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11 - 20 of 617 results for: Medicine

AMSTUD 106: Spectacular Trials: Sex, Race and Violence in Modern American Culture (CSRE 66)

This course will use the phenomenon of the spectacular trial as a framework for exploring the intersections of sex, race, and violence in the formation of modern American culture. Beginning in the late nineteenth century and continuing through the 1990s, we will focus our inquiry on a number of notorious cases, some associated with familiar names¿the ¿Scottsboro Boys,¿ Emmett Till, O.J. Simpson¿others involving once-infamous actors¿like Joan Little and Inez Garcia¿whose ordeals have receded into historical memory, considering a range of questions arising from this thematic nexus. For instance, in what ways are sexual transgressions racialized and gendered? What are the practical and theoretical ramifications of the seemingly inextricable conjunction of sex and violence in legal and popular discourse? And what insights might such spectacles afford when broached as an arena in which sexual meanings, identities, and practices are refracted and ultimately constructed? We will also examine the role of the pertinent professions in the evolution of these events, in particular how the interplay of law, medicine, psychiatry, and forensic science helped define the shifting boundaries of legality, and how print, radio, and television journalism operated not only in sensationalizing, but also in reflecting, modeling, and shaping prevailing attitudes and behaviors. Our study of this vital facet of our ¿society of the spectacle¿ will draw on a series of compelling secondary readings complemented by a diverse array of primary sources¿from contemporaneous pamphlets and newspaper accounts to photographs, letters, trial testimony, and psychological commentary¿that will enable class members to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of different textual genres, experiment with alternative methods of fashioning historical interpretations, and contemplate the ways history might be employed to illuminate the persistent problems of racial bias, reflexive sexualization, and the packaging of trials as mass entertainment in the present day.
Last offered: Winter 2016

AMSTUD 130A: In Sickness and In Health: Medicine and Society in the United States: 1800-Present

Explores the history of medical institutions, ideas and practices in the United States from the early nineteenth century to the present. How are ideas of illness and health historically rooted and socially constructed? How did scientific and medical discoveries lead to the rise of scientific medicine, and how were these innovations adopted within the American cultural landscape? Topics include the transformation of therapeutics and technologies, medicine and the scientific ideal in the U.S., gender and race and medicine, the history of public health, and the professionalization and specialization of American medical practice.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI
Instructors: Horn, M. (PI)

AMSTUD 156H: Women and Medicine in US History: Women as Patients, Healers and Doctors (FEMGEN 156H, HISTORY 156G)

Women's bodies in sickness and health, and encounters with lay and professional healers from the 18th century to the present. Historical consttruction of thought about women's bodies and physical limitations; sexuality; birth control and abortion; childbirth; adulthood; and menopause and aging. Women as healers, including midwives, lay physicians, the medical profession, and nursing.
Last offered: Winter 2017 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

ANES 203: Evaluating New Health Care Ventures: An Everyone Included┬┐ Approach

With ever-growing innovation in healthcare, how do investors evaluate and fund new ventures in one of the most diverse, operationally complex and regulated industries? Health care investment is unique in its dynamic evolution across decades of scientific, business and regulatory development. How might patients, providers, technologists, and investors¿which we define as our Stanford Medicine X Everyone Included¿ team model ¿help identify the best opportunities for the health care investor? This course focuses on how health care investors think and make strategic decisions, incorporating both changing financial metrics and qualitative investment theses. This colloquium will feature guest speakers including senior investment professionals, visionary business leaders and passionate new voices such as patient experts that have traditionally been absent from investment decisions. Students enrolling for 2 units prepare a final paper.
| Repeatable 4 times (up to 8 units total)

ANES 207: Medical Acupuncture

Acupuncture is part of a comprehensive system of traditional Chinese Medicine developed over the past two millennia. This course reviews the history and theoretical basis of acupuncture for the treatment of various diseases as well as for the alleviation of pain. Issues related to the incorporation of acupuncture into the current health care system and the efficacy of acupuncture in treating various diseases are addressed. Includes practical, hands-on sections.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2
Instructors: Golianu, B. (PI)

ANES 208A: Data Science for Digital Health and Precision Medicine

How will digital health, low-cost patient-generated and genomic data enable precision medicine to transform health care? This Everyone Included¿ course from Stanford Medicine X and SHC Clinical Inference will provide an overview of data science principles and showcase real world solutions being created to advance precision medicine through implementation of digital health tools, machine learning and artificial intelligence approaches. This class will feature thought leaders and luminaries who are patients, technologists, providers, researchers and leading innovators from academia and industry. This course is open to undergraduate and graduate students. Lunch will be provided.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable 3 times (up to 6 units total)

ANES 211SI: Themes in the History of Science and Medicine

What exactly is a diagnosis, and what is the history of that term? Why do Institutional Review Boards exist, and what atrocities in human medical experimentation occurred to prompt their creation? What is the role of narrative, social construction, and storytelling in medicine? This course will shed light on the ways physicians and scholars grapple with these and other important questions through a series of lectures from historians and philosophers of science, as well as bioethicists and scholars of narrative medicine. These perspectives on how scientific knowledge emerges and changes over time offer invaluable insights and frameworks for anyone aspiring to practice medicine or contribute to the collective body of scientific knowledge.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1

ANES 212: Machine Learning for Healthcare Quality: Precision Medicine Al Design Lab

This course provides a hands-on introduction to building machine learning systems for healthcare quality analysis and improvement. We explore several unconditional topics, including data representation, data manipulation, data analysis and data visualization. Students will be introduced to these topics during lectures. The course also provides students with a significant opportunity to investigate the application of these ideas to real-world clinical quality improvement challenges. Working with clinical mentors from the Stanford University School of Medicine students will be expected to supplement machine learning theory with a quarter-long project targeting representative clinical quality improvement challenges. Students will be encouraged to think creatively about traditionally hard quality problems and requires to perform group research exposing them to designing practical machine learning systems for healthcare.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 6 units total)

ANTHRO 82: Medical Anthropology (ANTHRO 282, HUMBIO 176A)

Emphasis is on how health, illness, and healing are understood, experienced, and constructed in social, cultural, and historical contexts. Topics: biopower and body politics, gender and reproductive technologies, illness experiences, medical diversity and social suffering, and the interface between medicine and science.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

ANTHRO 82P: The Literature of Psychosis (HUMBIO 162L, PSYC 82, PSYC 282)

One of the great gifts of literature is its ability to give us insight into the internal worlds of others. This is particularly true of that state clinicians call "psychosis." But psychosis is a complex concept. It can be terrifying and devastating for patients and families, and yet shares characteristics with other, less pathological states, such as mysticism and creativity. How then can we begin to make sense of it? In this course, we will examine the first-hand experience of psychosis. We will approach it from multiple perspectives, including clinical descriptions, works of art, and texts by writers ranging from Shakespeare, to the science fiction writer Philip K. Dick, to patients attempting to describe their experience. This class is not only for students thinking of careers in medicine, psychology or anthropology, but also readers and writers interested exploring extraordinary texts. There are no prerequisites necessary; all that is needed is a love of language and a curiosity about the secrets of other minds.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Repeatable 2 times (up to 10 units total)
Instructors: Mason, D. (PI)
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