asian peoples as a symbol of their modern outlook.
Last offered: Autumn 2012

RELIGST 10Q: Literature, Medicine and Empathy (MED 10Q)

In recent years, there has been a groundswell of interest in empathy as a key competency of the emotionally intelligent, and a primary motivator of moral behavior. But what is empathy, exactly? This seminar will seek to find out, exploring the concept through the lens of literature and medicine. nReading novels and exploring the philosophical beginnings of the term empathy, we will learn about the range of ways in which human beings have attempted to know and understand the other. Guided by research studies and our own experience, we will explore the critical question of whether empathy really does lead to altruism. We will consider why it can be so hard for human beings to walk in another's shoes and why we so often fail to do so. Through memoirs of suffering, we will learn about empathy in medicine and about what the latest studies in biology and neuroscience can teach us about how we relate to each other. Lastly, we will explore the dangers and limitations of empathy, reading scholarly circuits and discussing the role of empathy in life and society.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

SBIO 251: Biotechnology in the Natural World (BIOS 251)

Life can be found in some of the strangest and most inhospitable places of Earth. Whether in hot springs, oceanic depths, or dense rainforests, living organisms must be natural specialists to survive. This course explores a selection of strange and ingenious biomolecules that natural organisms have evolved in order to survive. Lectures will cover historical background as well as detailed investigations of the structure and function of selected biomolecules of interest. The majority of each lecture and discussion will focus on the adaptation of those molecules for fundamental and innovative approaches in modern biotechnology, especially in medicine and biophotonics. Key biophysical and biochemical techniques will be discussed as they are encountered within primary literature.
Last offered: Winter 2017

SIMILE 91: Science In the Making an Integrated Learning Environment

SIMILE is a new residentially-based program organized around the question of when something we might call "science" identifiably began, what it became, and what it might become. While we may believe that science, technology and medicine represent some of the powerful tools we have for making a difference in the world, SIMILE challenges students to consider these as dynamic and changing fields of knowledge which must be understood in their historical, cultural and social contexts. Only then can we consider how new ideas, interpretations, technological artifacts and systems respond to societal needs within the limits of what is possible but also, importantly, in light of what might even become plausible.
Last offered: Autumn 2014 | UG Reqs: THINK, WAY-A-II

SIMILE 92: Science in the Making Integrated Learning Environment

SIMILE is a new residentially-based program organized around the question of when something we might call "science" identifiably began, what it became, and what it might become. While we may believe that science, technology and medicine represent some of the powerful tools we have for making a difference in the world, SIMILE challenges students to consider these as dynamic and changing fields of knowledge which must be understood in their historical, cultural and social contexts. Only then can we consider how new ideas, interpretations, technological artifacts and systems respond to societal needs within the limits of what is possible but also, importantly, in light of what might even become plausible.
Last offered: Winter 2015 | UG Reqs: THINK, WAY-A-II

SIMILE 93: Science in the Making Integrated Learning Environment

SIMILE is a new residentially-based program organized around the question of when something we might call "science" identifiably began, what it became, and what it might become. While we may believe that science, technology and medicine represent some of the powerful tools we have for making a difference in the world, SIMILE challenges students to consider these as dynamic and changing fields of knowledge which must be understood in their historical, cultural and social contexts. Only then can we consider how new ideas, interpretations, technological artifacts and systems respond to societal needs within the limits of what is possible but also, importantly, in light of what might even become plausible.
Last offered: Spring 2015 | UG Reqs: THINK, WAY-ER, WAY-SI
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