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571 - 580 of 587 results for: Medicine

STEMREM 200: Stem Cell Intensive

Open to first year Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine graduate students or consent of Instructor. Hands-on, five-day immersion to learn basic methods of tissue culture, mouse embryo fibroblast (MEF) preparation, embryonic stem and induced pluripotent stem (ES/iPS) cell culture, differentiation, DNA isolation, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), sequencing, and basic microscopy.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 1

STEMREM 202: Stem Cells and Translational Medicine

For graduate, undergraduate and medical students. Focus is on fundamentals of stem cell biology and regenerative Medicine. Topics include exploration of the well-studied system of hematopoiesis, molecular pathways of pluripotency and tissue-specific stem cells and ends with coverage of aging as related to stem cell dynamics. Features include lectures on the basic science of each topic, followed by clinical applications in order to show the mechanisms and methods to translate findings to therapeutic applications, culminated with construction of a research proposal or business plan in an area of interest, to be further explored in STEMREM 203. Students enrolling for 3 units submit four of seven problem-sets; students enrolling for 4 units submit five of seven problem-sets; students enrolling for 5 units turn in seven of seven problem-sets.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Palmer, T. (PI)

STEMREM 203: Stem Cells Immersion: Applications in Medicine, Business and Law

For graduate and medical students. Provides the clinical, pharmaceutical, biotechnology or business immersion necessary to allow insight into the world of medicine from multiple vantage points, setting the stage for students to translate research successfully beyond the academic sphere and gain the necessary knowledge to move their research proposal/business plan forward (from STEMREM 202). Prerequisites: STEMREM 201A and STEMREM 202.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 3
Instructors: Palmer, T. (PI)

STEMREM 250: Regenerative Medicine Seminar Series

For graduate, medical and undergraduate students. A forum for Stanford researchers to meet, hear about what is going on in Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine at Stanford, and spark collaborations. Topics include all areas of regenerative medicine, broadly defined, ranging from fundamental biological principles and basic science advances to novel applications in biotechnology, stem cell biology, and human disease.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Palmer, T. (PI)

STEMREM 280: Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine Journal Club

For graduate, medical and undergraduate students. Review of current literature in both basic and translational medicine as it relates to stem cell biology and/or regenerative medicine in a seminar format consisting of both faculty and student presentations. Includes discussions led by faculty experts in the area covered for that particular session. Topics may range widely, depending on the available literature and students' interests. Students are expected to review the chosen article before class presentations and participate in discussion. Discussion includes methodology and statistical analysis of each study and its relevance to stem cell biology and/or regenerative medicine.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Palmer, T. (PI)

STEMREM 299: Directed Reading in Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine

Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-18 | Repeatable for credit

STRAMGT 321: Create a New Venture: From Idea to Launch I

This is an integrated lab course in Entrepreneurship designed to teach students the process of creating a new viable venture - from idea to launch. It is a dynamic and interactive course organized around projects undertaken by teams of 3 to 4 registered students from the MSx and MBA programs, together with other graduate students within Stanford who bring expertise of particular relevance to the idea being pursued. This course is designed not only for students with immediate entrepreneurial aspirations, but also for any student considering starting an entrepreneurial venture at some point in his or her career. The course is a two quarter class, with admission to the class by team and idea. In the winter quarter, teams will research, craft, and morph their idea into a viable business concept. In the spring quarter they will further refine their concept and develop a strategy and plan to attract financial, human and other resources. At the end of the spring quarter, teams will present their plan to a panel of experts and potential investors to simulate the funding process. The new course builds on a predecessor course S356 "Evaluating Entrepreneurial Opportunities" and encapsulates new and important research and findings as they relate to the process of new venture creation. The teaching method is primarily learning by doing (LBD) through a structured process and supported by relevant lectures. Learning is further enhanced through meetings with the instructor, coaching by experienced mentors and review by peers. Field research as well as prototype product development are integral to the course. Since admittance to S321/S322 is by team and the quality of their idea, team formation takes place during the autumn quarter. Informal student mixers and seminars will be held to facilitate team formation and idea generation. Each team of 3-4 students should preferably consist of 1 or more MSx students and graduate students from the MBA program or other Schools - Engineering, Medicine, Law, Science, Education - to bring diversity and depth to the team. The application-selection process is described on the S321/S322 website.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

STRAMGT 322: Create a New Venture: From Idea to Launch II

This is an integrated lab course in Entrepreneurship designed to teach students the process of creating a new viable venture - from idea to launch. It is a dynamic and interactive course organized around projects undertaken by teams of 3 to 4 registered students from the MSx and MBA programs, together with other graduate students within Stanford who bring expertise of particular relevance to the idea being pursued. This course is designed not only for students with immediate entrepreneurial aspirations, but also for any student considering starting an entrepreneurial venture at some point in his or her career. The course is a two quarter class, with admission to the class by team and idea. In the winter quarter, teams will research, craft, and morph their idea into a viable business concept. In the spring quarter they will further refine their concept and develop a strategy and plan to attract financial, human and other resources. At the end of the spring quarter, teams will present their plan to a panel of experts and potential investors to simulate the funding process. The new course builds on a predecessor course S356 "Evaluating Entrepreneurial Opportunities" and encapsulates new and important research and findings as they relate to the process of new venture creation. The teaching method is primarily learning by doing (LBD) through a structured process and supported by relevant lectures. Learning is further enhanced through meetings with the instructor, coaching by experienced mentors and review by peers. Field research as well as prototype product development are integral to the course. Since admittance to S321/S322 is by team and the quality of their idea, team formation takes place during the autumn quarter. Informal student mixers and seminars will be held to facilitate team formation and idea generation. Each team of 3-4 students should preferably consist of 1 or more MSx students and graduate students from the MBA program or other Schools - Engineering, Medicine, Law, Science, Education - to bring diversity and depth to the team. The application-selection process is described on the S321/S322 website.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: Rohan, D. (PI)

STRAMGT 511: Protecting Ideas

At the beginning and usually at the heart of every new business is an idea. Around that core idea talent is assembled, technology is developed, investors are attracted, capital is deployed, business models are evolved, and products and services are created and sold. Intellectual Property (IP) such as patents, copyrights, trademarks, and trade secrets are assets that businesses can leverage to obtain competitive advantage, but IP in the hands of third-parties, including competitors, can also be a significant risk. In either case, significant financial outlays and management resources may be involved in obtaining protection, advancing or defending a claim or challenging third party IP. How can different types and combinations of IP be used to create competitive advantages for a business? How may IP risks be mitigated? And how do you optimize alignment between your company's business model and strategy, on the one hand, and its IP model and strategy on the other?nnThis course explores the business impact and implications of the rapidly-changing and often confusing law around how to protect what are very often the most valuable core assets of a business. With the assistance of experienced business executives from markets ranging from biosciences to software to sound engineering, we will review the IP and other tools that can be leveraged to achieve and sustain competitive advantage, and will discuss the legal and business shoals, and the practical contractual, cost and timing issues, that entrepreneurs and other business executives need to be able to navigate. In the course of these discussions, we will survey the Supreme Court's recent decisions in Alice Corp. v. CLS Bank Internat'l, Association for Molecular Pathology v. Myriad Genetics, and Mayo v. Prometheus that over the past few years have reduced the scope of available patent protection in major industries, and will explore their implications for business models and both offensive and defensive strategy in fields such as software development, e-commerce, personalized medicine and molecular diagnostics.nnIt is the objective of this course to help business students to recognize and think critically about how the ability or inability to protect, or the scope of the protection available for, new ideas impacts everything from the funding and viability of a new business to the business model and IP strategy selected to advance it.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2

STS 103Q: Reading and Writing Poetry about Science

Preference to sophomores. Students will study recent poetry inspired by the phenomena and history of the sciences in order to write such poems themselves. These poems bring sensuous human experience to bear on biology, ecology, astronomy, physics, earth science, and medicine, as well as on technological advances and calamities. Poets such as Linda Bierds, Mark Doty, Albert Goldbarth, Sarah Lindsay, W.S. Merwin, Adrienne Rich, Pattiann Rogers, Tracy K. Smith, Arthur Sze, and C. K. Williams. Grounding in poetics, research in individually chosen areas of science, weekly analytical and creative writing. Fulfills the Creative Expression requirement. Enrollment limited to 12.
Last offered: Winter 2016 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE
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