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511 - 520 of 617 results for: Medicine

PAS 294: PAs in Healthcare IV: Leadership, Advocacy, and Preparation for Practice

The final course in the PAs in Health Care series will provide students with the skills necessary for transition from PA student to practicing PA and will continue to expand on leadership skills. One portion of the course will focus on preparation from the transition to clinical practice, which will include requirements for licensure and certification, medical liability, and ethics. Another thread will consist of lectures on advanced and novel topics in medicine. Additionally, there will be a thread for development of leadership skills and advocacy. The culmination of the Capstone research project will also occur during this course.
| Repeatable 4 times (up to 4 units total)

PE 14: FUNctional Fitness Training

Students will learn how to increase their cardiorespiratory fitness level, boost muscular strength and endurance, and improve flexibility. Class sessions incorporate different modes of activities that focus on core strength and endurance, balance, speed and agility, power, and joint range of motion. A variety of fitness equipment (free weights, weight machines, stability and medicine balls, cardiorespiratory machines, foam roller, TRX, resistance bands, etc.) will be utilized to optimally work the body through multiple movement planes. Through class discussions, assignments, assessments,, and student participation, students will leave with an (1) Understanding of basic components of health-related physical fitness (2) Ability to perform activities of daily life effortlessly and without injuries, and improve their overall health, fitness and well-being and (3) A positive attitude toward wellness and physical activity, which will facilitate a healthy lifestyle.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable 8 times (up to 8 units total)
Instructors: Lillie, T. (PI)

PEDS 130: Pediatrics Journal Club (PEDS 230)

Open to MD, graduate, and undergraduate students. Each session focuses on a current article in pediatric medicine. Discussions led by faculty experts in the area covered that session. Topics may range widely, depending on the available lieterature and students' interests. Students are expected to review the chosen article before class and participate in discussion. Discussion includes methodology and statistical analysis of each study and its relevance to pediatric practice.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit

PEDS 227: Introduction to Pediatric Specialties

The aim of this course is to provide pre-clinical MD students with exposure to the wide variety of medical specialties within pediatrics. Weekly lectures will feature physicians from fields such as Pediatric Cardiology, Pediatric Neurology, Pediatric Infectious Disease, and Pediatric Surgery. Physician speakers will discuss their daily work, why they selected their chosen field, their career path, and their pursuits outside of clinical medicine. The physicians will also provide students with advice and guidance on how to define and successfully pursue their goals.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 2 units total)

PEDS 230: Pediatrics Journal Club (PEDS 130)

Open to MD, graduate, and undergraduate students. Each session focuses on a current article in pediatric medicine. Discussions led by faculty experts in the area covered that session. Topics may range widely, depending on the available lieterature and students' interests. Students are expected to review the chosen article before class and participate in discussion. Discussion includes methodology and statistical analysis of each study and its relevance to pediatric practice.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit

PEDS 246: Developmental Disabilities: From Biology to Policy (HUMBIO 146D)

Fifteen percent of US children have disabilities. While advances in medicine and technology have increased life expectancy for these children, health care delivery, education, and public attitudes have not kept pace. Students in this course will learn the possibilities and limitations of new biomedical treatments of Down syndrome, cerebral palsy, and autism. Students will also evaluate the impact of public policy initiatives, such as the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act and Americans with Disabilities Act on inclusion and participation in society. Prerequisite: HUMBIO 25SI or Human Biology Core or equivalent.
Last offered: Winter 2014

PEDS 251B: Medical Ethics II

The integration of ethical theory with applications of theory or conceptual issues in medicine, health care, and the life and social sciences. Topic varies by year. Possible topics include: ethical issues in stem cell research; death and dying; genetics and ethics; concepts of health and disease; the ethics of international research; and ethical implications of new reproductive technology.
Last offered: Autumn 2016

PEDS 282: Pregnancy, Birth, and Infancy (OBGYN 282)

Comprehensive clinical experience where pre-clinical medical students follow pregnant women receiving care at Stanford hospitals to attend prenatal visits, delivery, and postnatal visits. Continuity clinic format, combined with didactic lessons and discussion seminars. Students are exposed to clinical activities in a meaningful context, bolstering classroom studies in anatomy, physiology, embryology and human development, and emphasizing social, economic, and personal issues related to medicine. This program spans one quarter, covering topics related to pregnancy, labor and delivery and newborn care. Students are expected to be engaged in the clinical experiences throughout the quarter and attend the weekly 2-hour seminar. Prerequisite: pre-clinical medical student or physician assistant student. Course directors: Janelle Aby, MD and Yasser El-Sayed, MD. TAs: Brigit Noon (bnoon@stanford.edu) and Wendy Zhang (wendyz@stanford.edu).
Terms: Spr | Units: 3

PHIL 23K: Feminism Past and Present

"Feminism" is a wide category, encompassing a variety of philosophical positions, but it is also an historical social movement whose meanings and aims have been subject to both change and conflict. This course will explore feminism from a combination of historical, cultural and philosophical perspectives with the overall aim of assessing what "feminism" has meant to various people in the past and what it means today. nnRoughly the first half of the course will focus on major texts (popular and academic) from the 1st-3rd waves of western feminism as well as texts and historical discussion of some non-western feminist movements. The second half will focus on more recent assertions of feminist positions on a few topical issues. Topics will be somewhat flexible based on the interests of the participants and may include reproductive politics; intergenerational, racial, religious and class-based conflicts within feminism; feminism and work; the sex/gender distinction in science and medicine; feminism's relation to other social movements; etc. nnThis course is open to students of all majors, academic levels and viewpoints.
Last offered: Autumn 2015

PHIL 164A: Central Topics in Philosophy of Science: Causation (PHIL 264A)

(Graduate Students register for 264A.) Establishing causes in science, engineering, and medicine versus establishing them in Anglo-American law, considered in the context of Hume and Mill on causation. May be repeated for credit.
| Repeatable for credit
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