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391 - 400 of 617 results for: Medicine

MED 147: Methods in Community Assessment, Evaluation, and Research (CHPR 247, MED 247)

Development of pragmatic skills for design, implementation, and analysis of structured interviews, focus groups, survey questionnaires, and field observations. Topics include: principles of community-based participatory research, including importance of dissemination; strengths and limitations of different study designs; validity and reliability; construction of interview and focus group questions; techniques for moderating focus groups; content analysis of qualitative data; survey questionnaire design; and interpretation of commonly-used statistical analyses.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: Kiernan, M. (PI)

MED 157: Foundations for Community Health Engagement

Open to undergraduate, graduate, and MD students. Examination and exploration of community health principles and their application at the local level. Designed to prepare students to make substantive contributions in a variety of community health settings (e.g. clinics, government agencies, non-profit organization, advocacy groups). Topics include community health assessment; health disparities; health promotion and disease prevention; strategies for working with diverse, low-income, and underserved populations; and principles of ethical and effective community engagement.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

MED 158A: From Foodies to Freegans: Food Popular Topics in the Silicon Valley

This is a discussion-based survey course to introduce the complexities of many "pop topics" in food, such as obesity, sustainability, and local vs. organic food. Course offered over two quarters; second part is MED 158B. The course focuses on Silicon Valley and is taught through a food justice lens. The goal is to provide knowledge and new frameworks for conceptualizing food that transform the way students think about, eat, and purchase food. Furthermore, course content is aligned with Community Engaged Learning (CEL) so that students have the opportunity to collaborate with local partners to complete community-based projects relevant to course topics. Coursework involves class participation, critical reflection, and three papers written for different audiences in the food space.
Last offered: Spring 2017 | Repeatable 5 times (up to 10 units total)

MED 158B: From Foodies to Freegans Practicum

Students work toward making change in the food system. This course matches students with a community partner in the local area who is working to address food issues, broadly defined. There are many ways to make meaningful impact, including working at Second Harvest Food Bank as a Health Ambassador, or to assist with the Healthy Cornerstore initiatives or Garden to Table with the Hispanic Chamber of Commerce. Provides students with the opportunity to apply their academic area of concentration within a community-based context that fits their interests. Med 158A highly recommended but not required as a prerequisite.
Last offered: Spring 2015

MED 159: Oaxacan Health on Both Sides of the Border

Required for students participating in the Community Health in Oaxaca summer program. Introduction to the health literacy and health-seeking behaviors of Oaxacan and other Mexican migrants; the health challenges these groups face. Through discussion and reflection, students prepare for clinical work and community engagement in Oaxaca, while also gaining knowledge and insight to make connections between their experiences in Mexico and their health-related work with Mexican immigrants in the Bay Area. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center). Prerequisite: application and acceptance into the Community Health in Oaxaca Summer Program ( http://och.stanford.edu/oaxaca.html).
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Garcia, G. (PI)

MED 159A: Service-Learning in Migrant Health

Examines the intersection of migration, poverty and health; provides opportunities for engagement directly with community partners working with Bay Area Mexican migrant populations. Weekly knowledge and skills-building sessions covering the process of migration; the demographic characteristics of the local migrant population; the health and socioeconomic status of local migrant populations; current initiatives to improve their quality of life and well-being. Service opportunities include participation in community organizing; health education seminars; and health screening activities. Prerequisite: intermediate/advanced level of Spanish language proficiency.
Last offered: Winter 2012

MED 159B: Service-Learning in Migrant Health

Second quarter of two-quarter series. Examines the intersection of migration, poverty and health; provides opportunities for engagement directly with community partners working with Bay Area Mexican migrant populations. Weekly knowledge and skills-building sessions covering the process of migration; the demographic characteristics of the local migrant population; the health and socioeconomic status of local migrant populations; current initiatives to improve their quality of life and well-being. Service opportunities include participation in community organizing; health education seminars; and health screening activities. Prerequisites: intermediate/advanced level of Spanish language proficiency, MED 159A.
Last offered: Spring 2016

MED 160: Physician Shadowing: Stanford Immersion in Medicine Series (SIMS)

Undergraduates are paired with a physician mentor at Stanford Hospital and Clinics, Lucile Packard Children's Hospital, or the Veteran's Administration Hospital. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Application and acceptance to the SIMS program.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit

MED 161A: Community Health Advocacy

First of a three-quarter course series providing students with knowledge and concrete skills for working with and advocating for underserved populations. Through coursework and placements in community health clinics and social service organizations, students broaden and deepen their understanding of the social and economic determinants of health, how they impact underserved populations, and the various levels at which these challenges can be addressed. Fellows engage in structured activities centered around supporting the mission of placement organizations. Students must apply and be accepted into the program the winter preceding enrollment; application information at och.stanford.edu. Additional prerequisites: Med 157 or equivalent coursework. Spanish language proficiency required for most placements.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-3

MED 161B: Community Health Advocacy

Second of a three-quarter course series that provides students with knowledge and concrete skills for working with and advocating for underserved populations. Through coursework and placements in community health clinics and social service organizations, student will broaden and deepen their understanding of the social and economic determinants of health, how they impact underserved populations, and the various levels at which these challenges can ¿ and should ¿ be addressed. Student will engage in structured activities that center around supporting the mission of their placement organization: direct service with clients and design and implementation of a capacity-building project. Weekly Monday evening classroom meetings serve as a forum for teaching and training, discussion of class readings and placement experiences, project development, and troubleshooting and support. Prerequisites: MED 257A.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-3
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