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81 - 90 of 587 results for: Medicine

CHEM 10: Exploring Research and Problem Solving Across the Sciences

Development and practice of critical problem solving and study skills using wide variety of scientific examples that illustrate the broad yet integrated nature of current research. Student teams will have the opportunity to explore and present on topics revolving around five central issues: energy, climate change, water resources, medicine, and food & nutrition from a chemical perspective. Course offered in August prior to start of fall quarter.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2

CHEM 35: Synthetic and Physical Organic Chemistry

The structure and reactivity of mono- and polyfunctionalized molecules; retrosynthetic analysis and multi-step chemical synthesis. Course will emphasize deductive logic and reasoning skills through conceptual learning. Students gain an appreciation for the profound impact of organic chemistry on humankind in fields ranging from biology and medicine to gastronomy, agriculture, and materials science. A three hour lab section provides hands on experience with modern chemical methods for preparative and analytical chemistry. Prerequisite: Chem 33
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci

CHEM 141: The Chemical Principles of Life I

This is the first course in a two-quarter sequence ( Chem 141/143), which will examine biological science through the lens of chemistry. In this sequence students will gain a qualitative and quantitative understanding of the molecular logic of cellular processes, which include expression and transmission of the genetic code, enzyme kinetics, biosynthesis, energy storage and consumption, membrane transport, and signal transduction. Connections to foundational principles of chemistry will be made through structure-function analyses of biological molecules. Integrated lessons in structural, mechanistic, and physical chemistry will underscore how molecular science and molecular innovation have impacted biology and medicine. Prerequisites: CHEM 35, MATH 21 or equivalent.
Terms: Win | Units: 4

CHEM 143: The Chemical Principles of Life II

This is the second course in a two-quarter sequence ( Chem 141/143), which will continue the discussion of biological science through the lens of chemistry. In this sequence students will gain a qualitative and quantitative understanding of the molecular logic of cellular processes, which include expression and transmission of the genetic code, enzyme kinetics, biosynthesis, energy storage and consumption, membrane transport, and signal transduction. Connections to foundational principles of chemistry will be made through structure-function analyses of biological molecules. Integrated lessons in structural, mechanistic, and physical chemistry will underscore how molecular science and molecular innovation have impacted biology and medicine. Prerequisite: Chem 141.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4

CHEM 459: Frontiers in Interdisciplinary Biosciences (BIO 459, BIOC 459, BIOE 459, CHEMENG 459, PSYCH 459)

Students register through their affiliated department; otherwise register for CHEMENG 459. For specialists and non-specialists. Sponsored by the Stanford BioX Program. Three seminars per quarter address scientific and technical themes related to interdisciplinary approaches in bioengineering, medicine, and the chemical, physical, and biological sciences. Leading investigators from Stanford and the world present breakthroughs and endeavors that cut across core disciplines. Pre-seminars introduce basic concepts and background for non-experts. Registered students attend all pre-seminars; others welcome. See http://biox.stanford.edu/courses/459.html. Recommended: basic mathematics, biology, chemistry, and physics.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit

CHEMENG 10: The Chemical Engineering Profession

Open to all undergraduates. Overview of and careers in chemical engineering; opportunities to develop networks with working professionals. Panel discussions on career paths and post-graduation opportunities available. Areas include biotechnology, electronics, energy, environment, management consulting, nanotechnology, and graduate school in business, law, medicine, and engineering.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1
Instructors: Frank, C. (PI)

CHEMENG 459: Frontiers in Interdisciplinary Biosciences (BIO 459, BIOC 459, BIOE 459, CHEM 459, PSYCH 459)

Students register through their affiliated department; otherwise register for CHEMENG 459. For specialists and non-specialists. Sponsored by the Stanford BioX Program. Three seminars per quarter address scientific and technical themes related to interdisciplinary approaches in bioengineering, medicine, and the chemical, physical, and biological sciences. Leading investigators from Stanford and the world present breakthroughs and endeavors that cut across core disciplines. Pre-seminars introduce basic concepts and background for non-experts. Registered students attend all pre-seminars; others welcome. See http://biox.stanford.edu/courses/459.html. Recommended: basic mathematics, biology, chemistry, and physics.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit

CHPR 206: Meta-research: Appraising Research Findings, Bias, and Meta-analysis (HRP 206, MED 206, STATS 211)

Open to graduate, medical, and undergraduate students. Appraisal of the quality and credibility of research findings; evaluation of sources of bias. Meta-analysis as a quantitative (statistical) method for combining results of independent studies. Examples from medicine, epidemiology, genomics, ecology, social/behavioral sciences, education. Collaborative analyses. Project involving generation of a meta-research project or reworking and evaluation of an existing published meta-analysis. Prerequisite: knowledge of basic statistics.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

CHPR 260: Prevention Across Medical Disciplines: Evidence-based Guidelines

Coordinated seminar series presenting evidence-based health promotion and disease prevention guidelines by research and clinical faculty of multiple divisions of Stanford's Department of Medicine, including cardiovascular medicine, oncology, nephrology, immunology and rheumatology, infectious diseases, endocrinology, gerontology and metabolism, gastroenterology and hepatology, hematology, blood and marrow transplantation, pulmonary and critical care medicine, general medical disciplines (including family medicine). Key prevention issues addressed in primary care and outcomes research, biomedical informatics research and the Stanford Prevention Research Center also presented. Enrollment priority given to CHPR Master's students. CHPR students must enroll for letter grade. Prerequisite: HUMBIO 126/ CHPR 226 or CHPR 201 or consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3

CHPR 291: Assessing the Health Effects of Economic Change

This practicum will involve students as managers of real-time study of the health effects of minimum wage changes in the Bay Area. A long-held economic theory suggests that increased income should have secondary benefits to health, particularly for mental health and adverse health behaviors (e.g., binge drinking). Recent increases in the minimum wage in the Bay Area provide a rare opportunity to test this theory. Students in this course will participate in organizing, executing and directing a community-based study of the health effects of minimum wage increases among local cities, under close guidance and supervision of Stanford faculty in medicine, health economics and sociology. Students will engage in class meetings one hour per week to learn classical and novel methods for the analysis of natural experiments in health policy and economics (e.g., different-in-differences methods, synthetic control analysis), and are expected to participate in directed field-based group projects for several additional hours per week. Priority will be given to students with interest and experience in community-based research on social determinants of health and with bilingual English/Spanish speaking skills. Prerequisites: A course in statistics. Students will be expected to travel off campus to area of Santa Clara and San Mateo counties accessible via Marguerite shuttle, BART/Caltrain or VTA bus. The group work involves recruiting and surveying low-income community members, and requires tenacity to conduct field-based studies.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: Basu, S. (PI)
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