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461 - 470 of 628 results for: Medicine

MED 262: Economics of Health Improvement in Developing Countries (ECON 127)

Application of economic paradigms and empirical methods to health improvement in developing countries. Emphasis is on unifying analytic frameworks and evaluation of empirical evidence. How economic views differ from public health, medicine, and epidemiology; analytic paradigms for health and population change; the demand for health; the role of health in international development. Prerequisites: ECON 50 and ECON 102B.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5
Instructors: Alsan, M. (PI)

MED 263: Advanced Decision Science Methods and Modeling in Health (HRP 263)

Advanced methods currently used in published model-based cost-effectiveness analyses in medicine and public health, both theory and technical applications. Topics include: Markov and microsimulation models, model calibration and evaluation, and probabilistic sensitivity analyses. Prerequisites: a course in probability, a course in statistics or biostatistics, a course on cost-effectiveness such as HRP 392, a course in economics, and familiarity with decision modeling software such as TreeAge.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

MED 264: Social Epidemiology

Preference to graduate students with prior coursework in Epidemiology. Focuses on understanding the theory and empirical evidence that shows support for the relationships between social environments and health. Covers four main topics: the historical development of social epidemiology, and a survey of the major theories in social epidemiology; the three main empirical approaches used to generate new knowledge in social epidemiology: traditional observational studies, quasi-experimental studies and experimental approaches; how the constructs of social class, race/ethnicity and gender are used in social epidemiology; new emerging empirical approaches within the field including the application of causal, machine learning and complex systems methods.
Last offered: Winter 2017

MED 265: Advanced Topics in the Economics of Health and Medical Care (HRP 257)

Emphasis is on research studies in health economics. Seminar style course focuses on Health Economics. To be taken with HRP 256. Students will be expected to read and present papers to the group and discuss concepts with faculty. Restricted to second year PhD students in economics & economics-related disciplines.
Last offered: Spring 2017 | Repeatable for credit

MED 266: Literacy: A Fundamental Human Right Toward Health and Advocacy

This is a Community Engaged learning seminar style course that meets once a week for an hour and a half. We will have seminar discussions and readings related to local health literacy issues, and the systemic factors affecting health literacy through collaborative problem-solving processes through course readings and community engagement experiences. Emphasis will be on active learning, with assignments calling for data gathering through interaction with community members to explore and address these issues for more positive health outcomes. The course is open to pre-clinical medical, undergraduate and graduate students. No prerequisites.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit

MED 267: Ideo, Presence & The Human Experience in Medicine

Presence. The Art and Science of Human Connection in Medicine is a new center, founded and lead by Dr. Abraham Verghese ( http://med.stanford.edu/presence.html). This course partners with IDEO ( https://www.ideo.com/) to bring design thinking to address the challenges of diagnostic error in medicine. Dr. Verghese and colleagues will outline the consequences of the lack of presence in the clinical encounter. IDEO's design thinking will be taught by Dr. Jayant Menon, Dr. Farzad Azimpour and Grace Hwang. Class participants will be divided into small groups and designated coaches. Each group will work with the course leadership to define a specific challenge and utilize the design thinking process to create deployable solutions. In class lectures and workshops will be held on campus on Tuesdays from 3.30-5 p.m., and IDEO (Forest Av, Palo Alto) based small group meetings will be held on Thursdays from 5.30-6.20pm. Admission is selective and requires all applicants submit an application before March 1, 2017. Applications can be found at https://goo.gl/forms/7mCI7vf8PbcdVG0m1 nQuestions should emailed to sonoot@stanford.edu
Terms: Spr | Units: 3

MED 268: Tackling Cross-Cultural Health Challenges: Emphasis on the Asian/Pacific Islander Community

Why do certain diseases like hepatitis B affect Asian/Pacific Islanders (APIs) disproportionately? How can public policy advance health equity among ethnic groups? Weekly lectures examine health challenges endemic to the API community, recognizing underreported health issues in a prevalent ethnic demographic. Students will emerge with an understanding of topics including stigmas attached to traditional medicine, prevalent diseases in APIs, API health politics, and cultural/linguistic barriers that health professionals encounter. Guest speakers include professionals from the Ravenswood Family Health Center, the Santa Clara County Public Health Department, Hep B Free, the Stanford School of Medicine, etc. (Light supper served).
Terms: Spr | Units: 1
Instructors: Chang, S. (PI)

MED 271: Global Biodesign: Medical Technology in an International Context (BIOE 371)

This course ( BIOE 371, OIT 587, MED 271) examines the challenges and opportunities of developing and implementing innovative medical technologies to help patients around the world. Faculty and guest speakers discuss the status of the global health technology industry, as well as trends and issues affecting health technology innovation in seven primary geographic regions: Africa, China, Europe, India, Japan, Latin America, and the United States. Students explore key differences between the covered geographies, which range from emerging markets with vast bottom-of-the-pyramid and growing middle class populations, to well-established markets with sophisticated demands and shifting demographics. The course utilizes real-world case studies and class projects to promote engagement and provide a hands-on learning experience. Students work in multidisciplinary teams with real-world companies to develop a plan for bringing an existing product to a new global market. Teams will interact with representatives from their chosen company throughout the quarter, as well as with a faculty mentor, and present their recommendations at the conclusion of spring term.
Last offered: Spring 2016

MED 272A: Biodesign Innovation: Needs Finding and Concept Creation (BIOE 374A, ME 368A)

In this two-quarter course series ( BIOE 374A/B, MED 272A/B, ME 368A/B, OIT 384/5), multidisciplinary student teams identify real-world unmet healthcare needs, invent new health technologies to address them, and plan for their implementation into patient care. During the first quarter (winter 2018), students select and characterize an important unmet healthcare problem, validate it through primary interviews and secondary research, and then brainstorm and screen initial technology-based solutions. In the second quarter (spring 2018), teams select a lead solution and move it toward the market through prototyping, technical re-risking, strategies to address healthcare-specific requirements (regulation, reimbursement), and business planning. Final presentations in winter and spring are made to a panel of prominent health technology experts and/or investors. Class sessions include faculty-led instruction and case studies, coaching sessions by industry specialists, expert guest lecturers, and interactive team meetings. Enrollment is by application only, and students are expected to participate in both quarters of the course. Visit http://biodesign.stanford.edu/programs/stanford-courses/biodesign-innovation.html to access the application, examples of past projects, and student testimonials. More information about Stanford Biodesign, which has led to the creation of more than 40 venture-backed healthcare companies and has helped hundreds of student launch health technology careers, can be found at http://biodesign.stanford.edu/.
Terms: Win | Units: 4

MED 272B: Biodesign Innovation: Concept Development and Implementation (BIOE 374B, ME 368B)

In this two-quarter course series ( BIOE 374A/B, MED 272A/B, ME 368A/B, OIT 384/5), multidisciplinary student teams identify real-world unmet healthcare needs, invent new health technologies to address them, and plan for their implementation into patient care. During the first quarter (winter 2018), students select and characterize an important unmet healthcare problem, validate it through primary interviews and secondary research, and then brainstorm and screen initial technology-based solutions. In the second quarter (spring 2018), teams select a lead solution and move it toward the market through prototyping, technical re-risking, strategies to address healthcare-specific requirements (regulation, reimbursement), and business planning. Final presentations in winter and spring are made to a panel of prominent health technology experts and/or investors. Class sessions include faculty-led instruction and case studies, coaching sessions by industry specialists, expert guest lecturers, and interactive team meetings. Enrollment is by application only, and students are expected to participate in both quarters of the course. Visit http://biodesign.stanford.edu/programs/stanford-courses/biodesign-innovation.html to access the application, examples of past projects, and student testimonials. More information about Stanford Biodesign, which has led to the creation of more than 40 venture-backed healthcare companies and has helped hundreds of student launch health technology careers, can be found at http://biodesign.stanford.edu/.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4
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