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231 - 240 of 587 results for: Medicine

GENE 286C: Advanced Genetic Counseling Seminar

Continuation of 286A/B. For genetic counseling students only. Psychosocial issues associated with genetic counseling cases are discussed through presentation of cases that students have seen throughout their training. Professional development topics including: the expanding roles of genetic counselors; billing, reimbursement, and licensing; the role of genetic counseling in the changing healthcare system; the incorporation of genetics into all areas of medicine and public health; and implications of direct-to-consumer genetic testing. Prerequisites: GENE 285 A,B,C and 276.
Last offered: Spring 2011

GERMAN 128N: Medicine, Modernism, and Mysticism in Thomas Mann's the Magic Mountain

Published in 1924, The Magic Mountain is a novel of education, tracing the intellectual growth of a budding engineer through a maze of intellectual encounters during a seven- year sojourn in a sanatorium set high in the Swiss Alps. It engages with the key themes of modernism: the relativity of time, the impact of psychoanalysis, the power of myth, and an extended dispute between an optimistic belief in progress and a pessimistic vision of human nature. Through its detailed discussion of disease (tuberculosis), this remarkable text connects the study of medicine to the humanities. There will be an exploration of this rich and profound novel both as a document of early twentieth-century Europe and as a commentary on the possibilities of education that are urgent for liberal arts education today. Taught in English.
Last offered: Autumn 2012 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II

GS 182: Field Trip to Cascade Volcanoes of California

Three-day field trip (involving light hiking and camping) to study active and dormant volcanoes of northern California, including Mt. Shasta, Mt. Lassen, and Medicine Lake, and their relationship to regional extensional faulting. Features visited include stratovolcanoes, cinder cones, lava caves, obsidian flows, hot springs and hydrothermal alteration, volcanic blast deposits and mudflows, debris avalanches, fault scarps. Recommended: 1 or equivalent. Limited enrollment; preference to frosh, sophs, and undergraduates and graduates majoring in SE3.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1
Instructors: Mahood, G. (PI)

GSBGEN 551: Innovation and Management in Health Care

The health care system accounts for over 17% of US GDP and is one of the fastest growing segments of the economy. This two unit class focuses on the interplay and tension between the main players in the health care field - providers of health care services (individual doctors, group practices, integrated health care systems), payors (insurances companies, employers, consumers, and government), patients, and innovator companies (biopharma, medical device, diagnostics, and health care IT). The course is designed for students with a broad diversity of backgrounds and interests who want to better understand the health care business and system. No prior experience in the health care or medical field is assumed or needed. The focus of the class will be primarily on the US health care system, but there will be limited discussion of non-US systems as well. nnThe course is divided into four modules: n1. An overview of the US Health Care System and the interplay between payers, providers, and innovatorsn2. Provider organization models and incentive structuresn - The relationship between quality, cost, and accessn - Integrated systems and fee for service modelsn - New IT technologies, including electronic data records, and incentives for adoption n - How the delivery system structure affects technology innovatorsn3. Innovator business models and issuesn - Financing and managing new product development and portfolio managementn - Clinical trial management and gaining regulatory approvaln - Marketing, communication and sales strategies (both physician and patient communication and sales) to drive product adoption and gain third party reimbursementn - Business models to drive innovationn4. Health care system reform nnThe class will be taught primarily from the perspective of a business person operating a company rather than that of a policy maker, academic, or investor. While there will be a few lectures to provide background and frameworks for course topics, most classes will involve a case discussion and prominent guest speakers from the health care industry. Speakers and panelists last year included CEOs from Genomic Health, Tenet Health, Blue Shield of California, Jazz Pharmaceuticals, Safeway, and Practice Fusion; venture investors from Venrock and Chicago-Pacific; and the Dean of Stanford Medicine.
Terms: Win | Units: 2
Instructors: Chess, R. (PI)

HISTORY 12: Medicine and Disease in the Ancient World

(Same as HISTORY 112. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 112.) This course explores medicine and disease through case studies from civilizations of the ancient world such as Egypt, Greece, and Peru. We will discuss how these cultures conceptualized disease, and in turn, how they contended with illnesses. Lectures will address different forms of illness through medical texts, art, and human remains. Weekly discussion will incorporate evidence from these sources to explore both their potential and their limitations.
Last offered: Autumn 2014

HISTORY 30A: In Sickness and In Health: Medicine and Society in the United States: 1800-Present (AMSTUD 130A, HISTORY 130A)

Explores the history of medical institutions, ideas and practices in the United States from the early nineteenth century to the present. How are ideas of illness and health historically rooted and socially constructed? How did scientific and medical discoveries lead to the rise of scientific medicine, and how were these innovations adopted within the American cultural landscape? Topics include the transformation of therapeutics and technologies, medicine and the scientific ideal in the U.S., gender and race and medicine, the history of public health, and the professionalization and specialization of American medical practice.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI
Instructors: Horn, M. (PI)

HISTORY 32S: Medicine and Society: The Rise of Expertise in Early Modern Europe

How did medicine emerge as a distinctive body of knowledge? Why did physicians, rather than other medical practitioners, come to dominate medicine? What was the role of women in medicine? How did law and medicine, two areas that have so many points of intersection in today¿s world, interact in early modern society? This course investigates the history of medicine in Renaissance and early modern Europe. With its emphasis on primary sources, the course provides an introduction to medical and legal historical research. Priority given to history majors and minors.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Roever, J. (PI)

HISTORY 44: Women and Gender in Science, Medicine and Engineering

(Same as HISTORY 144. Majors and others taking 5 units, enroll in HISTORY 144.) Men's and women's roles in science, medicine, and engineering over the past 200 years with a focus on the present. What efforts are underway globally to transform research institutions so that both men's and women's careers can flourish? How have science and medicine studied and defined males and females? How can we harness the creative power of gender analysis to enhance knowledge and spark innovation?
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

HISTORY 44Q: Gendered Innovations in Science, Medicine, Engineering, and Environment (FEMGEN 44Q)

Section 1 focuses on the history of women in science, medicine, and engineering. Section 2 looks at transforming research institutions so that both men and women can flourish. Section 3 explores how sex and gender analysis can enhance creativity. We discuss concrete examples of how taking gender into account has yielded new research results. Stanford University currently has a multiple year collaboration with the European Commission for Gendered Innovations, and this class will be part of that project. This course fulfills the second level Writing and Rhetoric Requirement (WRITE 2) and will emphasize oral and multimedia presentation.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI, Writing 2

HISTORY 112: Medicine and Disease in the Ancient World

(Same as HISTORY 12. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for HISTORY 112.) This course explores medicine and disease through case studies from civilizations of the ancient world such as Egypt, Greece, and Peru. We will discuss how these cultures conceptualized disease, and in turn, how they contended with illnesses. Lectures will address different forms of illness through medical texts, art, and human remains. Weekly discussion will incorporate evidence from these sources to explore both their potential and their limitations.
Last offered: Autumn 2014
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