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431 - 440 of 628 results for: Medicine

MED 222: The Medical Malpractice System

Focus is on policy and law pertaining to the medical malpractice system in the U.S. Readings include a mix of articles from the medical, law and health policy literatures, as well as some legal cases. Includes problem-based learning and small group work.
Last offered: Spring 2015

MED 223: Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Sciences Seminar

The focus of MED223 is to fine tune critical thinking skills by analyzing original publications and understanding the current complexities of the cardiovascular system. Students will attend a lecture series presented by prominent external speakers on Tuesdays and learn new approaches and technology from Stanford faculty on Thursdays. Assigned reading will be discussed and interpreted in class (1-2 papers per class).
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit

MED 224: Social Entrepreneurship and Innovation Lab (SE Lab) - Global & Planetary Health (HRP 224, PUBLPOL 224)

Social Entrepreneurship and Innovation Lab (SE Lab) - Global & Planetary Health is a new Collaboratory workshop for students/fellows to design/develop innovative social ventures/solutions addressing key challenges in public health and the environment, in support of the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs 2030). SE Lab is open to students/fellows across Stanford and combines design thinking exercises, short lectures & case studies, workshops, small group teamwork, presentations, guest speakers, and faculty, practitioner and peer feedback to support/advance development of your ideas/plans. Join SE Lab with an idea or simply the desire to join a team. Enrollment limited to 50. Instructor's permission required.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: Bloom, G. (PI)

MED 226: Practical Approaches to Global Health Research (HRP 237, IPS 290)

How do you come up with an idea for health research overseas? How do you develop a research question, concept note, and get your project funded? How do you manage personnel in the field, difficult cultural situations, or unexpected problems? How do you create a sampling strategy, select a study design, and ensure ethical conduct with human subjects? This course takes students through the process of health research in under-resourced countries from the development of the initial research question and literature review to securing support and detailed planning for field work. Students progressively develop and receive weekly feedback on a concept note to support a funding proposal addressing a research question of their choosing. Aims at graduate students; undergraduates in their junior or senior year may enroll with instructor consent. This course is restricted to undergraduates unless they have completed 85 units or more.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: Luby, S. (PI)

MED 227: Bedside Ultrasound

For preclinical or clinical medical students, and others with permission. Introduces students to diagnostic ultrasound at the bedside. The normal anatomy of the heart, abdomen, and pelvis pertinent to ultrasound is taught. Some pathology involving these areas is also introduced. As the students' proficiency increases, those electing to can visit the Pacific Free Clinic to be introduced to scanning patients. 1 unit for class attendance only 2 units for class attendance and observation in Stanford Echo Labs.
Last offered: Spring 2017 | Repeatable for credit

MED 228: Physicians and Social Responsibility

Social and political context of the roles of physicians and health professionals in social change; policy, advocacy, and shaping public attitudes. How physicians have influenced governmental policy on nuclear arms proliferation; environmental health concerns; physicians in government; activism through research; the effects of poverty on health; homelessness; and gun violence. Guest speakers from national and international NGOs.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1
Instructors: Laws, A. (PI)

MED 229: Introduction to Global Health

Provides an overview of global health and how it is similar to and different from public health and tropical medicine. Topics include the evolution, economics, politics of global health, major players in global health, and issues of geography, politics, humanitarianism, human rights, science, research, culture and disease.
Last offered: Spring 2017

MED 230SI: Perspectives on Cancer

Cancer consumes the lives of those associated with it: patients and their loved ones, their medical staff, and often the larger community. This course will address the broad impact of cancer from multiple fronts (medical, social, mental, etc.) by providing perspectives beyond the cut-and-dry scientific issue that the disease is often made out to be, enabling students to explore the "human-side" to the disease. In alternating weeks, students will participate in a Socratic seminar based on light reading about relevant topics and personally interact with guest speakers, who may include medical professional, cancer survivors and their loved ones, and activists. This course will meet weeks 2-9.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1

MED 232: Discussions in Global Health

The goal of this interactive series is to encourage students to think broadly about the variety of activities encompassed within global health and the roles of various entities, including NGOs, governments, and healthcare providers, in responding to large-scale health crises, building health systems, and caring for patients in developing countries. Examines challenges in global health such as organizing medical responses to natural disasters, providing healthcare to societies in conflict, and integrating traditional and modern approaches to healing. Case studies are used to critique strategies employed by organizations that work to improve medical care in poor settings.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit

MED 233: Global Health: Beyond Diseases and International Organizations

Provides multidisciplinary trainees insight into over-arching themes of global health. Topics include systemic issues affecting healthcare progress globally, ethical and thoughtful approaches to solving these issues, as well as economics, water sanitation, public health, organizations in global health, human rights, involvement in NGOs, ethics of overseas work, and other non-medical aspects of this subject. This course will cover some of the essentials of patient care while working in the field as well including child health care, malaria, TB, and HIV. Course only open to graduate and MD/MSPA students. Undergraduates are not eligible to enroll.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4
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