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161 - 170 of 617 results for: Medicine

EE 169: Introduction to Bioimaging

Bioimaging is important for both clinical medicine, and medical research. This course will provide a introduction to several of the major imaging modalities, using a signal processing perspective. The course will start with an introduction to multi-dimensional Fourier transforms, and image quality metrics. It will then study projection imaging systems (projection X-Ray), backprojection based systems (CT, PET, and SPECT), systems that use beam forming (ultrasound), and systems that use Fourier encoding (MRI). Prerequisites: EE102A, EE102B
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

EE 331: Biophotonics: Light in Medicine and Biology

Current topics and trends in the use of light in medicine and for advanced microscopy. Course begins with a review of relevant optical principles (basic physics required). Key topics include: light-tissue interactions; sensing and spectroscopy; contrast-enhanced imaging; super-resolution and label-free microscopy; medical applications of light for diagnostics, in-vivo imaging, and therapy; nanophotonics and array technologies. Open to non-majors; programming experience (Matlab and/or C) required.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3

EE 369A: Medical Imaging Systems I

Imaging internal structures within the body using high-energy radiation studied from a systems viewpoint. Modalities covered: x-ray, computed tomography, and nuclear medicine. Analysis of existing and proposed systems in terms of resolution, frequency response, detection sensitivity, noise, and potential for improved diagnosis. Prerequisite: EE 261
Last offered: Winter 2017

EE 372: Data Science for High Throughput Sequencing

Extraordinary advances in sequencing technology in the past decade have revolutionized biology and medicine. Many high-throughput sequencing based assays have been designed to make various biological measurements of interest. This course explores the various computational and data science problems that arises from processing, managing and performing predictive analytics on this high throughput sequencing data. Specific problems we will study include genome assembly, haplotype phasing, RNA-Seq assembly, RNA-Seq quantification, single cell RNA-seq analysis, multi-omics analysis,nand genome compression. We attack these problems through a combination of tools from information theory, combinatorial algorithms, machine learning and signal processing. Through this course, the student will also get familiar with various software tools developed for the analysis of real sequencing data. Prerequisites: Basic knowledge of probability at the level of EE 178. Some programming experience.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

EE 402A: Topics in International Technology Management (EASTASN 402A)

Theme for Autumn 2017 is "The Rise of Commercial Space Businesses in Asia." Distinguished guest speakers from industry, governments, and universities present and discuss businesses from Asia related to outer space, including telecommunications, debris removal, payload launch services, space medicine, etc. See syllabus for specific requirements, which may differ from those of other seminars at Stanford.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Dasher, R. (PI)

EMED 110: Basic Cardiac Life Support for Undergraduates

Preference to undergraduates. Teaches one- and two-rescuer adult CPR and management of an obstructed airway using the American CPR model. Does not satisfy MD student BCLS requirement; MD students take Surgery 201.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 2 units total)
Instructors: Lipman, G. (PI)

EMED 111A: Emergency Medical Technician Training (EMED 211A)

Emergency Medical Technicians are trained to provide basic life support and to transport sick and injured patients to the hospital. Topics include patient assessment and management of cardiac, respiratory, neurological and other medical emergencies. Includes both lecture and practical sessions. After completion of the EMED 111 sequence and meeting all class requirements, students can sit for the National Registry EMT cognitive exam and obtain state certification as an EMT. We encourage freshman and sophomores to apply. (ONLY graduate students may enroll for 3 or 4 units with instructor permission). Prerequisites: Application (see http://emt.stanford.edu) and consent of instructor. AHA or Red Cross healthcare provider CPR certification is also required, but can be obtained during fall quarter. A one time course fee of $60 will be assessed to cover required equipment and a uniform shirt.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5

EMED 111B: Emergency Medical Technician Training (EMED 211B)

Continuation of EMED 111A/211A. Topics include ambulance operations, environmental emergencies, and management of trauma including falls, gunshot wounds, orthopedic and blast injuries. Includes both lecture and practical sessions. (ONLY graduate students may enroll for 3 or 4 units with instructor permission, see EMED 211B.) nPrerequisites: EMED 111A/211A and consent of instructor, AHA or RC CPR certification.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5

EMED 111C: Emergency Medical Technician Training (EMED 211C)

Continuation of EMED 111B/211B. Topics include mass casualty incidents, vehicle extrication, pediatric and obstetrical emergencies. There will be one class activity on a Saturday or Sunday during the quarter, specific date will be announced during the first week of class. Includes both lecture and practical sessions. (ONLY graduate students may enroll for 3 or 4 units with instructor permission, see EMED 211C.) Prerequisites: EMED 111A/211A, 111B/211C and consent of instructor, AHA or RC CPR certification.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5

EMED 112A: Advanced Training and Teaching for the EMT **EMT REFRESHER** (EMED 212A)

EMED 112A/212A is a California and NREMT approved EMT refresher course which provides the equivalent of 24 hours of continuing education for recertification. Topics include both medical and traumatic emergencies as well as skills training. Students taking this course also serve as teaching assistants for EMED 111/211, the initial EMT training course. There will be one class activity on a Saturday or Sunday during the quarter, specific date will be announced during the first few weeks of class.nPrerequisites: Completion of an EMT certification course (such as EMED 111A-C), CPR for Healthcare Providers, and consent of instructor. See http://emt.stanford.edu for more details.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-3 | Repeatable for credit
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