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551 - 560 of 617 results for: Medicine

SBIO 251: Biotechnology in the Natural World (BIOS 251)

Life can be found in some of the strangest and most inhospitable places of Earth. Whether in hot springs, oceanic depths, or dense rainforests, living organisms must be natural specialists to survive. This course explores a selection of strange and ingenious biomolecules that natural organisms have evolved in order to survive. Lectures will cover historical background as well as detailed investigations of the structure and function of selected biomolecules of interest. The majority of each lecture and discussion will focus on the adaptation of those molecules for fundamental and innovative approaches in modern biotechnology, especially in medicine and biophotonics. Key biophysical and biochemical techniques will be discussed as they are encountered within primary literature.
Last offered: Winter 2017

SIMILE 91: Science In the Making an Integrated Learning Environment

SIMILE is a new residentially-based program organized around the question of when something we might call "science" identifiably began, what it became, and what it might become. While we may believe that science, technology and medicine represent some of the powerful tools we have for making a difference in the world, SIMILE challenges students to consider these as dynamic and changing fields of knowledge which must be understood in their historical, cultural and social contexts. Only then can we consider how new ideas, interpretations, technological artifacts and systems respond to societal needs within the limits of what is possible but also, importantly, in light of what might even become plausible.
Last offered: Autumn 2014 | UG Reqs: THINK, WAY-A-II

SIMILE 92: Science in the Making Integrated Learning Environment

SIMILE is a new residentially-based program organized around the question of when something we might call "science" identifiably began, what it became, and what it might become. While we may believe that science, technology and medicine represent some of the powerful tools we have for making a difference in the world, SIMILE challenges students to consider these as dynamic and changing fields of knowledge which must be understood in their historical, cultural and social contexts. Only then can we consider how new ideas, interpretations, technological artifacts and systems respond to societal needs within the limits of what is possible but also, importantly, in light of what might even become plausible.
Last offered: Winter 2015 | UG Reqs: THINK, WAY-A-II

SIMILE 93: Science in the Making Integrated Learning Environment

SIMILE is a new residentially-based program organized around the question of when something we might call "science" identifiably began, what it became, and what it might become. While we may believe that science, technology and medicine represent some of the powerful tools we have for making a difference in the world, SIMILE challenges students to consider these as dynamic and changing fields of knowledge which must be understood in their historical, cultural and social contexts. Only then can we consider how new ideas, interpretations, technological artifacts and systems respond to societal needs within the limits of what is possible but also, importantly, in light of what might even become plausible.
Last offered: Spring 2015 | UG Reqs: THINK, WAY-ER, WAY-SI

SIMILE 95W: Science In the Making an Integrated Learning Environment, Writing Section

SIMILE is a new residentially-based program organized around the question of when something we might call "science" identifiably began, what it became, and what it might become. While we may believe that science, technology and medicine represent some of the powerful tools we have for making a difference in the world, SIMILE challenges students to consider these as dynamic and changing fields of knowledge which must be understood in their historical, cultural and social contexts. Only then can we consider how new ideas, interpretations, technological artifacts and systems respond to societal needs within the limits of what is possible but also, importantly, in light of what might even become plausible.
Last offered: Winter 2015 | UG Reqs: Writing 1

SIS 120Q: Stanford Introductory Seminar: Horse Medicine

SIS 157Q: Stanford Introductory Seminar: Computer Technology in Modern Medicine

SIS 160Q: Stanford Introductory Seminar: Impact of Molecular Biology and Genetics on the Practice of Medicine

SIS 243Q: Stanford Introductory Seminar: Cross-Cultural Issues in Medicine

SIS 250Q: Stanford Introductory Seminar: Sport, Exercise, and Medicine: Exploring the Relationships

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