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491 - 500 of 617 results for: Medicine

ORTHO 110: Practical Sports Medicine and Orthopaedic Exam (ORTHO 210)

Designed for students considering a career in sports medicine, orthopaedics, physical medicine and rehabilitation, emergency medicine, internal medicine, family practice, or physical therapy. Focus is on diagnosis and treatment of the most common injuries encountered in sports medicine, from head to toe and from acute trauma to chronic overuse. Students gain competence performing an efficient sports medicine exam, developing a differential diagnosis, and a treatment plan on how to safely return athletes back to their sport. Focused physical exam skills are taught for the neck, shoulder, elbow, wrist and hand, low back, hip, knee, leg, ankle and foot. Most sessions consist of anatomy review, case discussion, and hands-on exam practice in small groups. A few sessions cover specific hot topics in sports medicine such as concussion, athletic heart syndrome, and advanced performance techniques. Students enrolling for two units prepare an in-class presentation or short review paper.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 1-2

ORTHO 120: Introduction to Lifestyle Medicine (ORTHO 220)

Lifestyle medicine is an exciting new movement to empower practicing clinicians and aspiring physicians to facilitate behavioral change and promote a culture of health and wellness in patients. Focus is on both concrete, evidence-based findings and tangible, practical tools to readily translate into everyday clinical practice. A series of leading experts and guest lectures guide students through interactive, patient-focused activities in topics including, but not limited to: nutrition, exercise, sleep, motivational interviewing, meditation, and acupuncture. Students enrolling for 2 units use a fitness and lifestyle monitoring wristband and prepare a report on your results.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit

ORTHO 210: Practical Sports Medicine and Orthopaedic Exam (ORTHO 110)

Designed for students considering a career in sports medicine, orthopaedics, physical medicine and rehabilitation, emergency medicine, internal medicine, family practice, or physical therapy. Focus is on diagnosis and treatment of the most common injuries encountered in sports medicine, from head to toe and from acute trauma to chronic overuse. Students gain competence performing an efficient sports medicine exam, developing a differential diagnosis, and a treatment plan on how to safely return athletes back to their sport. Focused physical exam skills are taught for the neck, shoulder, elbow, wrist and hand, low back, hip, knee, leg, ankle and foot. Most sessions consist of anatomy review, case discussion, and hands-on exam practice in small groups. A few sessions cover specific hot topics in sports medicine such as concussion, athletic heart syndrome, and advanced performance techniques. Students enrolling for two units prepare an in-class presentation or short review paper.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 1-2

ORTHO 220: Introduction to Lifestyle Medicine (ORTHO 120)

Lifestyle medicine is an exciting new movement to empower practicing clinicians and aspiring physicians to facilitate behavioral change and promote a culture of health and wellness in patients. Focus is on both concrete, evidence-based findings and tangible, practical tools to readily translate into everyday clinical practice. A series of leading experts and guest lectures guide students through interactive, patient-focused activities in topics including, but not limited to: nutrition, exercise, sleep, motivational interviewing, meditation, and acupuncture. Students enrolling for 2 units use a fitness and lifestyle monitoring wristband and prepare a report on your results.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit

ORTHO 304A: Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Clerkship

Selective 1. Open to visitors. Typically students spend time at the Palo Alto VA doing both inpatient and outpatient PM&R, and often we can accommodate preferences for exposure to a given VA PM&R service. The polytrauma rehabilitation center is one of five national centers that treat active duty military patients. Students may also request time at the VA¿s dedicated spinal cord injury inpatient service, at outpatient musculoskeletal clinics, at the electromyography clinic and at prosthetics clinic. Often, we can facilitate time on the Stanford inpatient PM&R consultation service or at Santa Clara Valley Medical Center on inpatient and/or outpatient. Sometimes we can arrange for a half day of at the Stanford Redwood City clinics observing interventional spine or sports. For Stanford students, this rotation may fulfill your selective 1 or elective requirements. Please note: Visiting students must obtain approval before applying for this clerkship. To request approval, please contact Erin Nelligan at erin8@stanford.edu. We are often able to accommodate visiting students whose medical school calendars don¿t align with the Stanford calendar, so please let Erin Nelligan know if you wish to rotate off-cycle. Prereq: None. Periods Avail: 1-12, full-time for two or four weeks. 3 students per period. Reporting Instructions: Where: Outpatient Clinic; Time: 8:30 am. Units: 3 or 6. Call Code: 2 (Weekend and overnight call) Director: Theodore Scott, M.D. Other Faculty: L. Huynh, N. Karandikar, R. Klima, E. Kraus, J. Levin, M. Smuck, M. Timmerman, M. Kim. Coord: Erin Nelligan (650) 721-7627, Stanford Medicine Outpatient Center. (SUMC, PAVAMC, SCVMC)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 3-6 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 6 units total)

OSPCPTWN 43: Public and Community Health in Sub-Saharan Africa

Introduction to concept of public health as compared with clinical medicine. Within a public health context, the broad distribution of health problems in sub-Saharan Africa as compared with U.S. and Europe. In light of South Africa's status as a new democracy, changes that have occurred in health legislation, policy, and service arenas in past 16 years. Topics include: sector health care delivery, current distribution of infectious and chronic diseases, and issues related to sexual and reproductive health in South Africa. Site visits to public sector health services and health related NGOs.
Terms: Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-GlobalCom
Instructors: Cooper, D. (PI)

OSPOXFRD 14: Ind Stdy:RAF and Anglo-Amer Air Battles in WWII or Military Med in Iraq and Afghanistan

Independent Study topics related to any of the following: the World War II Battle of Britain; air operations supporting D-day invasion of Normandy; evolution of air campaigns from Korea, Vietnam, Desert Storm, and Kosovo, to the air wars in Afghanistan and Iraq; aerospace medicine contributions to the NASA space program; military medicine in Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom/New Dawn.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-5
Instructors: Winslow, D. (PI)

OSPOXFRD 59: Independent Study on Ethical, Legal, and Policy Issues in the Biosciences and Medicine

Research in depth and write an original research paper on some aspect of an ethical, legal, or policy issue brought up by advances in the biosciences or medicine. Student and instructor will define a topc and the instructor will suggest readings. Applications beyond the United States are encouraged. Possible topics include: revival of extinct species, regulation of genetically modified organisms, the role of neuroimaging in one or more legal systems, regulation of assisted reproduction, physician-assisted dying, health care rationing, control of pharmaceutical pricing, and possible changes to the definition of death. Weekly meetings
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-4
Instructors: Greely, H. (PI)

PAS 201: Foundations of Clinical Medicine

This course explores fundamental concepts of biochemistry, genetics, microbiology, and immunology as applied to clinical medicine in a mostly "flipped classroom" format. This course will help to establish a foundation for understanding the pathophysiology of disease and the targets for therapeutic interventions. Disciple-specific topics include: Biochemistry: thermodynamics, enzyme kinetics, vitamins and cofactors, metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids and nucleotides, and the integration of metaboloic pathways. Genetics: basic principles of inheritance and risk assessment, illustrated with the use of clinical examples from many areas of medicine including prenatal, pediatric, adult and cancer genetics. Microbiology: Basic bacteriology, virology, mycology and parasitology, including pathogenesis and clinical scenarios associated with infectious diseases. Immunology: concepts and applications of adaptive and innate immunity and the role of the immune system in human disease.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4

PAS 212: Principles of Clinical Medicine I

This is the first in a four-course sequence presenting organ-system based physiology, pathology and pathophysiology. Each organ-specific block includes a review of the anatomy and related histology, normal function of that organ system, how the organ system is affected by and responds to disease, and how diseases of that organ system are treated. In PAS 212, the focus us on the structure, function, disease and corresponding therapeutics of several "primary care" topics, particularly the musuloskeletal and dermatologic systems. In addition, basic neurology otorhinolargyngology, and ophthalmology will be covered.
Terms: Win | Units: 10
Instructors: Nelligan, I. (PI)
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