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491 - 500 of 628 results for: Medicine

OIT 344: Design for Service Innovation

Design for service innovation is an experiential course in which students work in multidisciplinary teams to design new services (including but not limited to web services) that will address the needs of an underserved population of users. Through a small number of lectures and guided exercises, but mostly in the context of specific team projects, students will learn to identify the key needs of the target population and to design services that address these needs. Our projects this year will focus on services for young adult survivors of severe childhood diseases. For the first time ever, children who have cystic fibrosis, rheumatoid arthritis, major cardiac repairs, organ transplants, genetic metabolic disorders, and several forms of cancer are surviving. The first wave of these survivors is reaching young adulthood (ages 18-25). Many aspects of the young adult world are not yet user-friendly for them: applying to and then entering college, adherence to required medication and diet, prospects for marriage and parenthood, participation in high school or college sports, driving, drinking, drugs, and more. Our aspiration is to develop services to improve these young adults? options for a fulfilling and satisfying life. The course is open to graduate students from all schools and departments: business (MBA1, MBA2, PhD, Sloan), Medicine (medical students, residents, fellows and postdocs), engineering (MS and PhD), humanities, sociology, psychology, education, and law. Students can find out more about this course at: http://DesignForService.stanford.edu; GSB Winter Elective BBL Jan 10th, 12 noon - 1 pm; D-School Course Exposition Feb 3rd, time TBA. Admission into the course by application only. Applications will be available at http://DesignForService.stanford.edu on Jan 13th. Applications must be submitted by Feb 4th midnight. Students will be notified about acceptance to the course by Feb 7th . Accepted students will need to reserve their slot in the course by completing an online privacy training course. Details about online training will be provide to accepted students. The training is related to the protection of our partners' privacy. Application Deadline: Noon, Feb 4th.
Last offered: Spring 2011

OIT 384: Biodesign Innovation: Needs Finding and Concept Creation

In this two-quarter course series ( OIT 384/5), multidisciplinary student teams from medicine, business, and engineering work together to identify real-world unmet healthcare needs, invent new health technologies to address them, and plan for their development and implementation into patient care. During the first quarter (winter 2018), students select and characterize an important unmet healthcare problem, validate it through primary interviews and secondary research, and then brainstorm and screen initial technology-based solutions. In the second quarter (spring 2018), teams screen their ideas, select a lead solution, and move it toward the market through prototyping, technical re-risking, strategies to address healthcare-specific requirements (regulation, reimbursement), and business planning. Final presentations in winter and spring are made to a panel of prominent health technology industry experts and investors. Class sessions include faculty-led instruction and case studies, coaching sessions by industry specialists, expert guest lecturers, and interactive team meetings. Enrollment is by application only, and students are expected to participate in both quarters of the course. Visit http://biodesign.stanford.edu/programs/stanford-courses/biodesign-innovation.html to access the application, examples of past projects, and student testimonials. More information about Stanford Biodesign, which has led to the creation of more than 40 venture-backed healthcare companies and has helped hundreds of students launch health technology careers, can be found at http://biodesign.stanford.edu/.
Terms: Win | Units: 4

OIT 385: Biodesign Innovation: Concept Development and Implementation

In this two-quarter course series ( OIT 384/5), multidisciplinary student teams from medicine, business, and engineering work together to identify real-world unmet healthcare needs, invent new health technologies to address them, and plan for their development and implementation into patient care. During the first quarter (winter 2018), students select and characterize an important unmet healthcare problem, validate it through primary interviews and secondary research, and then brainstorm and screen initial technology-based solutions. In the second quarter (spring 2018), teams screen their ideas, select a lead solution, and move it toward the market through prototyping, technical re-risking, strategies to address healthcare-specific requirements (regulation, reimbursement), and business planning. Final presentations in winter and spring are made to a panel of prominent health technology industry experts and investors. Class sessions include faculty-led instruction and case studies, coaching sessions by industry specialists, expert guest lecturers, and interactive team meetings. Enrollment is by application only, and students are expected to participate in both quarters of the course. Visit http://biodesign.stanford.edu/programs/stanford-courses/biodesign-innovation.html to access the application, examples of past projects, and student testimonials. More information about Stanford Biodesign, which has led to the creation of more than 40 venture-backed healthcare companies and has helped hundreds of students launch health technology careers, can be found at http://biodesign.stanford.edu/.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4

ORTHO 97Q: Sport, Exercise, and Health: Exploring Sports Medicine

Preference to sophomores. Sports medicine is the practice of clinical medicine at the interface between health and performance, competition and well-being. While sports medicine had its origins in providing care to athletes, medical advances developed in care of athletes exerted a great effect on the nature and quality of care to the broader community. Topics include sports injuries, medical conditions associated with sport and exercise, ethics, coaching, women's issues, fitness and health, and sports science. Case studies.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: Writing 2

ORTHO 110: Practical Sports Medicine and Orthopaedic Exam (ORTHO 210)

Designed for students considering a career in sports medicine, orthopaedics, physical medicine and rehabilitation, emergency medicine, internal medicine, family practice, or physical therapy. Focus is on diagnosis and treatment of the most common injuries encountered in sports medicine, from head to toe and from acute trauma to chronic overuse. Students gain competence performing an efficient sports medicine exam, developing a differential diagnosis, and a treatment plan on how to safely return athletes back to their sport. Focused physical exam skills are taught for the neck, shoulder, elbow, wrist and hand, low back, hip, knee, leg, ankle and foot. Most sessions consist of anatomy review, case discussion, and hands-on exam practice in small groups. A few sessions cover specific hot topics in sports medicine such as concussion, athletic heart syndrome, and advanced performance techniques. Students enrolling for two units prepare an in-class presentation or short review paper.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 1-2

ORTHO 120: Introduction to Lifestyle Medicine (ORTHO 220)

Lifestyle medicine is an exciting new movement to empower practicing clinicians and aspiring physicians to facilitate behavioral change and promote a culture of health and wellness in patients. Focus is on both concrete, evidence-based findings and tangible, practical tools to readily translate into everyday clinical practice. A series of leading experts and guest lectures guide students through interactive, patient-focused activities in topics including, but not limited to: nutrition, exercise, sleep, motivational interviewing, meditation, and acupuncture. Students enrolling for 2 units use a fitness and lifestyle monitoring wristband and prepare a report on your results.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit

ORTHO 210: Practical Sports Medicine and Orthopaedic Exam (ORTHO 110)

Designed for students considering a career in sports medicine, orthopaedics, physical medicine and rehabilitation, emergency medicine, internal medicine, family practice, or physical therapy. Focus is on diagnosis and treatment of the most common injuries encountered in sports medicine, from head to toe and from acute trauma to chronic overuse. Students gain competence performing an efficient sports medicine exam, developing a differential diagnosis, and a treatment plan on how to safely return athletes back to their sport. Focused physical exam skills are taught for the neck, shoulder, elbow, wrist and hand, low back, hip, knee, leg, ankle and foot. Most sessions consist of anatomy review, case discussion, and hands-on exam practice in small groups. A few sessions cover specific hot topics in sports medicine such as concussion, athletic heart syndrome, and advanced performance techniques. Students enrolling for two units prepare an in-class presentation or short review paper.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 1-2

ORTHO 220: Introduction to Lifestyle Medicine (ORTHO 120)

Lifestyle medicine is an exciting new movement to empower practicing clinicians and aspiring physicians to facilitate behavioral change and promote a culture of health and wellness in patients. Focus is on both concrete, evidence-based findings and tangible, practical tools to readily translate into everyday clinical practice. A series of leading experts and guest lectures guide students through interactive, patient-focused activities in topics including, but not limited to: nutrition, exercise, sleep, motivational interviewing, meditation, and acupuncture. Students enrolling for 2 units use a fitness and lifestyle monitoring wristband and prepare a report on your results.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit

ORTHO 304A: Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Clerkship

Selective 1. Open to visitors. Typically students spend time at the Palo Alto VA doing both inpatient and outpatient PM&R, and often we can accommodate preferences for exposure to a given VA PM&R service. The polytrauma rehabilitation center is one of five national centers that treat active duty military patients. Students may also request time at the VA¿s dedicated spinal cord injury inpatient service, at outpatient musculoskeletal clinics, at the electromyography clinic and at prosthetics clinic. Often, we can facilitate time on the Stanford inpatient PM&R consultation service or at Santa Clara Valley Medical Center on inpatient and/or outpatient. Sometimes we can arrange for a half day of at the Stanford Redwood City clinics observing interventional spine or sports. For Stanford students, this rotation may fulfill your selective 1 or elective requirements. Please note: Visiting students must obtain approval before applying for this clerkship. To request approval, please contact Erin Nelligan at erin8@stanford.edu. We are often able to accommodate visiting students whose medical school calendars don¿t align with the Stanford calendar, so please let Erin Nelligan know if you wish to rotate off-cycle. Prereq: None. Periods Avail: 1-12, full-time for two or four weeks. 3 students per period. Reporting Instructions: Where: Outpatient Clinic; Time: 8:30 am. Units: 3 or 6. Call Code: 2 (Weekend and overnight call) Director: Theodore Scott, M.D. Other Faculty: L. Huynh, N. Karandikar, R. Klima, E. Kraus, J. Levin, M. Smuck, M. Timmerman, M. Kim. Coord: Erin Nelligan (650) 721-7627, Stanford Medicine Outpatient Center. (SUMC, PAVAMC, SCVMC)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 3-6 | Repeatable for credit

OSPCPTWN 43: Public and Community Health in Sub-Saharan Africa

Introduction to concept of public health as compared with clinical medicine. Within a public health context, the broad distribution of health problems in sub-Saharan Africa as compared with U.S. and Europe. In light of South Africa's status as a new democracy, changes that have occurred in health legislation, policy, and service arenas in past 16 years. Topics include: sector health care delivery, current distribution of infectious and chronic diseases, and issues related to sexual and reproductive health in South Africa. Site visits to public sector health services and health related NGOs.
Terms: Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-GlobalCom
Instructors: Cooper, D. (PI)
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