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41 - 50 of 628 results for: Medicine

ANTHRO 279A: Health, Illness, and Healing in South Asia (ANTHRO 179A)

This course has three related goals pertinent to medicine and healing in South Asia. The first is to understand the experiences of illness, and therapy in ordinary South Asian communities. How do social and economic inequality, religious commitments, available healing traditions, and community and family contexts shape the experience of illness and healing? The second goal is to think about South Asian medical systems using a broad historical perspective. How had biomedicine been used during the colonial period to manage the health of native populations? What is the legacy of this colonial history on current practices? What happens when South Asian medical traditions (such as Ayurveda) become global? Third, we will explore crucial health problems in South Asia from the perspective of medical anthropology. Possible topics for the third portion of the course include: child birth and maternal health, sex-selection technologies, malnutrition, metabolic diseases, the selling of organs, medical tourism, tuberculosis, HIV, suicide, and schizophrenia.
Last offered: Spring 2013

ANTHRO 282: Medical Anthropology (ANTHRO 82, HUMBIO 176A)

Emphasis is on how health, illness, and healing are understood, experienced, and constructed in social, cultural, and historical contexts. Topics: biopower and body politics, gender and reproductive technologies, illness experiences, medical diversity and social suffering, and the interface between medicine and science.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4
Instructors: Garcia, A. (PI)

ANTHRO 282A: Down and Out: Marginal Lives and Institutional Technologies (ANTHRO 182A)

This course examines the neglect and management of socially marginalized persons including the mentally ill, youth runaways, child wards of the state, drug addicts and prisoners. In this course, we will approach the concept of marginality by investigating the spaces and institutions of decay, neglect and rehabilitation to which unwanted and indigent individuals are relegated. Readings are focused on qualitative research conducted within institutions of health, welfare, and reform. There will be two comparative public mental health sections in this course: one focused on South Asia and the second on Africa. This course is relevant for students interested in medical anthropology, applied anthropology, public health policy, or clinical careers in medicine, psychology, or social work.
Last offered: Winter 2013

ANTHRO 337B: Anthropological Approaches to Health Issues in Contemporary Latin America

The purpose of this course is to examine the anthropological and ethnographic research on emerging health issues and sufferings in Latin America. In particular, the class explores how anthropologists understand and ponder social, economic, political, environmental, spatial processes that shape patterns of health, suffering and death, and the strategies to address them. By analyzing paradigmatic case studies, we will discuss theoretical concepts and social perspectives, as well as ethnographic dilemmas and methods.nnTaking a critical perspective, this class will not only explore the standard topics on Latin American health (hunger, infectious disease, mental health, etc.). We will also focus on emerging sufferings (drug use, epidemics, environmental discomforts and sufferings, etc.). Both standard and emerging topics are examined with respect to the changes in political economy, medical institutions and policy approaches, models of care and caregiving, gender violence, circulation and appropriation of expert knowledge, contamination, migration, spatial segregation, violence, marginalization, abandonment, justice and human rights.nnInterdisciplinary investigation is conducted into most of these health issues, not only in the global health field. They are addressed by the South American Social Medicine and Collective Health approaches. This class will include a description and critical analysis of their theoretical frameworks and core concepts, as well as their relationships to international and local medical anthropological theory and research.
Last offered: Spring 2016

ANTHRO 344: Graphic Medicine

In this course students will study medical cultures through visual communication ranging from x-rays and PET scans to graphic novels. Course will also include literature on visual theory.
Last offered: Autumn 2010

ANTHRO 348: Representing Medicine

The seminar will offer the opportunity to discuss the recent work of a series of 9 scholars known for their innovation in writing and research. The seminar will offer professional networking as well as the opportunity to engage authors in questions of writing, approaches to fieldwork, strategies for career advancement, and brainstorming on how to structure relevant arguments. Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor
Last offered: Spring 2013

ANTHRO 348B: Bodies, Technologies, and Natures in Africa (AFRICAST 249, HISTORY 349)

This interdisciplinary course explores how modern African histories, bodies, and natures have been entangled with technological activities. Viewing Africans as experts and innovators, we consider how technologies have mediated, represented, or performed power in African societies. Topics include infrastructure, extraction, medicine, weapons, communications, sanitation, and more. Themes woven through the course include citizenship, mobility, labor, bricolage, in/formal economies, and technopolitical geographies, among others. Readings draw from history, anthropology, geography, and social/cultural theory.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 4-5
Instructors: Hecht, G. (PI)

ANTHRO 352: Foucault: The Question of Method

Foucault as methodological exemplar for historical and social research. Emphasis is on his historical studies of clinical medicine, prisons, and sexuality, and on applying his methods to empirical studies of topics such as colonialism, race, and liberal governmental rationality.

ASNAMST 185A: Race and Biomedicine (ANTHRO 185A)

Race, identity, culture, biology, and political power in biomedicine. Biological theories of racial ordering, sexuality and the medicalization of group difference. Sources include ethnography, film, and biomedical literature. Topics include colonial history and medicine, the politics of racial categorization in biomedical research, the protection of human subjects and research ethics, immigration health and citizenship, race-based models in health disparities research and policy, and recent developments in human genetic variation research.
Last offered: Autumn 2010

BIO 4N: Peopleomics: The science and ethics of personalized genomic medicine

Exploration of the new field of personalized genomic medicine. Personalized medicine is based on the idea that each person's unique genome sequence can be used to predict risk of acquiring specific diseases, and to make more informed medical choices. The science behind these approaches; where they are heading in the future; and the ethical implications such technology presents. Lectures augmented with hands-on experience in exploring and analyzing a real person's genome.
| UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci
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