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51 - 60 of 587 results for: Medicine

BIO 274: Human Skeletal Anatomy (ANTHRO 175, ANTHRO 275, BIO 174, HUMBIO 180)

Study of the human skeleton (a. k. a. human osteology), as it bears on other disciplines, including medicine, forensics, archaeology, and paleoanthropology (human evolution). Basic bone biology, anatomy, and development, emphasizing hands-on examination and identification of human skeletal parts, their implications for determining an individual¿s age, sex, geographic origin, and health status, and for the evolutionary history of our species. Three hours of lecture and at least three hours of supervised and independent study in the lab each week.
Terms: Win | Units: 5
Instructors: Klein, R. (PI)

BIO 459: Frontiers in Interdisciplinary Biosciences (BIOC 459, BIOE 459, CHEM 459, CHEMENG 459, PSYCH 459)

Students register through their affiliated department; otherwise register for CHEMENG 459. For specialists and non-specialists. Sponsored by the Stanford BioX Program. Three seminars per quarter address scientific and technical themes related to interdisciplinary approaches in bioengineering, medicine, and the chemical, physical, and biological sciences. Leading investigators from Stanford and the world present breakthroughs and endeavors that cut across core disciplines. Pre-seminars introduce basic concepts and background for non-experts. Registered students attend all pre-seminars; others welcome. See http://biox.stanford.edu/courses/459.html. Recommended: basic mathematics, biology, chemistry, and physics.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit

BIOC 109B: The Human Genome and Disease: Genetic Diversity and Personalized Medicine (BIO 109B)

Continuation of 109A/209A. Genetic drift: the path of human predecessors out of Africa to Europe and then either through Asia to Australia or through northern Russia to Alaska down to the W. Coast of the Americas. Support for this idea through the histocompatibility genes and genetic sequences that predispose people to diseases. Guest lectures from academia and pharmaceutical companies. Prerequisite: Biology or Human Biology core. Students with a major, minor or coterm in Biology: 109A/209A or 109B/209B may count toward degree program but not both.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA

BIOC 200: Applied Biochemistry

Enrollment limited to MD candidates. Fundamental concepts of biochemistry as applied to clinical medicine. Topics include vitamins and cofactors, metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids and nucleotides, and the integration of metabolic pathways. Clinical case studies discussed in small-group, problem-based learning sessions.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2

BIOC 205: Molecular Foundations of Medicine

For medical students. The course emphasizes the impact of molecular biology on medicine. Topics include the structure, replication, recombination, and repair of DNA; gene expression by transcription and translation; biotechnology; and genomics. Medical relevance receives special emphasis in patient presentations and small group discussions of original articles from the medical literature.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4

BIOC 459: Frontiers in Interdisciplinary Biosciences (BIO 459, BIOE 459, CHEM 459, CHEMENG 459, PSYCH 459)

Students register through their affiliated department; otherwise register for CHEMENG 459. For specialists and non-specialists. Sponsored by the Stanford BioX Program. Three seminars per quarter address scientific and technical themes related to interdisciplinary approaches in bioengineering, medicine, and the chemical, physical, and biological sciences. Leading investigators from Stanford and the world present breakthroughs and endeavors that cut across core disciplines. Pre-seminars introduce basic concepts and background for non-experts. Registered students attend all pre-seminars; others welcome. See http://biox.stanford.edu/courses/459.html. Recommended: basic mathematics, biology, chemistry, and physics.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit

BIODS 215: Topics in Biomedical Data Science: Large-scale inference

The recent explosion of data generated in the fields of biology and medicine has led to many analytical challenges and opportunities for understanding human health. This graduate-level course focuses on methodology for large-scale inference from biomedical data. Topics include one-dimensional and multidimensional probability distributions; hypothesis testing and model comparison; statistical modeling; and prediction. This course will place a special emphasis on applications of these approaches to i) human genetic data; ii) hospital in-patient and health questionnaire data, which is increasingly available with the emergence of large precision initiatives like the UK Biobank and Precision Medicine Initiative; and iii) wearable and social network data.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-3

BIOE 131: Ethics in Bioengineering (ETHICSOC 131X)

Bioengineering focuses on the development and application of new technologies in the biology and medicine. These technologies often have powerful effects on living systems at the microscopic and macroscopic level. They can provide great benefit to society, but they also can be used in dangerous or damaging ways. These effects may be positive or negative, and so it is critical that bioengineers understand the basic principles of ethics when thinking about how the technologies they develop can and should be applied. On a personal level, every bioengineer should understand the basic principles of ethical behavior in the professional setting. This course will involve substantial writing, and will use case-study methodology to introduce both societal and personal ethical principles, with a focus on practical applications.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-EthicReas, WAY-ER

BIOE 217: Translational Bioinformatics (BIOMEDIN 217, CS 275)

Computational methods for the translation of biomedical data into diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic applications in medicine. Topics: multi-scale omics data generation and analysis, utility and limitations of public biomedical resources, machine learning and data mining, issues and opportunities in drug discovery, and mobile/digital health solutions. Case studies and course project. Prerequisites: programming ability at the level of CS 106A and familiarity with biology and statistics.
Terms: Win | Units: 4

BIOE 229: Advanced Research Topics in Multi-modality Molecular Imaging of Living Subjects

Covers advanced topics and controversies in molecular imaging in the understanding of biology and disease. Lectures will include discussion on instrumentation, probes and bioassays. Topics will address unmet needs for visualization and quantification of molecular pathways in biology as well as for diagnosis and disease management. Areas of unmet clinical needs include those in oncology, neurology, cardiovascular medicine and musculoskeletal diseases. The aim is to identify important problems and controversies in a field and address them by providing background and relevance through review of the relevant primary literature, and then proposing and evaluating innovative imaging strategies that are designed to address the problem. The organization of lectures is similar to the thought process that is necessary for writing an NIH grant proposal in which aims are proposed and supported by background and relevance. The innovation of proposed approaches will be highlighted. An aim of the course is to inform students on how to creatively think about a problem and propose a solution focusing on the key elements of writing a successful grant proposal. Prerequisites: none.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4
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