2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

451 - 460 of 587 results for: Medicine

MED 271: Global Biodesign: Medical Technology in an International Context (BIOE 371)

This course ( BIOE 371, OIT 587, MED 271) examines the challenges and opportunities of developing and implementing innovative medical technologies to help patients around the world. Faculty and guest speakers discuss the status of the global health technology industry, as well as trends and issues affecting health technology innovation in seven primary geographic regions: Africa, China, Europe, India, Japan, Latin America, and the United States. Students explore key differences between the covered geographies, which range from emerging markets with vast bottom-of-the-pyramid and growing middle class populations, to well-established markets with sophisticated demands and shifting demographics. The course utilizes real-world case studies and class projects to promote engagement and provide a hands-on learning experience. Students work in multidisciplinary teams with real-world companies to develop a plan for bringing an existing product to a new global market. Teams will interact with representatives from their chosen company throughout the quarter, as well as with a faculty mentor, and present their recommendations at the conclusion of spring term.
Last offered: Spring 2016

MED 272A: Biodesign Innovation: Needs Finding and Concept Creation (BIOE 374A, ME 368A)

In this two-quarter course series ( BIOE 374A/B, MED 272A/B, ME 368A/B, OIT 384/5), multidisciplinary student teams identify real-world unmet healthcare needs, invent new medtech products to address them, and plan for their development into patient care. During the first quarter (winter 2017), students select and characterize an important unmet healthcare problem, validate it through primary interviews and secondary research, and then brainstorm and screen initial technology-based solutions. In the second quarter (spring 2017), teams select a lead solution and move it toward the market through prototyping, technical re-risking, strategies to address healthcare-specific requirements (regulation, reimbursement), and business planning. Final presentations in winter and spring are made to a panel of prominent medtech experts and investors. Class sessions include faculty-led instruction and case demonstrations, coaching sessions by industry specialists, expert guest lecturers, and interactive team meetings. Enrollment is by application only, and students are expected to participate in both quarters of the course. Visit http://biodesign.stanford.edu/programs/stanford-courses/biodesign-innovation.html to access the application, examples of past projects, and student testimonials. More information about Stanford Biodesign, which has led to the creation of more than 40 venture-backed healthcare companies and has helped hundreds of student launch health technology careers, can be found at http://biodesign.stanford.edu/.
Terms: Win | Units: 4

MED 272B: Biodesign Innovation: Concept Development and Implementation (BIOE 374B, ME 368B)

In this two-quarter course series ( BIOE 374A/B, MED 272A/B, ME 368A/B, OIT 384/5), multidisciplinary student teams identify real-world unmet healthcare needs, invent new medtech products to address them, and plan for their development into patient care. During the first quarter (winter 2017), students select and characterize an important unmet healthcare problem, validate it through primary interviews and secondary research, and then brainstorm and screen initial technology-based solutions. In the second quarter (spring 2017), teams select a lead solution and move it toward the market through prototyping, technical re-risking, strategies to address healthcare-specific requirements (regulation, reimbursement), and business planning. Final presentations in winter and spring are made to a panel of prominent medtech experts and investors. Class sessions include faculty-led instruction and case demonstrations, coaching sessions by industry specialists, expert guest lecturers, and interactive team meetings. Enrollment is by application only, and students are expected to participate in both quarters of the course. Visit http://biodesign.stanford.edu/programs/stanford-courses/biodesign-innovation.html to access the application, examples of past projects, and student testimonials. More information about Stanford Biodesign, which has led to the creation of more than 40 venture-backed healthcare companies and has helped hundreds of student launch health technology careers, can be found at http://biodesign.stanford.edu/.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4

MED 273: Biodesign for Mobile Health (BIOE 273)

This course examines the emerging mobile health industry. Mobile health refers to the provision of health services and information via digital technologies such as mobile phones and wearable sensors. Faculty from Stanford University and other academic institutions, as well as guest lecturers from the mobile health industry discuss factors driving needs in the field, explore opportunities and challenges that characterize the emerging mobile health innovation landscape, and present an overview of the technologies, initiatives, and companies that are transforming the way we access health care today.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-3

MED 274: Design for Service Innovation (BIOE 372, HRP 274)

(Same as OIT 343/01) Open to graduate students from all schools and departments. An experiential project course in which students work in multidisciplinary teams to design new services to address the needs of medically patients. Project teams partner with "safety net" hospitals and clinics to find better ways to deliver care to the low income and uninsured patients these institutions serve. Students learn proven innovation processes from experienced GSB, d. school, and SoM faculty, interface with students from across the university, and have the opportunity to see their ideas translated into improvements in the quality and efficiency of healthcare in the real world. Prerequisite: admission to the course is by application only. Applications available at http://DesignForService.stanford.edu. Applications must be submitted by November 16, 2011.
Last offered: Winter 2012

MED 275B: Biodesign Fundamentals

MED 275B is an introduction to the Biodesign process for health technology innovation. This team-based course emphasizes interdisciplinary collaboration and hands-on learning at the intersection of medicine and technology. Students will work on projects in the space of medical devices, digital health, and healthcare technologies with the assistance of clinical and industry mentors. Applicants from all majors and stages in their education welcome. n nStudents will work in teams to develop solutions to current unmet medical needs, starting with a deep dive into understanding and characterizing important unmet medical needs through disease research, competitive analysis, market research, and stakeholder analysis. In the latter part of the course, students will go through the design cycle and build prototypes to their needs. The course will conclude with a pitch day where students will present and demonstrate their solution to a panel of judges, including prominent academics, industry professionals, and investors. Other topics that will be discussed include FDA regulation of medical technology, intellectual property, value proposition, and business model development. There will be guest speakers from Google X, IDEO, and more.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4

MED 282: Early Clinical Experience at the Cardinal Free Clinics (MED 182)

The Cardinal Free Clinics, consisting of Arbor and Pacific Free Clinic, provide culturally appropriate, high quality transitional medical care for undeserved patient populations in the Bay Area. Students volunteer in various clinic roles to offer services including health education, interpretation, referrals, and labs. Clinical students are guided in the practice of medical interviews, history-taking and physical examinations as appropriate, and work with attending physicians to arrive at a diagnosis and management plan. By application only. Visit http://cfc.stanford.edu for more information.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit

MED 284B: Team Leadership in the Cardinal Free Clinics II (MED 184B)

Continuation of MED 184A/ MED 284A. Introduction to skills for effective leadership, including: conflict resolution, team dynamics, leadership styles, personality types, giving and receiving feedback, and group decision-making. Utilizes hands-on-activities and real-life clinic scenarios. Applied learning through shifts at the Cardinal Free Clinics and related project work. Enrollment limited to Cardinal Free Clinic Managers.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit

MED 284C: Team Leadership in the Cardinal Free Clinics III (MED 184C)

Continuation of MED 184A/ MED 284A and MED 184B/ MED284B. Introduction to skills for effective leadership, including: conflict resolution, team dynamics, leadership styles, personality types, giving and receiving feedback, and group decision-making. Utilizes hands-on-activities and real-life clinic scenarios. Applied learning through shifts at the Cardinal Free Clinics and related project work. Enrollment limited to Cardinal Free Clinic Managers.
Terms: Win | Units: 1
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints